Cast-iron Seasoning: Vote for your grease of choice

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by snoozy, Dec 5, 2006.

Which grease do you use for seasoning cast-iron?

  1. Beef tallow

  2. Deer fat

  3. Lard

  4. Bacon fat

  5. Crisco

  6. Olive oil

  7. Peanut oil

  8. Corn or other vegetable oil

  9. Other (please enlighten us in a post!)

  10. I'm hoping to figure it out soon...

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  1. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Looking at the thread on which grease to use for seasoning cast-iron, I was struck with how all over the shortening map the posts were. So let's just see how it all shakes out statistically -- just for fun!
     
  2. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    How bout WD40.

    big rockpile
     

  3. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Guest

    I prefer lard if I happen to have any when it's needed, but I've use all sorts of oils and fats. Generally speaking the more saturated the fat the better so far as my experience is concerned.

    .....Alan.
     
  4. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    Lard makes me want to hurl up a lung. I can smell that stuff when it's included in food..ahhhhhhhh ewy.

    My dad taught me to use olive or vegetable oil and it does a good job.

    Kat
     
  5. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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  6. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    There's a little butcher shop in our nearby town that serves up fantastic hamburgers and french fries. These french fries taste the way that McDonald's and many others made theirs before lard became such a bad name. French fries cooked in real lard is a true delicacy, IMO. There is a difference, believe me.

    That said, while I prefer lard for seasoning my skillet, I refuse to go out of my way to buy a big can of it just for that. And Lord knows, I don't need all of those bad fats clogging up my arteries any more than they are. So I will use whatever I have on hand - usually olive oil or canola oil. But they don't seem to work as well.

    I've asked Santa to bring me a new 12" pre-seasoned Lodge skillet for Christmas, since my old one has had a crack in it for many years. It will take a while for it to become "truly" seasoned, though.
     
  7. Silvercreek Farmer

    Silvercreek Farmer Living the dream. Supporter

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    No lie, I think that would work, I believe you can use WD40 on food service equipment as long as you let it dry. I have heard that it is fish oil disolved in a petroleum carrier, and once the carrier evaporates, you are good to go...
     
  8. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    Chicken fried steak cooked in real lard......sinful good!

    We own quite a few pieces of the Lodge Logic pre-seasoned cast iron and it does take quite a bit of use to really season it. It's kind of like giving the seasoning a head start.
     
  9. MullersLaneFarm

    MullersLaneFarm Well-Known Member

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    lard and bacon fat are essentially the same (rendered hog fat)

    There are two types of shortening - 'all vegetable' (ala Crisco) and 'creamed shortening' more akin to beef tallow
     
  10. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

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    I think the bacon fat has a lot more salt in it, and I think it helps. My favorite way to season or re-season a cast iron pan is to fry a pound of bacon in the pan! It works!

    MaryNY
     
  11. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Lard and bacon fat the same!! Au contraire! Bacon fat has salt and other seasonings in it, lard does not. I would think that would make a difference in seasoning iron, due to the rust factor...
     
  12. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    As I posted on simular thread, I have heard of using bees wax to season cast iron. Sounds intriguing though I havent tried it. Not even sure where to get bees wax unless I buy a special candle or something.

    As is, I just use the cast iron skillet. Dont have an oven that it would fit in. Mostly cook with olive oil and I dont have too much problem. It builds up a carbon layer.
     
  13. MullersLaneFarm

    MullersLaneFarm Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm, bacon has salt in it, eh? .... didn't know that but then we haven't bought bacon from the store in 4 years since we raise our own.
     
  14. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The solid shortening preferers are quite in the majority, although one of the links posted here (or was it on the other thread?...) was a strong proponent of vegetable/liquid oils. Interesting...
     
  15. TxGypsy

    TxGypsy Well-Known Member

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    I normally use veg oil but that's because I do it a bit differently than most people. When I get a new piece of cast iron I use it for frying for the next couple of months(fish and taters mostly,deep frying). Absolutely the best way I've found for seasoning.
     
  16. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    I use lard.
    As far as bacon goes........we raise hogs, butcher and cure/brine our own bacon and hams.
    Bacon is cured......either in brine or dry cure, using salt and other spices. If the bacon is not cured, it's called fresh side. (which is still tasty). :)
     
  17. Silvercreek Farmer

    Silvercreek Farmer Living the dream. Supporter

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    As far as beeswax goes, beeswax is the traditional coating for wrought iron. The piece of iron is heated up and then rubbed in wax, it gives it that black varnishy look. May work pretty well on a pan...
     
  18. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yeah, but should we be eating wax?