Cat behavior

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Charleen, Feb 29, 2004.

  1. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    We have a 2 year old fixed male cat. He has a scratching post that he's been using for over a year, but has just lately decided to use the doorway molding. He's still using the original post too.
    The only thing that has changed recently is better weather, so we're tossing him outside when it's nice. Food hasn't changed, litter is the same. No additional cats have been introduced. He's healthy, active & playful.
    Any ideas (short of declawing) to make him stop the scratching on the woodwork and go back to the intended post?

    Thanks
     
  2. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Temporarily cover the area he shouldn't be scratching with some fine-mesh chicken wire or hardware cloth. If you want to lay something on the floor as well and electrify it, well - that would work too. However, just making it impossible for him to scratch there for two or three weeks should work.

    Also check whether the scratching post would still be satisfactory, or whether it needs replacing.
     

  3. Keep your cat indoors and save the life of a songbird!!
     
  4. Stickpaws brand two-sided tape designed specifically for this problem
     
  5. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    If all else fails they have rubber caps you can put on their nails. Please don't declaw the little guy, it is cruel. I have watched them do it before. It is painful for them after surgery, and it messes up their bodies natural balance and alignment after the pain is gone. They remove the equivilant of the tips of your finger from the last joint. :(
     
  6. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    Try duct tape put on so that the sticky side is out. a "curtain" hanging or taped into place top and bottom.
     
  7. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    they make a nasty smelling spray that cats wont get near... my mom uses it in her house I dunno what its called.. she got it at wal mart.
     
  8. mousecat33

    mousecat33 Well-Known Member

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    Flyswatter. Only had to use it once.



    mc
     
  9. Clear plastic tape like the kind you use to tape up packages works well. You just stick it on in long strips to the affected woodwork with the slick side out. Cats don’t seem to like the feeling of the slick plastic cuz they cant get their little mouse hooks into it and will find another area to scratch that has a little more resistance. If the tape is applied with a little care it is almost invisible to the eye. Be very careful when removing the tape as it can take some paint/varnish off if you just try to rip it off. It is better to heat it gently with a hair drier and slowly peel it away.
    If you have some catnip try rubbing some on the scratching post to get kitty interested in it again. Catnip is very easy to grow and you can have all kinds of fun with kitty and catnip. Good luck.
     
  10. Michael W. Smith

    Michael W. Smith Well-Known Member

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    Get a children's water gun, and when kitty decides to scratch where he is not supposed to, spray him. I would think a couple times of this, and he'll decide to go back to the old post.
     
  11. havellostmywings

    havellostmywings Well-Known Member

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    He is marking territory...

    Cats have scent glands in their feet, cheeks, as well as being able to spray... now you have had him fixed, so he no longer sprays...

    a squirt bottle with water and a dash of white vinegar will discourage him greatly... as well as maybe giving him some other kind of diversion to distract him from the woodwork...

    Lynn in texas
     
  12. Eileen

    Eileen Active Member

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    ooops wrong thread...sorry.