canning meat

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by petefarms, Sep 3, 2005.

  1. petefarms

    petefarms Well-Known Member

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    would like to know how anyone can's meat, my wife would like to try some different methods. thanks.
     
  2. A couple of years ago I canned some venison. cut it up into about 1" chunks and placed it in wide mouth canning jars. It turned out real good the kids and I really liked it. I planning on coarse grinding venison this nest time and can it for quick meals that use hamburger. Also this last year I experimented with canning sausage in lard. Just fry up the sausage and place it in wide mouth jars and fill with hot lard. Place the lid and ring on it and when it cools down it will create its own vacuum and seal the jar. It has worked out really good too. I plan to do a lot of deer sausage this way this next season. Hopefully!

    When I was growing up my mom use to can fish with the bones in it. I just loved it. Haven't had any home canned fish since I was a kid tho. Also she use to can chicken too. I also have plans this next fall to try canning squirrels and see how they do. From what I've read just about any small game is good for canning. Good luck!
     

  3. True2Spirit

    True2Spirit Well-Known Member

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    A little tip. When canning Venison, add beef boullion cubes! For a pint use a 1/2 cube and a quart use the whole cube, place in the bottom of the jar and fill with cubed deer meat, half way add a bit of tallow then fill with more meat, I add a little water too. Using a quart jar I put a little more tallow on top of the meat, then add salt. So nummy and versatile!!! I left my complete instructions at work, had some Ladies wanting the recipe, I'll bring it home tomorrow if you're interested, I do the Cold-pack Method.

    Lisa
     
  4. bearkiller

    bearkiller Well-Known Member

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    Since I have only a tiny freezer in my refer I usually can up a lot of meat. Last bear I put up, most went to "stew meat" in size and into a big pot to heat. Once hot, but still pretty pink, into the canning jars for 90 min at 15 lbs. OK! Some of it went to neighbor who does have a freezer...but I never see much of that again. It's like a black hole down there sometimes.

    But there is no reason to turn it all into "stew meat". As long as a single chunk of meat can fit into a wide mouth jar (will you ever be sorry if you do this and DONT use wide mouth) there is no problem canning it up.

    I normally do not season first.

    Later, I also make stock out of all the bones and can up the stock for use making soups or the liquid for rice, etc.

    Meat comes out fall apart tender and mighty good.

    bearkiller
     
  5. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

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    Please be sure to PRESSURE CAN meat -- not hot water bath!! That's a big no-no! Hot water bath would never be able to heat a big hunk of meat through to the right temperature. (The sausage preserving tip is okay though, 'cause it's cooked and stored in the cooking grease and/or lard.)

    I don't think anyone has mentioned making jerky yet! That's a good way to preserve meat, as well, and not too difficult. Good luck!

    MaryNY
     
  6. True2Spirit

    True2Spirit Well-Known Member

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    I DO NOT use "big hunks of meat". They are cubed to about 1 inch in diameter. Pressure canners have they safety issues as well. THE most important thing when canning any method is to CLEAN and STERLIZE properly......
     
  7. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, True2Spirit, but you were not the only one to post a response. If you check, you will see where Bearkiller posted:

    As long as a single chunk of meat can fit into a wide mouth jar (will you
    ever be sorry if you do this and DONT use wide mouth) there is no problem
    canning it up.

    And, THAT is what I had in mind when I wrote that.

    I thought your tip about adding a boullion cube was a good one.

    MaryNY
     
  8. pyper7

    pyper7 pyper7

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    Just a note about chicken canning, too. I watch the supermarkets for sales on boneless skinless chicken breasts and buy it up to can. I cut it into chunks, boil it and can it with fresh water, onion and celery. We use it for quick meals with rice, noodles, soup, fajitas and sandwiches. My pressure cooker only holds 4 quarts and it's slow going for large quantities, but well worth the work.
     
  9. rzrubek

    rzrubek Flying Z

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    Here is a true story about waterbath canning and botulism, I think it speaks for itself.

    Botulism: It Only Takes A Taste
    By Elizabeth L. Andress.
    It only took a little! This is the message behind the story of Loretta Boberg, a 62-year old woman from Wisconsin who always tastes food before serving it to company. In this case, the company can be very thankful she did.
    When Mrs. Boberg opened a jar of home-canned carrots in January of that year, she dipped in a finger to taste the juice. Not liking the taste, she served home-canned beans to her guests instead. Within two days, Mrs. Boberg became dizzy and had difficulty walking.
    At first, hospital staff thought she had suffered a stroke because of her slurred speech and muscle weakness. The doctor did ask her if she had eaten any spoiled food lately, however. Too weak to speak, Mrs. Boberg wrote "carrots" on a piece of paper.
    If this physician had not suspected botulism, even though he had seen only a few cases, Mrs. Boberg would probably have died. The toxin moved through the respiratory system, paralyzing her muscles. A sample from the jar was fed to a laboratory mouse and it died instantly. A sample of Mrs. Boberg's blood was given to another mouse and it too died instantly.
    The road to recovery for this lady was very slow. Six months later, she remained in the hospital on a respirator, still being fed intravenously. She had stood for only three minutes since the incident, and talked through a tube in her trachea when not out of breath. Muscle movement was returning slowly with the help of physical therapy. Hospital officials estimated that her bill was running about $200,000.
    These results are a terrible tragedy, but they could be even worse, botulism is fatal in many cases. Mrs. Boberg used a boiling water canner for the carrots that gave her botulism. Yes, this was the same method she had used and only by luck had gotten away with for the past 44 years. This year she was not so lucky.
    If, like Mrs. Boberg, you are canning low-acid foods such as vegetables (except tomatoes), red meats, seafood, and poultry in a boiling water canner or by the open kettle method, you may wish to think twice before taking another chance.
     
