Cardboard garden update

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by DayBird, Nov 11, 2005.

  1. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I spread layers of cardboard about an inch thick - 4 or 5 layers. I then put down cardboard boxes that were not flattened. They're about 30 inches square and about 18 inches deep. In the bottom of the boxes, I put about two inches of newspaper and put composted leaves and chicken bedding on top of that. I filled them up to within about three inches of the top.

    The spinach and kale have sprouted. The garlic is up and growing. The cabbages are taking off. I'm so proud. I hope they all live long enough to be ripped from the ground, chopped up, exposed to heat and eaten by the humans.
     
  2. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I never thought of filling the boxes and gardening in them! What a brilliant idea!
     

  3. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Others here have warned that the boxes will deteriate and fall apart, exposing the roots. I'm just trying this out. We'll see how things progress through the winter. At any rate, rotting cardboard should make good compost. If it all does fall apart, I'll just mound up the resulting compost and plant on the top of the heap.

    I am starting to save the 18 inch cube boxes that we throw away at work. I'm planning on placing them two deep to form a 36 inch wind bed and make it as long as I choose at the time. I'll fill them up with composted chicken litter and put a single tomato plant in each one. That's my plan for now. I'm sure it'll change before spring.
     
  4. LisaT30

    LisaT30 Member

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    I love what you're doing! We like to layer newspapers, manure, compost, etc... and then put a layer of soil on top to plant in. (lasagna gardening) Its amazing how the plants respond to it. Hope your plants do great!
     
  5. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Sounds lovely. Now if you have a plan for keeping the darling poultry in their own half acre pen and OUT OF MY GARDEN, I'd like to hear it.
     
  6. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I think you need a six feet high fence, at least, for your poultry with flight netting over top of that. Then fence the garden in and put flight netting over that. And turn a couple of big, hungry dogs loose between the two.

    Did I ever write about my experience trying to raise rabbits in a colony on the ground? Well, to make it short, there are still two dutch does living under the parrot house that won't let me catch them. Water hoses, fish nets, slingshots, nada.

    We woke up this morning to find that all of the cabbages have been eaten to the ground. Sure, something else could have done it, but I blame those rabbits. The garlic is growing in the same boxes as the kale and spinach, which is probably why they haven't eaten those...yet.
     
  7. ajaxlucy

    ajaxlucy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Gardening in cardboard boxes? I'm going to try it. Ideas like this are one reason I like this site. Thanks
     
  8. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Robert, I have sneaky chickens. They wait till the turkeys have me distracted then make a break for it thru the gate. They sneak up behind me quietly and the second they see they can get out, zip right thru.

    The turks broke the top off the gate AGAIN yesterday. I put a new top on last nite, AGAIN. Naughty things try to land on top of the 4 ft gate and hit the added top and snap the support legs. I might have to get rebar to use. That'll larn 'em suckers!
     
  9. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Have you tried clipping the flight feathers? That'll ground them.


    Try a big roasting pan, some sage and butter and a hot oven. "That'll larn 'em suckers!" :goodjob:
     
  10. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I have clipped wings to no avail. And the chickens are running out, not flying. LOL I think I am going to have to put a 'foyer' on the pen.

    It is mostly the hen turks going over the gate. And they know I won't be eating them. Now the jakes are another matter entirely. I have 9 jakes and 5 hens, alas. I thought one of the jakes was a hen, but he was just small. He now has a beard. So, I'm planning to build a smoker and we are having smoked turkey for Thanksgiving. Shall I set 4 extra places? We will be having my special rice and fruit dressing, Granny Pearl's candied sweet potatoes, Edna Ruth's famous green beans (my mom), pecan pie and iced tea.
     
  11. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Sounds wonderful. If I ever make it to Texas, I probably will never want to leave. Too bad it's such a long drive, or we would be there. Maybe you can send me the recipe for the dressing?
     
  12. mamacags

    mamacags Well-Known Member

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    For some reason we have a ton of cardboard every week come garbage day. I have a super shredder for my important papers. Here is my idea and I wanna know if anyone thinks it will work........

    This will be a first garden on this property. I want to shred the cardboard down to nothing and stick it in with my shredded leaves in the compost pile. I also was thinking of adding in shredded very important papers. Will these things compost down enough to use them in the spring? What do you think?
     
  13. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    You will need to add something to 'heat it up' as well as the paper and leaves. Horse or cow or chicken poo would be good.
     
  14. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Robert, you should sell your place in Alabama and come to Texas! Why haven't you?

    I'll have to write the recipe down next time I make it. I'll have to measure amts as I do it. I'm a 'dump and taste' cook.
     
  15. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    I spread mine directly under the plants,makes a clean bed for veggies to lie on,and for some reasons slugs dont bother them.Also compost it too,it works well,but never timed it,its a constant pile that just gets turned until i need a few scoops.

    Im also a cardboard shredder,its a winner for sure.
     
  16. MaKettle

    MaKettle Well-Known Member

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    Shredded paper composts as readily as hay. Town Friend saves her shreddings, and I use them to top the compost pile when kitchen scraps get too thick, and also for bedding in the barn. The little shreds of plastic from envelope windows do not break down, however, but do not seem to harm anything in the garden.

    We had file cabinets and shelves full of papers, notebooks full of paper, cardboard boxes full of newsletters and magazines when we retired. Shredding them was tedious. Hauled them out to the flower border and used them for mulch topped with wood chips. Took half inch thick magazines one season to disappear.