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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!
I have a question about cast iron kettles. I bought on last winter to keep on the wood stove to humidify the air a little.


Now as our wood stove is usually going 24/7, i thought I might as well heat water for tea and dishes on it. Problem is, even if I buy another kettle like this one, how do you prevent it from getting all rusty and gross on the inside?
What am I doing wrong?

Thanks,
Aly
 

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Happy Scrounger
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about the only thing I know to do for them is to season it with olive oil...350degree oven for a couple hours. Lard works well if you have it.

I don't know if it will help over the long haul tho. probably have to reseason every couple of months.

Hopefully someone else here will have a better answer for you (and me)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the input though!! WOw, didn't realize I didn't resize the picture! I'll do that now before someone on dial-up hates me!!
 

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If you season it on the inside, you will get oil in your tea water. Japanese traditionally use cast iron teapots, but they dry them out thoroughly after every use. Probably the rust got started when there was water in it when the woodstove cooled off. I think you've either got to keep it hot or you've got to thoroughly dry it out.
 

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If you want to keep a constant source of hot water on the woodstove for tea and coffee, I'd suggest using a stainless steel, graniteware or enamalware pot. These type of pots won't get rusty like cast iron will.

No matter what type of pot you use, you'll get scale and mineral buildup on the inside unless you flush the pot out on a daily basis (or use distilled water).
 

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If you want to keep a constant source of hot water on the woodstove for tea and coffee, I'd suggest using a stainless steel, graniteware or enamalware pot. These type of pots won't get rusty like cast iron will.

No matter what type of pot you use, you'll get scale and mineral buildup on the inside unless you flush the pot out on a daily basis (or use distilled water).
I agree! Cast iron as great as it is, it hates water.
 

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If you want to keep a constant source of hot water on the woodstove for tea and coffee, I'd suggest using a stainless steel, graniteware or enamalware pot. These type of pots won't get rusty like cast iron will.

No matter what type of pot you use, you'll get scale and mineral buildup on the inside unless you flush the pot out on a daily basis (or use distilled water).
This is probably the best advice I've seen, for 2 reason..

one the kettle won't rust and the other one is
Where was the cast iron kettle made? We use the same style on our coal stove to put some humidity back into the air. They are fairly cheap and made in China, they also state somewhere on the packaging that they are not to be used for drinking water or food products...

I would imagine they are not real quality castiron and may contain other products.. I know they don't compare in quality to any of the castiron pots or pans we use on a daily basis...
 

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i third CabinFevers advice

personaly i have a cheap 8 quart stock pot that is a near constant fixture on my stove and a corningware 9 (it holds more than 9 cups with out the basket ) cup percolater , usualy with the perk basket and stem removed i flush it daily and use it for tea water and so on and about 3 times a day dump it into the stock pot , rince and refill it that seems to be often enought it doens't get a bad build up of calcium
 

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They are fairly cheap and made in China, they also state somewhere on the packaging that they are not to be used for drinking water or food products...

I would imagine they are not real quality castiron and may contain other products.. I know they don't compare in quality to any of the castiron pots or pans we use on a daily basis...
yup, yup.

Stick with SS or graniteware (be sure the enamel is not chipped)
 
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