Catching goats-HELP!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Dian, Jul 15, 2006.

  1. Dian

    Dian Well-Known Member

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    We were reciently given 3 nannie goats and a donkey because the elderly owners are moving to town. They were looking for a good home for them. We had already ask about buying the goats, but they were afraid they wouldn't be able to sell the old donkey, so they told us if we would take the donkey we could have them all.
    We finally after about 3 hours in about 95 degree weather got the donkey and one of the goats caught and home. We still haven't been able to catch the other 2 goats. They will come to the owner for feed, but will not follow her in the barn. Thay have figured us out. The fences are down so there is really no way to corner them.
    Does anybody have any ideas how we can use to catch them? Is there any kind of sedative or tranquilizer we could give them or would we have to have a vet come out (don't know if that is even possible)?
    Real Estate people are tearing out more fencing and bulldozing all around them, and they are getting more and more scared.
    Any help or ideas will be appreciated. Thanks, Dian
     
  2. mamahen

    mamahen Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, if they come to the owner for feed, why not give them a rope, leash or leadrope to slip over their head, while they are busy eating. If they think YOu are going to catch them, hide until they are "lassoed".

    Now, if they do manage to hook one, and the goats aren't used to being lead, they are in for a strggle for a little bit. Are they up to that? Can you hide close by & hurry to help once they are caught?
     

  3. tioga12

    tioga12 Well-Known Member

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    Are you SURE you want these goats? (Sorry, I just couldn't resist)
     
  4. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    have them feed them in the barn, once they are in the barn close the door behind them, or if your useing a traler feed them in the traler and have them go in on their own for the grain, then close the door,
     
  5. Dian

    Dian Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions so far. We tried putting corn in the trailor and going out of sight, they didn't go for it. We only had the trailor for one day. She has been feeding them outside for quite a while. It is a very old barn, no doors on it for her to close. She can get them to go in the barn, but not in the stall where she can close them up. They do go in the barn, but everytime we go there they somehow know and go bolting out before we can get close enough to try to pen them in. The lady is elderly and not in very good health, I don't know if she could get a rope on them. If she did I would be afraid they would hurt her before we could get to them.
    Yes I am sure we want them, but DH is beginning to have doubts. Besides if somebody doesn't catch them they will be left all alone without anybody or any fences-don't know what would happen to them then.
    Keep the ideas comming. Thanks, Dian
     
  6. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    Yes, yes, food is a great motivator! Let the owners feed less the night before so they want the food and will go into the barn. Have the realtor tell the contractors to not work in that area that morning (that will be the hard part) Or don't feed in the morning and grain them at night in the barn after all the workers are gone and it is quiet. If they won't go into the barn, have the owners use a bucket that the goats have to put their heads in and walk as they are eating, pulling the bucket away toward where they need to go so they don't eat it all and run off again.

    Once you get them to your place, you should confine these goats in a small area until they get used to you and know you are good and give them their food or you will continue to have problems.

    Silly animals... don't know what's good for them.
     
  7. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    thats a good idea, if they were not fed at all the night before or that morning untill you can get there and then only fed in the stall they will go in, and then you can catch them,
     
  8. ChickenMom

    ChickenMom Well-Known Member

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    Tie one end of the rope to something sturdy like a tree, have the other end in a loop over the bucket, when the goat sticks it's head in the bucket slip the rope over the neck. Make it to where the rope will tighten when the goat pulls on it. Stand back until the fur stops flying and then take the rope and get the goat. I had to do this for about 2 weeks or more to get mine to let me milk her.
     
  9. stacygoats

    stacygoats Well-Known Member

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    You have to be sneaky!
    I would get some kind of panel to use as a temporary gate/door on the barn, since they are going in there. Food is definitely the key, put food in the stall (then move out of view), but the boss goat may be the only one to go into the confined stall to eat the others will stand off (but when they are all in the barn, sneak up and close off the opening.). If you can confine them inside the barn then it's just a matter of cornering them until you can grab em or rope em.
     
  10. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    BTW, a calf halter works GREAT at controlling goats. Just put it on, lift their heads, and they quit struggling very quickly.
     
  11. 6e

    6e Farm lovin wife Supporter

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    My hubby wanted me to add that if all the sneaky doesn't work and you start getting frustrated you can call Fish and Game or Animal Control and they'll dart them. It may be the least stressful way for you and the goats. :)
     
  12. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    I'd be very careful with darting. Goats react strangely to being knocked out.

    But you could you could drug them just a little...

    When our goats get yellow jacket stings we give them a benadryl. We use the tablet form and serve it up in corn. They don't get corn very often so they gobble it up. Benadryl helps the swelling and discomfort from the sting, but also kind of knocks them off their hoofies for a few hours.

    One pill has an effect, and we would never give more than two under any circumstances.

    To make this work in your situation you'd need to start by withholding feed to heighten their interest. Then serve a small helping of corn for each in seperate buckets with one benadryl per bucket. That way even if one goat gets both buckets you don't over drug. You can combine this with what you are doing in trying to bait them into the stall.

    Another thought, do they normally sleep in the stall? If the stall is a safe place for them, you could withhold grain for a day or so, then set up a feeding station and have someone else bring an unfamiliar leashed dog into the yard. That might give them motivation to move into the stall if they view it as secure. Keep the dog leashed and under control - and far enough back to steer the goats without them being so threatened that they race past it. Even a small dog, if unfamiliar to the goats, can be used to help with steering.

    Lynda
     
  13. Janis Sauncy

    Janis Sauncy Well-Known Member

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    Do you know anyone with a good herding dog (Border Collie, Aussie, etc.) that has experience with goats? A good dog could get the goats into the barn and hold them there until the opening could be blocked.

    I have a Border Collie that loves to hear the words, "Panda, get the goats in." And the goats have learned, also, that when they hear the words they might as well head on in anyway!
     
  14. Sweet Goats

    Sweet Goats Cashmere goats

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    Another option is, a leg snair. I have not used one because my goats are all PRETTY easy to get, (not always). I have thought of getting one for my babies because they are the harders at time. Most farm stores sell them, they are mainly used on sheep. That is another good thing about horns, get close enough and grab the horn.
    Don't give up. The main thing is don't chase them, they will be harder to tame later. Take your time. Good luck.