cat can't pee

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by steff bugielski, Feb 26, 2005.

  1. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    Does anyone know if a male cat can have and pass a kidney stone. I know from experience that a goat cannot pass one. My male cat, about 5, is having trouble peeing. He looks as if he is in pain. I know people just must suffer and pass the stone, but don't know if he can.
    steff
     
  2. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    No, he won't be able to pass it. This is an EMERGENCY and you should take him to the vet right away. Untreated blocked cats usually die within a couple of days.
     

  3. KindredCanuck

    KindredCanuck In Remembrance

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    Take him to a vet.. yes they can have stones and very painful too..

    KC~
     
  4. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    Take him to the vet, if it is a bladder infection it can kill him in 24 hours!
     
  5. wy0mn

    wy0mn Transplanted RedNeck

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    it's probably a bladder infection. male cats are prone to them, especially as they get older. you will need to find cat food that has a low ash content. ash makes male cats prone to bladder infections. the label will say how much ash is in the food. find the food with the lowest ash content. i think Nine Lives or Meow Mix has a food specially formulated for the prevention of these infections.
     
  6. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    What the others said. Death is because the bladder ruptures.

    Sorry, you need to call the vet today!
     
  7. Phantomfyre

    Phantomfyre Black Cat Farm Supporter

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    Yes - Vet, NOW. If you wait, the situation will get worse fast. It is very common for male cats to get blocked by a kidney stone. Urinary tract infections are also common. He may need surgery. I have a 6-year-old male who has had 5 surgeries for kidney stone blockages and related complications. (He's our child, it was worth it to us.)

    Get him to the vet, find out exactly what's wrong (expect a urinalysis, bloodwork, x-rays and maybe an ultrasound to start), then decide what's right for you, him, and your family. If you decide to proceed with treating him (and the vet may tell you it's risky - it is, but it IS possible for your cat to recover from this - trust me!), please feel free to contact me. I've gotten quite an education on the subject of the male urinary tract, and may have some information that can help you. Or just moral support. :)

    And if you want to talk to me before you make your decision, that's fine, too.

    Hugs, and good luck,
    Diana
    (email and phone numbers removed now that the crisis is past)
     
  8. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Definitely need to go to vet if totally blocked. Way back in early 80s took male cat in to vet. He wasnt totally blocked but urinating was causing him distress. Back then it was a choice of super expensive vet cat food or a pill EVERY day. We chose pill and he learned to like his pill with little nutritional yeast sprinkled on it, so we didnt have to force it down him (that would have been hell for him and us).

    Now even cheap cat foods have a urinary health version (no pricier than other versions), even Walmarts store brand though you'll be lucky to find it in stock. Females can also develope urinary problems and my 15 year old female has been on urinary tract cat food for some time now. Dont know why all cat food isnt made for this condition since its so common.
     
  9. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    Definitely to the vet like everyone else says! Why do emergencies always seem happen on the weekend???? :rolleyes:

    Now to the bulk of my post. If you don't want to read the whole thing, just skip to my main point at the end of this paragraph. ;) The "urinary tract" foods don't help with every of stones or crystal formation (what happens during lots of bladder inflammations/infections). There are two main types of crytals and stones. Calcium oxalate forms in acidic urine (it's more common for this type to be stones) and struvite/triple phosphate forms in alkaline urine. It used to be that "regular" cat food promoted more alkaline urine and lots of cats were getting struvite, so the food companies lowered ash content, etc. to promote more acidic urine. This decreased, but by no means eliminated, struvite formation. Now Calcium oxalate and struvite are seen about 50:50. Because there are the two main types and because they form under such different conditions, any cat with a bladder "infection" (they're usually "inflammations", not infections, because rarely do you culture any bacteria even if they appear to respond to antibiotics :confused: ) should have at minimum a urinalysis to determine urine pH and to check the sediment for crystals. Radiographs and ultrasounds are never a bad idea either. So if anybody read all the way through this mumbo jumbo my main point is: "urinary tract" foods are fine, but don't think that the cat can't have a problem while they are on these foods (I do think they can help a lot cats, just not ALL).

    Hope your kitty is better soon.

    Sarah
     
  10. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Poor cat, it makes me shiver to think of the pain this syndrome involves. Actually, most cystitis in cats involves Bladder Stones and not Kidney Stones. There can be different causes for these problems and one of the things a Doc can do is to determine what the make up of the particular stones is, so that the appropriate steps can be taken and the appropriate diet determined.

    Also, water consumption is important along with decreasing some minerals in the diet and to DECREASE Stress! This is often overlooked. The Doc can guide a person as to the correct approach as for each cat as it varies and treatment is not the same in every case.

    Good luck, it is a difficult thing to watch a kitty go through this.

    LQ
     
  11. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What everyone else said...EMERGENCY VET ASAP!!! A cat with blockage can die within 13 hours. I had a male cat who had this problem...chronic FUS. A change in his diet worked wonders. You also have to encourage them to drink lots of water. Spanky wouldn't eat the canned perscription food so I did some research and discovered the Whiskas in the pouch was the best OTC food for him. He would eat the prescription dry food...loved it in fact.

    If you want to save your cat you must get him medical treatment IMMEDIATELY.
     
  12. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well???

    Did you get your plugged cat to the vet? Is he okay?

    <shudder> Lost my old tom, Vinnie, to FUS. It's really awful. Used to hate to see that port wine urine come into the lab...

    Hope he's doing well.


    Pony!
     
  13. steff bugielski

    steff bugielski Well-Known Member

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    well, yes it was the weekend and no vet for miles. When I woke up on Sat. he seemed fine so I held off. Really fine, playing and rolling on the floor with his buddy. He ate and drank. He went outside. Sunday morning and I think I was mistaken, perhaps he was constipated or ate something funky outside. He is fine. Thanks though for all your advice and concern.
    steff
     
  14. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    I'm so glad to hear he's feeling OK!! :D Hopefully he was just constipated or something, although most young "constipated" male cats are actually plugged. Watch the litter box closely and make sure he is peeing normal sized amounts and that he isn't going in there more frequently than normal.

    Sarah
     
  15. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If memory serves correctly (and as 50 approaches, it serves less well than it used to!), do plugged toms hang their heads over the water bowl (as well as hanging their sore behinds over the box)?
     
  16. GoldenMom

    GoldenMom Well-Known Member

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    I've never heard of them hanging their heads over the water bowl. Usually we just get calls that the cat is "constipated" or keeps going in and out of the box without producing much at all. Sometimes if the owners aren't real observant, we are presented with a cat that's just laying around and maybe vomiting (NOT good news for Mr. Kitty when it's that bad!). Maybe someone else has seen a plugged cat do this?

    Sarah
     
  17. Drizler

    Drizler Well-Known Member

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    We have had several male cats over the years and many got "plugged up" . We started feeding all our cats Purina Special Care which is made just for urinary problems due to high ash content. Since doing that never have had another problem with any of them. You can get it at Walmart and its not expenieve if you buy the big 20 lb bag. Its good for their teeth too .
    The usual sign of urinary tract infection is bloody stool or clearish bloody discharge in the litter box and the cat dragging his rump on the floor like he has an itch he can't scratch.