Careful with those cows!

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Jena, Mar 17, 2005.

  1. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I posted about this nut case last year, but hubby didn't believe me. I wanted to sell her, he wouldn't do it.

    So...I go out this morning and there a cow lying by the fence with the calf on the other side. No big deal. I walk out there on the calf side of the fence with the idea of pushing him back through. Here she comes. Wham into the fence. "Ah-ha! I remember you!" I went to get back-up.

    Hubby still wasn't believing me, so he starts to walk out there. Cow doesn't hit the fence this time, she just gets her head through and starts pushing the wires. Hubby backs off. Our fences just aren't good enough to bet your life on. He's becoming a believer.

    I was going to take my truck out there, but wasn't sure if the insurance would cover cow collision with our own cow, so we get the tractor instead. Good thing too, because she would have done a number on my toyota truck.

    We get the tractor along the fence with the idea of pushing the calf back through, then vacating the premises. Momma is trying every way she can to get past that tractor. I'm pulling up, pulling back, raising and lowering the loader to keep her at bay. As soon as we get the calf through the fence, here she comes...she shoved herself between the tractor and a fence post so she could....try to kill the darn calf! We smacked her with a stick a few times until she backed off. We got the calf around back of the tractor and the b*t*h starts ramming him into the wheels.

    I'm hanging out the back window with a stick, hubby is down on the bale forks with a stick and all she wants to do is kill that calf! Hubby gets mad and takes the tractor after her. I thought he was going to spear her on the bale spear. I'm talking calmly..."Honey, your angry, please be careful. How are we going to get a cow off the bale spear if you do stick her???" He calms down, but the cow has taken a smack with the loader and is keeping her distance. We put the calf in the bucket and take it in.

    I gave it some colostrum, fed the cows and let things simmer down for about an hour. Put the calf back out, nice and quietly. Just shove him out there and go hide in the shed so she can't see me. He starts wandering around bawling...here she comes. He tries to run away from her and Wham. She starts in again trying to kill him. We are nowhere in sight, the other cows are looking at her like she's nuts, then they go running off to find their calves because they think there's some big threat going on. She gets everyone stirred up, meanwhile the calf is in a little pile in the corner of the fence.

    We go retrieve the calf again, this time with two vehicles...tractor to chase the cow and truck to snatch the calf. It just happens to be sale barn day....off he goes. We don't have time for a bottle baby, nor to mess with a lunatic cow. All this took about 4 hours as it was.

    This is the weirdest cow I've ever seen. She was fine with her first calf. No problem at all. The second one last year, she kind of shoved it around a bit, but calmed down and was a decent mom. This year she is just plain homicidal. The rest of the year, she's an ordinary, well-behaved cow. You'd never even guess that she could turn so vicious! Talk about post partum depression or whatever.

    At least hubby believes me this time. She will be hamburger within a month. I won't sale barn her because she'll kill someone. Like I said, you'd never guess that she'd be so looney the minute she drops a calf. That calf only brought $113, better than nothing, but probably doesn't cover the cost of feeding that **** all year.

    SELL LOONEY COWS! They aren't worth it.

    Jena
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    When I first shifted from hogs to cattle I bought into a number of cattle that had bad habits. Since I work alone there were a few times I was concerned for my safety. I bought a wand, a heavy duty stun gun thingy, that meter readers use to keep dogs off them. As I worked the cattle, those that showed behavior such as you experienced got a one way trip tp the sale barn. I think this is a learned trait in behavior and as I ridded the farm of these animals the remaining herd mellowed. Today, I have no trouble processing a calf in the open pasture as moma will just stand a few feet to away and watch. I agree, there are too many risks on the farm to tolerate uncontrolable cattle. Cash the check for the calf and be glad when the cow is gone. If she stayed, the next time you may not be as lucky.
     

  3. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    in our younger years my brother and i used to work the neighbours purebred angus. the bulls were sweethearts ,you kept your eye on them only cause they think you are as big as them and would brush by you going were ever . the cows fit your description to a t!! were talking multi thousand dollar show cows that were born and bred on a halter. give them hormones from calving they grow horns a breath fire!! we tag teamed to vaccinate the calves when they were hours old .one would distract the cow and weild a 2x4 to belt her if she decided to go checkout the neeedler. got so we could jab the calf and vault the 6 ft fence in ago.when we got older would lure the cow into a squeeze and do what we had to . though once had a cow get her feet on the ground and throw the squeeze.she will taste good on the q! no matter how old she is the prime steak should still be good.
     
  4. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I don't know where this cow could have learned this. I bought her as a bred heifer along with most of the other cows out there. None of them are like this. There is another one that will come running to see what's up with a calf, but she will back off as soon as you yell or throw your hands up at her. A few will circle around and act nervous, but none of them have ever tried to take me, let alone the tractor!

    I don't know what her problem is, but I will take great satisfaction in grilling her.

