Cat Question????

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by thebeav, Mar 1, 2005.

  1. thebeav

    thebeav Well-Known Member

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    A stray cat showed up at my house. She appears to be about ready to pop. Is there a way to tell when a cat is going into labor? What type of shots do the kittens require and at what age? Any help will be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. gonecountry

    gonecountry Member

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    I would call a vet for the best advice. She will probably start looking for a "nest" when she is ready to give birth. Maybe give her a nice size box with some old towels in a quiet place. As for the shots, I dont think they need any 'til the are around six weeks old. Good luck!!!
     

  3. momofmany

    momofmany Dayenu farms

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    colo-Dado! As my enthusiatic 4 yo calls it.
    oh wow.

    I am kind of excited for you, and kind of thinking that I am glad it isn't me LOL :) I am sure mama will do a good job with them.

    When i lived in KY the kindly neighbor lady was feeding the strays and one came into my garage to orphan her babies on me. I was 6 weeks pregnant...morning sickness and kitties that pooped all over didn't go together too smashingly well.

    Just give mama a nice dark place to hide and have her babies. It is doubtful she will have them well if she feels like an exhibit.
    Lots of protein and some good heavy cream prolly wouldn't hurt either.

    Nicole
     
  4. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    Like everybody said, she'll most likely take care of the birthing all by herself. Try not to bother her and the babies very much at first or she may move them. Gonecountry is correct: distemper shots starting at 6 weeks (every 3-4 weeks until they are about 12-15 weeks old). You'll have to wait until after the kitties are born before vaccinating Mom. You can start deworming them at about 2 weeks old (deworm Mom now and with the kitties too). Pyrantel/Strongid is a good wormer-talk to your vet about getting some and what his/her recommendations are. I'd recommend that Mom be tested for Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) ASAP. They usually pass Leukemia on to the kittens and sometimes pass FIV on. There's no cure for either disease and it's always better to know before you get really attached or before they infect everybody in the neighborhood. She can be spayed as soon as the kitties are old enough to wean (about 6-8 weeks). Don't wait any longer than that or else she'll get pregnant again. Good Luck and HAVE FUN with the babies!

    Sarah
     
  5. Reillybug

    Reillybug Active Member

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    As a kitty foster parent for a local rescue group, we recently learned a valuable lesson. Kittens/cats should definitely be tested for FIV/FeL, but if young kittens are positive for FIV it is not necessarily a death sentence. It is probably from the mother's milk, and if removed from Mom's milk, they are very likely to test negative at 6 months or so once they work it out of their system, so to speak. We've had several litters of kittens recently that tested positive for FIV and after doing much research we found some information from Cornell Vet School that recommended removing the kittens from the mother (which they were since they were abandoned) and retesting at 6 months. All my foster kittens, save one, that originally tested positive were negative at their 6 month test. It's the same premise as babies born to HIV+ mothers.
     
  6. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    That's exactly right and it's because the test for FIV is an antibody test and they get those from their mother's milk. So maybe a positive test could be a false positive. All the antibodies should be out of the system at least by 5-6 months of age. If a kitten tests positive for FeLV, it's another story. That test actually tests for the presence of the virus, so if it's positive the kitten HAS FeLV.

    Sarah
     
  7. Reillybug

    Reillybug Active Member

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    Sarah- I'm so surprised (and happy) that you knew that! We couldn't find a vet in the Denver-metro area who didn't believe that a positive FIV result in a kitten meant they were unadoptable and doomed to die a slow death! I feel better knowing some vets do know this and are giving hope to the owners of these kittens.
     
  8. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    :dance:
     
  9. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It seems to me that a queen will disappear into your favorite closet, usually on top of your favorite clothing, when she is ready to birth. And you won't know about it until it's too darned late.

    So, I would suggest closing all closet doors, unless the beautiful (but in danger of being rejected) nest you've made for her is in one of your closets. ;)

    Pony!