Cat information

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Dian, Mar 16, 2004.

  1. Dian

    Dian Well-Known Member

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    I am getting an adult cat-female already spayed. What kind of routine care will she need as in shots, worming,and anything else I'm not thinking of and how often is it needed? Do any of you give cats shots yourself or is this something the Vet will have to take care of? Thanks for any help! Dian
     
  2. Amy Jo

    Amy Jo Well-Known Member

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    My cats are never outside, so they get very little "routine" immunizations. I do make sure they get hairball medicine as directed on the package and purchase food for indoor cats - probably does the same thing the hairball meds do, but I buy it anyways. Worming is also not necessary, as they aren't exposed to that risk. However, I would make sure they were immunized for rabies, distemper and feline leukemia if they were able to go out.Feline Leukemia killed one of my cats and it was terrible, and is very widespread.
     

  3. HorseGal

    HorseGal Well-Known Member

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    It depends on whether or not you cat is going to be an indoor cat...they don't need as many shots. If its going to be able to go outside it will need a rabies shot, feline Lukemia shot, I think they also get bordatella(sp) shots and one for distemper....not sure....but the rabies shot and the feline lukemia shot are good ones to get even if your cat doesn't go outside...always the chance of it escaping.

    Barbara

    - I might have add some shots for just dogs...not sure, been a long time since my cat was given any shots.
     
  4. Dian

    Dian Well-Known Member

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    Sorry forgot to mention, this will be an outside cat. Thanks for the info. Dian
     
  5. RAC

    RAC Guest

    I think it depends to a certain extent on where you live--some areas require cats to be licensed, and I assume that those areas also require rabies shots for cats as well. I never understood the logic of licensing cats, as it is nigh onto impossible to prove a cat belongs to you, cats being what they are.... Dogs, on the other hand--very easy to prove ownership because they are so chummy.

    I think city cats should be vaccinated because they are around so many other cats, dogs, possums, etc. in close proximity, whether they go out on a regular basis or not. Microchips, imho, are a waste of money--people are more likely to pay attention and call with a collar tag. Less trouble than taking a cat to the vet or animal shelter. If the cat is a desirable breed, sorry to say, chip or collar, it will probably be stolen....

    Country cats, maybe rabies, if that--unless you think the other diseases are a problem. Worming as needed.
     
  6. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :)Here is a page from The American Association of Feline Practitioners and vaccine guidelines for cats: http://www.api4animals.org/556.htm

    Don't know what your area is around your house but she might not be with you long if she's an "outdoor" cat.

    One thing I'd like to mention here. People who do not vaccinate their animals because "they keep them in the house" and think they are protected are kidding themselves. Do you ever have "outdoor" cats or strays or the neighbors cats come by to visit your place? Would you know if they did...at night? Do you know you can carry these diseases in on your shoes and other places where you contact where another cat has been? Do you ever take your cat to the Vet? Like for rabies shots or anything else? Where do you think cats are taken that are sick with other diseases? They are taken to the Vets! So, when you take YOUR indoor cat in for whatever, chances are it's exposed right there!

    There is a long list of "holes" in the stand to not vaccinat the indoor cat..this is only a few. I'd have people tell me all of the time right in the Vet's exam room.."no, we don't want vaccines. Our cat(dog)never goes anywhere." Amazing! :rolleyes: LQ
     
  7. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    Hemobartanella (sp??) is a tick disease which is rampant among cats. I think I read its rates are approaching those of feline leukemia. You can't vaccinate against it, I don't think, but you certainly want to familiarize yourself with the symptoms, esp. because you are adopting an adult and because she will be an outside cat.

    I had a cat who got hemobartonella (sp?????) years ago before its prevalence was so widespread. He had to have emrgency treatment and rounds of tetracycline every year. He lived another 10 years, however, so they can have a good life if it's caught early and treated.
     
  8. Amy Jo

    Amy Jo Well-Known Member

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    You know something? I didn't know that any of these diseases could be spread so easily. I thought it required a bite or some kind of bodily fluid exchange. I will find out what kinds of diseases can be spread that way and make sure my cats are vaccinated. My husband takes wood in for his dad several times a week and his neighborhood is covered with feral cats.

    I never knew that!
     
  9. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Well, LOL, I am glad you are thinking now. Excellent! Let me give you another scenario as you mentioned bodily fluid exchange. You must have cats, right?.....so, you know how a male cat(and many females too)mark territory. They back up to something and spray. Correct? This spray could be anywhere. The favorite places of roaming cats to spray are around doorways where there is a cat in residence,. trees, bushes, around car tires, plants, anywhere you disturb like where you clean(rake? sweep? etc) or garden. If you disturb something the neighborhood cats must come back and re mark the area and if they can, the tools you use. I'ts instinct. So, you are outside, you walk right through all of this and maybe handle these things every single day and tromp it right in the house to your indoor cat. And we havn't even scratched the surface of where you encounter their feces.....and the spit they rub on things to scent mark, which is what your cat is doing with you when they rub their faces on you. Not love.....labeling! LOL

    It should be a requirement that puppies and kittens come with a handbook! LOL

    I am glad you are giving this a good looking over. Good show!

    Enjoy the spring.... :) LQ
     
  10. What about deworming? How often does that need to be done? Our outdoor cat in the city keeps bringing home mice, he had deworming pills last month, but is it yearly? can I buy some or do I have to take him to the vet?
    Thanks.
     
  11. Amy Jo

    Amy Jo Well-Known Member

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    Yep, and they are my babies right now. My kids all jumped out of the nest, (rotten kids) though one will give me a grandson in the next week or two! yippee skippee... but I adore my little feline family and am happy to immunize them as necessary... just wasn't aware that it was necessary...

    Boo & Chloe thank you (well, not really, because they don't like the vet, the kitty carrier or the car.) :haha:
     
  12. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Lucky you Amy Jo! My two boys (so far anyway..LOL)..haven't come up with children. They both(and their wives)swear they are trying! Maybe someday!

    Unregistered, check out this website. It will cover just about anything you need to know about intestinal parasites etc. If you put a name or initials at the end of your posts, we can call you something besided unregistered ;) . LOL LG

    http://www.thepetcenter.com/exa/worms.html
     
  13. Gayle in LA

    Gayle in LA Well-Known Member

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    <<<<Cat veterinarian here.................THANK YOU LITTLE QUACKER!!!!!! Dear cat owners: Your home is NOT a valid medical quarantine unit. Rabies has been documented in a 17-year-old cat who literally never set foot outside (unfortunately the bat got inside), so you can never anticipate all the scenarios by which your dear little friend might get exposed to deadly diseases. PLEASE vaccinate your cats, at a minimum, against FVRCP( distemper/panleukopenia) and rabies annually(and while you are at it, avail yourself of your vet's offer of an EXAMINATION). I personally think you are extremely foolhardy if you also do not vaccinate against feline leukemia virus (FeLV). It really is true......an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. I should know..........every day I deal with these issues, and I know that as my percentage of patients adequately vaccinated has risen, the incidence of dangerous infectious diseases in these same cats has dropped. Amazing how that works!
     
  14. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Thank YOU Dr. Gayle! Glad you are still out there. LOL If people who think their home can protect against these pathogens would just think about what a maximum hospital quarantine area looks like and how the health workers are dressed(full, self contained haz mat suits) , that might give them an idea just what would be needed for some degree of protection for their indoor pets.

    Happy Spring everyone!!! LQ