    Jena
     
  5. herefordman

    herefordman Well-Known Member

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    Think I would have kept the calf and sent that little S**T to the sale barn.
    I've had both bulls and cows that get a little randy, they don't stay long with that kind of behavior here.
    Like you say, she'll taste just fine !!!
     
  6. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    Remember, humans can be the nice, oh Im a good person. Next thing you know, they are wanted for murder. Same with any animal, whether it is dogs, cats, heck even a horse. They can snap, and go nuts. Some people have raised bulls as pets, only to be killed by them. Some have raised fido as a pet, only to have it maul the neighbors kid. Felines can be all purring on second, then flip out, scratch you and maybe give you a nice infection. Any animal that is nice, can flip out, snap etc. We have one that doesn't take to her calves, but doesn't try to kill it. She buts it, but she also looks for it. I think I know the problem with her, humans. We are putting her up way out of sight of any human, and see what happens. Last year, she had a calf here in the barn yard, didn't take it. Previous year, had one wayyyy up back, she took to it. In fact she ran from the section near the road, all the way up to where her calf was. I found it, it yelled so she got nervous.


    We had a bull once, he was friendly. But he liked to throw the bale rack around the barn yard. We sold him..


    Jeff
     
  7. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Temperment is a very big culling factor with me.

    On calves through the fence, I've simply stopped worrying about it. When it gets hungry it will find its way back through the fence.

    For those new to cattle, I don't care if you raised him as a bottle calf. Never trust a bull. They can be babies for years and then one day kill you for no apparent reason.

    Ken Scharabok
     
  8. lilsassafrass

    lilsassafrass Well-Known Member

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    That momma will behave very well as one pound packages in the freeze !!

    I just this fall rid myself of a 3 year old that actually was in our show string , and had been fairly good natured , third fair into her first year , she took exception to the wash rack ... adn on the return trip to our stalling area she tried to attack a stroller and innocent bystanders ... she didnt make contact .. adn it took me a while to get her the 30 or so feet back to her spot
    but she never changed her opinion about people after that .. the rest of teh fair i bucket watered her and scratched her from her class ...
    we had a weak break so the cows went home .. she had two more fairs to go .. kept her tied .. and she gave me horrid greif moving her about in the barn .. i was optimistic till the morning we laoded for teh next fair .. it took 2 people with leads and hooked to the tractor .. to lead he to the trailer ... herself trying to climb up onto the tractor when sdhe wasnt trying to kill one of the folks on either side of her...decided at theat point she wasnt going to change (you can tell I am nothing but optimistic ) and we took her back to the loafing pen , turned her loose (and that wass tricky mind you ) and she didnt go .. believe it or not as we were loading the rest of teh cows .. she came up and wanted to be scrtached ...
    she was fine as long as she wasnt tied .. I calved her out .. we shall see on the calf after all her mother was fine I never figured out what set her off
    but she dows taste good ...
     
  9. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Ken, you and I cull the same way, I can forgive a lot of sins but temperament is not one of them. We've been selling registered cattle for many years and I feel that one of the reasons we have such a great reputation is because we don't keep the crazy ones around and they never turn up at a sale, we simply call the butcher.
     
  10. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    I would enjoy eating every bite of that witch. Mean animals don't stay here , it is not worth someones life. I had a picture in my head of the cow on the spear. You could of always gutted her and built a fire :haha: . Glad you are OK.
     
  11. SkyOne

    SkyOne Active Member

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    I'm sure glad this thread was posted but sorry to hear about your experience with the cow and calf. Makes you feel like you've lost a years worth of labor and money. Two weeks ago I sorta forced my husband to get rid of a top notch looking yearling heifer. She was 1/3 angus and the rest was Gelbvieh. I halter trained her and worked at trying to gentle her. She was a nut case. At times she was the sweetest thing and you could do anything with her. But she could turn her personality on and off. I still have a shoulder injury that hasn't healed because of her deciding to just high tail it to the back pasture with me holding the lead rope. Pretty as she was I didn't like or trust her. Naturally, she was in one of her sweet moods when he would tend the cows...he is a sometimes weekender at that job because he works. I tend the cows. Just so happened that the sale was the day after she tried to butt and kick him in the barn. He stuck up for her until I stated I was going to shoot her with the 22 if he didn't get her off the property. Since she has left my herd has returned to normal. I can walk out and call and they come running to be petted. I happened to pick up a Santa Gertrudis heifer to nurse out on a Jersey. That was a deal as both sire and dam came off King Ranch where the breed originated. That is his replacement heifer for his beef stock. She is the sweetest laid back little girl on the place. Follows him around like a puppy and loves to be with us. Started her halter training yesterday. Within 15 minutes she was leading and allowing me to pretend milking her. Not that she will be milked but just in case I ever have to pull her milk. She stands for her feet to be picked up also. This one is a keeper. I really felt that when the black one calved we would really have trouble. Never thought of her attacking the calf though. That sounds like a psycho cow. I've seen inbred horses like that, dogs and rabbits like that. For your sake glad you got rid of her. And glad your hubby was there during all this. Sky
     
  12. SkyOne

    SkyOne Active Member

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    ooops...we got rid of the black heifer two months ago not two weeks. Should have proof read what I wrote. :eek:
     
  13. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    Jena, I remember your earlier thread about this cow. YIKES!!!