  10. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I second what MaryNY said. Pressure can the meat. Pressure canners are not that hard to use and they are safer than you may think. I've (accidentally) wandered off while canning corn and come back to find the pressure entering the "danger zone". The pressure safety was working to exhaust and reduce pressure. Now, I DON'T recommend this as a safety test :eek: , but it does tell you that pressure canning is pretty darn safe. It is also the only method to bring the temp of the liquid in your jars above 212 degrees. Water boils at 212 and the temp doesn't get any higher than that no matter how long you boil it. Basic science. The water in your meat (or whatever) will not go above 212 without putting it under pressure. Botulism spores are not killed at 212. They are anaerobic, which means they thrive and multiply in an atmosphere without oxygen, such as your vacuum sealed jars. So, even though the chances are that you MAY get away with waterbath canning, I , for one, would rather not take that chance. My life and my family/friend's lives are too important to me.

    Another thing, slightly off topic. If you have a jar of food you are suspicious of, dispose of it in a way that none of your animals can get into it. They can get botulism, too.
     
  11. Sparkey

    Sparkey Well-Known Member

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  12. True2Spirit

    True2Spirit Well-Known Member

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    Hi Mary - Thank you for pointing that out, I didn't see Bearkillers reply. Boy, that's what happens when one assumes....sorry. And yes, the boullion cubes makes fabulous gravy and an excellent base for stews!!! :)

    I agree with the article that rzrubek submitted. I only can Salsa, Tomatoes and meat with the Cold - pack method, I am over it like a watch dog to make sure a steady boil and the alloted time is achieved. As far as veggies, I vacuum pack them and freeze. I am scared to DEATH of a pressure canner, have seen devasting accidents involving those.

    But to advise anyone starting off to can, Cold-pack method probably is not the first choice, one needs to be very diligent about sterilization and the proper tasks need to be implemented. What comes to mind in todays world is about how to save time etc. It's the old-fashioned way, but things where far different then as apposed to todays world.
     
  13. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    I can chicken. Boneless, cooked chicken in broth. In a pressure canner. I realize that the old types were pretty scary, but the newer ones are much safer! Safer than riding in a car with my MIL driving, that's for sure! ;)

    Seriously, though...yes, there's a risk when using a pressure canner, especially if you're the type to take short cuts, or not follow the directions. But the risk is more one of possible injury, where the botulism one is that of death for you and/or your family.

    As someone said...everything must be sterile...and this is the only way to ensure that the FOOD is sterile! It only takes one single botulism spore to survive hot water bath canning to contaminate the jar. Just one microscopic spore.

    I'd rather risk injury to myself, than death for a family member. That's my choice. Everyone has to make their own choice.

    Meg
     
  14. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    I can ground deer in half pints. (I'm single... one person serving)

    it makes the process so easy I now grind the whole deer into ground meat all but a few small cuts for roasting.

    pressure canners, an absolute. and heat the contents up (boil it or bake it) after opening it again just to be safe. (dont op open a jar and eat it just cuz you pressure canned it.)

    chop the bones up and pack the cooker. remove the bleached white bones and cann the slop.
    good slop for stew fixins.
     
  15. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    Going on 3 and a 1/2 years without a refridgerator. I can meat pretty often.
    Our favorite is bacon.
    If I have a lot to do I raw pack, if I have time I brown it up 1st.
    I pressure can everything. Follow the instructions from the manufacturer.
     
  16. Sparkey

    Sparkey Well-Known Member

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  17. Thumper, you can bacon? Tell us just how you do that and how you use it? I've never heard of anyone canning bacon.
     
  18. Jan in CO

    Jan in CO Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've canned several types of meat--all with the pressure canner, by the way, and it sure is handy for quick meals. The only thing I didn't like was when I tried canning chunks of ham, raw packed and then filling the jars with boiling water. They ended up a sick grey color and looked like a lab experiment! However, if you can thinly sliced ham, with no additional liquid, in wide mouth jars, you can have sliced meat for sandwiches or whatever. I have to admit, I did heat the opened jars in the microwave, then let the meat cool before using, tho.

    My mother used to can venison in chunks, browned first in a skillet, then filled the jar with broth or water and processed them. That was the only way my father would ever eat it. Sure couldn't tell it was deer and not beef!

    You can also use whole, unboned chicken parts, with or without broth, or rabbit, although we didn't like the bone-in rabbit as well. They must have a million tiny bones, and no matter how hard I tried, my granddaughter would always find one in her plate of food!

    Canned sausage patties, too, but without any fat or broth. They do shrink up quite a bit, but a good way to preserve it without using all your freezer space. I browned mine first.

    Jan in Co
     
  19. wildwestwoman

    wildwestwoman Well-Known Member

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    I'm new to canning and a little confused. If you can meat. Do you have to use a liquid or is it optional?

    Thanks...I'm really looking forward to using my canner.

    Suzi
     
  20. comfortablynumb

    comfortablynumb Well-Known Member

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    I know red meat... liquid is an option, not really needed. when you raw pack the meat, during pressure canning the meat makes a lot of liquid.
    of course, of you pre cook your meat, you should top up the jar with broth, as cooked meat wont make any liquid... youve cooked it out already.

    I havent done other meats as yet. my granny did whole chickens in half gallon jars.
    she had a pressure rig you could cook a whole pig in "almost", it was massive.