Catfaced tomatos

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Randy Rooster, May 8, 2006.

  1. Randy Rooster

    Randy Rooster Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I thought my greenhouse tomatoes were doing so well until I started looking at the development of the fruits- most of them are catfaced terribly- I have never had catfaced tomatoes before-

    How much of the tomatoe will be useable when ripe?

    I have early goliath, tomcat, and early girl- only the tomcat seem immune to the catfacing- does anyone have any other recommendations for varieties to use next year for early tomatoes? are greenhouse tomatoes specifically immune to this disease? ( those greenhouse tomatoe seeds are terribly expensive)

    thank you
     
  2. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Catfacing is not a disease, but a psysiological condition caused by uneven pollination. If the seed sac doesn't get pollinated, then it will collapse, forming a scar. The tomatoes are perfectly useable; just cut out the affected area. I don't find that any varieties are particularly susceptible, but then, our container grown plants are under a side-less greenhouse in the summer. Because of this, we use reguar garden varieties. There are specific greenhouse varieties available, though. If you can't find them in the seed catalogs, try calling the companies. Sometimes they have things that aren't listed but are still available.

    Tomatoes in the greenhouse should have some help pollinating. Just vibrate the plants and it will cause the pollen to get distributed. Big outfits use a battery-powered wand, but you can simply tap on your plants to do the same thing.
     

  3. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Catfacing. That's a term I've not heard before.

    What does it look like?

    Thanks,
    Pony!
     
  4. MoonShine

    MoonShine Fire On The Mountain

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    I haven't heard of that either...I'm curious,too.
     
  5. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    You'll find one example of catfacing in this tomato disorders site: http://wihort.uwex.edu/fruitveggies/TomatoDisorders.htm#4Tom3 A you will see, there are a number of factors which may cause it. Many large-fruited varieties are simply prone to catfacing while you never see it in some similar varieties or types. The worse that I ever saw was Aunt Gertie's Gold but it was only the largest fruit which were involved. The taste isn't affected so one simply cuts out the bad parts. AGG was good enough that I'm growing it again this year despite knowing that there will be some ugly fruit in the process.

    Martin
     
  6. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Catfacing is a scar that runs vertically on the tomato -- from the stem end to the blossom end. It looks kind of like a dark, lumpy, sunken seam in the fruit, which is the result of the collapsed seed sac.

    Not to be confused with cracking and splitting, which generally occur around the stem end but can be bad enough to run down the fruit. These are open areas rather than a scar; they can be invaded by microorganisms with all the subsequent rot, which rarely occurs with catfacing.