Cattle on shares?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Mike in Ohio, Nov 23, 2004.

  1. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Is anyone running cattle on shares or know of anyone that is?

    I'm looking at fencing my hay pasture and working out a deal with my neighbor to run feeder steers. Apart from providing pasture and fencing I am willing to put up some of the money towards stocking the steers. He would be putting up primarily the care of the animals.

    I currently have 27 acres of pasture and am currently negotiating to pick up another adjacent 10 acres. I'm not sure how much I'll fence this year. I'm kind of leaning towards fencing "the north pasture", which is a bit over 7 acres and adjacent to his property, as a start.

    I'm not looking to squeeze the last dollar out of this, I'm just trying to figure out what would be fair to him and fair to me. My alternative is not to fence and to plow under the hay field with a mind to planting mixed wild flowers or clover as forage for my bees.

    Thanks in advance for your input. I also posted this on the cattle board but that doesn't get as much traffic.

    Mike
     
  2. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    I can't answer your question, but am interested to hear, also. I don't have any acreage (yet...sigh), but would LOVE to purchase part of a steer. As a single woman, I don't need, nor have space to store, a whole one.

    Maybe once I get some land and can go in shares, I'll try it, too. In the meantime, I'm anxious to hear from others in response to your question.

    Chris, NW Ohio
     

  3. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Mike, if you are providing the pasture and the financing for the feeder calves then the other individual is in reality the hired hand providing the day to day care. He has no risk and the reward would be minimal. I question if the acreage is adequate to carry enough cattle to provide adequate income to pay a herdsman. The other situation would be for the cattle owner to lease your property as pasture. Again, with your having to construct a fence and not knowing the forage available, I am unable to arrive at a fair value for the pasture. Probably the fairest approach is to establish a fee for pasturing based on the number of cattle grazing per month or a price per pound for the gain while utilizing your acreage. The last feeder calves I sold brought $110 per hundred and I really do not see how the finishers make much money unless they have a high volume.
     
  4. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm not familiar with a deal where you would own a percentage of the animals. The fairest way I know is getting paid so much per pound of gain. When feeders were in the 55 to 75 cent range, I knew of guys paying 25 cents per pound of gain. With feeders at 1.10 I could see the amount per pound being higher.
    Also many charge a monthly fee per head. Or some places charge a monthly fee for each thousand pounds of animals that are pastured. It's going to take much more pasture for a cow-calf unit than a yearling calf alone.
     
  5. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies. The point is that it isn't worth it to me to simply lease the pasture.

    I'm willing to consider picking up part of the cost of the cattle (not all) so this isn't a case of him being a hired hand. He already has cattle on his property but doesn't have enough land to expand.

    So what I'm trying to do is find an approach that works for both of us. Think of it as a (small) business relationship with a potential to expand.

    It may be that it isn't workable and that's ok for me as well (not so good for him). I'm just exploring.

    Mike
     
  6. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    Mike,

    The neighbours (3) rent 20,000 acres of range land from the government for about $900 a month from June to October. They run about 500 cows and 500 calfs between the three of them.

    IMHO

    With all the problems with cows, it might be better to replow and replant to new hay. Then you control the situation totally, or you can share crop the hay. If you plant hay, then where we are, the field owner gets 40%, and the harvester gets 60%. You could even plant a clover/alfalfa hay for the bees.

    Then for seven to ten years it's 40/60. Or 100% if you do it yourself. DIY on a small field could be lots of fun, even if you have other work. You could get some get old equipment - you don't need the latest and greatest for that small. Though you would have to have it in top notch, and ready to go. "Make hay [ONLY] when the sun shines".

    I don't think I would want cows around messing up a few acres of mine. If I had a lot more and then I could rent out range land, and have a hired man look after them, then sure. Or, if I was into the labor of giving them salt and checking on them, sure then on a very large range it might be OK.

    Of course we are now vegetarian (we weren’t always, and have raised many cows for slaughter, so my comments at this point my be a little slanted).

    Can you grow Soy Beans? HA, re vegetarian.

    Good Luck.

    Alex
     
  7. Cornhusker

    Cornhusker Unapologetically me Supporter

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    Mike
    How many head are you talking about?
    I'm not sure how many acres it takes there, but around here 27 acres wouldn't do more than 2 cows.
    One thing you can do is decide how many head your land will support, and buy half that many.
    Say it'll support 10 head, then you buy 5, and he takes care of them, feeds supplement, puts out salt and mineral, in tother words treats them just like his own in exchange for using the other half your pasture.
    You then have 5 full grown cows for the cost of 5 calves and you didn't have to do any of the work.
    It's a simple deal that would work for both.
     
  8. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    This is exactly along the lines that I'm thinking. I'm just trying to understand what a fair deal (for both of us) would be.

    Mike
     
  9. Ozarkquilter46

    Ozarkquilter46 Well-Known Member

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    I have a girlfriend out here in Mo that raises cattle. She has rented pasture and she says the deal she gets is 5 dollars a head per month and 7 for cow-calf pair. No bulls allowed. There is no swaping one cow for another in the same month. If you take one cow out on the 4th day of the month and put another one in on the 25th you still have to pay your 5$ for each. The owner of the cattle have to break ice on pond twice a day and they also have to maintain fencing!!! With the cost of fencing you have to make sure that is in your contract. Everything written out and signed by both sides. She had a cow take down about 50 yards of fencing one time and she had to replace the old rotten wood posts with t posts and the wire also. The person and his son did help her put it back up but she had to pay for the materials and it wasn't cheep. Good luck. Once someone rents from you they will feel like they own it. I just met this friend when I moved here and she ask me to go berry picking with her. She took a bunch of us ladys. Anyway the owner lived out there and ran us all off and told her she is only to use it for her cattle and not to run her friends on (insurance reasons) and then one time I went out with her husband to help with a cow having a calf and while we were there his son 8 years old tossed a line in the pond and the owners came back out and told him No Fishing. They had just spent about 200.00 to stock it and it wasn't so other people could take there fish home. My friends husband was really pi$$ed off and on the way home he was cussin the owner because he said he payed rent on the darn place. I just kept my mouth shut because I tended to agree with the owner :)
     
  10. Ozarkquilter46

    Ozarkquilter46 Well-Known Member

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    I ment to say 50 feet not 50 yards LOL I am a quilter so I am always thinking in yards LOL