    I'm a vegetarian but I think even I'd be tempted to eat her! :yeeha:
     
  14. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    I'm with Ken and also with agmantoo to an extent. Cattle are bigger and stronger and faster than people. You can't afford the risks of a bad attitude unless you're set up to "handle" them hands-off, as wild animals; and you don't get the financial reward from ordinary cattle to be able to afford that, As Ken said, use attitude as a culling factor for breeding too. Mental/ psychological/ attitude factors are inheritable to a degree, and you don't want to be dealing with the grandchildren and greatgranchildren generations untold of bad-attitude animals. Not only is it dangerous, but it just plain costs too much with each and every succeeding generation. You make more money with placid, tractable livestock than with wild, high-strung would-be killers.
     
  15. KesWindhunter

    KesWindhunter Well-Known Member

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    I raise commercial angus cattle and temperament is one of my first culling tools, also. I feel fortunate that as a child I raised and showed Horned Herefords so I 'know' how a cow should/could act...Nothin' better than a good ol' Hereford! I just can't and won't out-run or out-climb a rank range cow. I also never keep replacement heifers from my herd until the momma cow is a 4 year old (3rd calving). I feel that temperament is hereditary and by the time the cow has calved 3 times, she has jumped through all of my hoops and made the grade and so I'll then give her offspring the same chance :yeeha: . A good dispositioned cow will usually have a good dispositioned calf, and those calves are what the feeders want. Heck, they're the kind I want! They are the calves that just wory where their next meal comes from and usually grade out better and quicker than the flighty or rank ones.
    When the odd heifer or 3 year old (or any cow) beats up her calf and I can't get them to come together (head catch: check the udder for inflamation, milk out the cow, check the teats for cuts, check the calfs teeth...they can be super sharp and will cut the cows teats near the attachment to the udder, and the cow WILL learn to hate her calf if it is hurting her...and a file works fine on sharp teeth), I will bum and raise the calf and cull the cow. I put the 'drys' out on decent range until right before the 4th of July and sell 'em as burger. What is sad is when some order buyer buys the cow to put on grass with a bull and then sells the bred cow in the fall that shoulda been bar-b-qued on the 4th of July.
    Kestrel
     
  16. opus

    opus Well-Known Member

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    Ahhh.....angus/salers cross cattle, those were the days, what memories. Anyone want to see the scars?
     
  17. KesWindhunter

    KesWindhunter Well-Known Member

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    We could always compare scars...I fondly think of them as war injuries...

    Salers! Ya gotta love that breed dontcha? NOT! They can clear a 7' high corral fence flat footed jumping uphill, and they are always lookin' for a good fight. If someone could just find a way to harness all that energy...
     
  18. milkstoolcowboy

    milkstoolcowboy Farmer

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    I used to AI all of my beef cows, and there's an enterprise that will get you to cull on temperment in a hurry.

    I had a Charolais cow go in the breeding chute and right out the front over the top (about 6 and a half feet high) She then proceeded to make pretzels of various cattle panels and tube gates. She went to market at weaning time. I had another Charolais heifer I was feeding out, she'd come up and eat at the bunk, but every time I walked the lot, she'd run down to the far end like she was possessed. Always found them to be a bit on the flighty side.

    I've hand-milked Herefords that were as docile as could be, but I've seen a couple Hereford cows put ring men up in the seats at the sale barn. It's amazing how far a man can fly.
     
  19. LuckyGRanch

    LuckyGRanch Well-Known Member

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    :haha: :haha: Jena...the mental images you gave are priceless! :haha: :haha:

    Certain cows (and people!) simply shouldn't be allowed to reproduce! :waa:
     
  20. shorty'smom

    shorty'smom Well-Known Member

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    why sure! Nervous, flighty, ornery, and looking for a fight, type cattle do not gain weight like placid, calm cattle. Last week at the sale barn I saw the awfullest milk cow. She was CRAZY. She had been so neglected (presumably because nobody could get near this girl without getting killed) her udder was hugely swollen and hanging down. she looked like she had huge open, black sores all over it. she was nothing but skin and bones and she threw up dirt just because I looked at her from 30 feet and 3 pens away. Nearby her was one of the largest angus bulls I have ever seen. His hooves must have been about the size of dinnerplates. He just calmly stood there chewing his cud. I was just on the other side of a pipe corral fence from him. He was calmer than some of the horses the men were using to move the cattle around.