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Ok I totally forgot about my carrots. WE have had a week of below freezing temps. The ground is now thawing. Is it worth mulching them or should I just dig them up and can them?
 

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Ok I totally forgot about my carrots. WE have had a week of below freezing temps. The ground is now thawing. Is it worth mulching them or should I just dig them up and can them?
Do you normally have them mulched at this time of the year and they survive?

If so, I would pull a few and see what kind of condition they are in. If they look a little frost bitten pull them out. If they look fine, mulch them and proceed as normal.

TRellis
 

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IF the carrots froze dig what you can use. Keep watch on the rest. If the ones you dig go limp the rest will too if they stay thawed for a while. It depends on how bad they froze. Me I would dig and process if I wanted carrots....James
 

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I normally have them mulched before December, but we normally remain above freezing , for the most part till then.
Guess I will plan on digging and processing. Too bad, it is so nice to just dig all winter long and have fresh carrots!
 

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I normally have them mulched before December, but we normally remain above freezing , for the most part till then.
Guess I will plan on digging and processing. Too bad, it is so nice to just dig all winter long and have fresh carrots!
I do have another somewhat similar question....

I have never before mulched over carrots and left them in the ground into winter. I have always just pulled them and either ate them or stored them.

My question is, what is the benefit of leaving them in the ground and mulching them? Do they continue to grow? Does growth slow significantly?

The reason that I ask is because I have a row or two of carrots that I planted maybe a little too late in the fall and I am hoping that I can leave them in the ground to grow out and therefore be larger than they are now when I harvest them.

I live in an 8a zone so the ground really does not freeze very deeply and if it does it does not stay frozen for very long. I have a cold frame that I use to grow greens (lettuce, chard, spinach, kale) throughout the winter and to be honest I find myself more concerned about overheating during the day than freezing over night.

Should I just heavily mulch with straw and they will be fine unless I get an extended cold spell? Or, is there a point of diminishing returns for wintering carrots even in zone 8a?

TRellis
 

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I do have another somewhat similar question....

I have never before mulched over carrots and left them in the ground into winter. I have always just pulled them and either ate them or stored them.

My question is, what is the benefit of leaving them in the ground and mulching them? Do they continue to grow? Does growth slow significantly?

The reason that I ask is because I have a row or two of carrots that I planted maybe a little too late in the fall and I am hoping that I can leave them in the ground to grow out and therefore be larger than they are now when I harvest them.

I live in an 8a zone so the ground really does not freeze very deeply and if it does it does not stay frozen for very long. I have a cold frame that I use to grow greens (lettuce, chard, spinach, kale) throughout the winter and to be honest I find myself more concerned about overheating during the day than freezing over night.

Should I just heavily mulch with straw and they will be fine unless I get an extended cold spell? Or, is there a point of diminishing returns for wintering carrots even in zone 8a?

TRellis
Does anyone have an explanation and/or answer???

TRellis
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The benefit for me is space. By leaving them in the ground and mulching, I can dig them anytime and have fresh carrots. No different than putting them in a root cellar except I do not have a root cellar.
 
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