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I am sorry for the typo, countryfied.

Oh dont worry about it....when I first set up my name I wanted it to be countryfried....but I had misspelled it...:rolleyes:

Sorry for my anwering be so short...DH was calling to me from the kitchen...

Anyways meat is low acid the reason for the pressure canning and not water bath. I was a little intimidate by it at first...but it is super easy after you get your feet wet. I love canning meat and have it ready when I need it and dont want to cook.
 

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You need a pressure canner, It is pretty easy once you get started. You can cook the meat first or raw pack it. I raw pack my chicken breasts, large pieces of pork,venison or beef. I cook my rabbit first then debone and pack in own juices. I like browning my ground beef with onions and garlic, rinsing and packing with beef broth. The one thing you want to make sure is that there isn't hardly any fat when you can.

Good luck
 
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You need a pressure canner, It is pretty easy once you get started. You can cook the meat first or raw pack it. I raw pack my chicken breasts, large pieces of pork,venison or beef. I cook my rabbit first then debone and pack in own juices. I like browning my ground beef with onions and garlic, rinsing and packing with beef broth. The one thing you want to make sure is that there isn't hardly any fat when you can.

Good luck
I disagree with with making sure that the meat has hardly any fat..my first time pressure canning was canning (raw 80/20) meatloaf..I canned over 30-quarts..not one seal failed..that was over 2-yrs ago.;)
 

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My grandma and my aunt always canned meat by boiling water bath. I just called my aunt and asked how she did it, she said that you boil quarts for 3 hours. The only thing with boiling water bathing meat is that you need to boil the contents of the jar for 20 min before you consume it.
 
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My grandma and my aunt always canned meat by boiling water bath. I just called my aunt and asked how she did it, she said that you boil quarts for 3 hours. The only thing with boiling water bathing meat is that you need to boil the contents of the jar for 20 min before you consume it.
That's so interesting..Thank you!
 

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My grandma and my aunt always canned meat by boiling water bath. I just called my aunt and asked how she did it, she said that you boil quarts for 3 hours. The only thing with boiling water bathing meat is that you need to boil the contents of the jar for 20 min before you consume it.
xxxx Water bath canning meats is NOT safe. The botulism bacteria can grow after water bath canning and the only safe thing about it is that the toxin itself is distroyed by boiling. You might be safe if you ALWAYS remember to heat the contents, but if somebody that doesn't know picks up one of your jars they could be killed.
 

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Definitely want to use a pressure canner. Just because it used to be done a certain way & some people still do it that way, doesn't mean it is a safe way. Killing my family with botulism just isn't something I want to take a chance on. Quarts in a pressure canner take take 90 minutes.
 

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I'm going to slightly disagree here. The truth is there are no independent studies. It's simply citations of published papers/opinions. One from 35 years ago; one other from 18 yrs ago.

That's the real problem with home canning; thus all the controversy. No true scientific studies even exist. It's all taken from theory of scientific bacteria/spores/etc. The USDA simply draws their own conclusions based on theory and opinions.

The USDA has us all believing if we don't do it their way, we're all going to die, or you're putting your family as high risk for death. That's simply not true. If you take into consideration all the home canners and so many different forms of canning (including thousands - if not millions, of people who don't follow USDA canning procedures) here's an interesting, scientific, and accurate accounting from the CDC that I posted a couple of years ago regarding death and illness from home canned foods (food related deaths, are under law, required to be reported to the CDC by the attending physicians/hospital/medical facility):
Only 1 person died in 8 years of reporting home canning deaths and illnesses:

2009 - 3 illness (all were cases involving mushrooms)
2008 - 14 ilness all from the same 4 cases (family members) of home canned green bean/carrot mix - one death.
2007 - none
2006 - 2 illnesses (1 from canned mushrooms; 1 from canned meat)
2005 - none
2004 - none
2003 - none
2002 - none
2001 - none

Since 2009, the CDC reports there are less than 2 botulism cases a year with no resulting deaths.

If you take into consideration the types of food that were the problems, it brings up the question of whether the food canned was either contaminated, or spoiled prior to canning; or (in the case of the mushrooms) poision/inedible variety of mushrooms. Also, it is also possible that improper sanitation/cleanliness could have been a factor.

I'm not saying that we should all just have a free-for-all in how we home can our foods, but it is apparent that something isn't right in what we are told by the USDA (ie: Ball Bluebook follows only USDA guidelines as does every other published canning books due to lawsuits). But if you ever saw how they home can in other countries and survive (or how we canned in this country before pressure cookers, time tables, etc.) everyone would be dead from home canned food if we took what the USDA says as gospel.

I don't think it's any form of conspiracy or anything like that, rather that the USDA/FDA simply doesn't do any studies nor do they conduct their own testing and evaluations, nor do they check to see if the opinions are based on any studies because home canning is not a priority with that Federal department. They have much more pressing issues and - mostly because funding is so limited in the area of home preserving. All the money allocated to home canning procedure mostly goes to try to keep local and state extension services afloat. It's just easier and sounds best to follow strict un-verified requirements of theory.

So my personal thoughts are, each to his own. No one intentionally sets out to put their family in danger. Each of us has to determine what does or does not put them in danger. We're each going to draw the line at different places. Just as a Germaphobic would draw a different line than the rest of us might; or another might let their kids run barefoot in the chicken coop. Just different ends of the same spectrum; but both just as concerned for their family.

If it makes someone feel better and safer to follow the guidelines to the measure, then I can totally understand and respect that. On the other hand, if another wishes to do it totally differently and not follow all the guidelines, I also think we need to respect that choice, after all, it is their freedom to do so. At least since there is no proof to the contrary anyway; only opinion. :)
 

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I'm not claiming that at all. But the science they are basing their recommendations are only theory with absolutely no testing nor documentation.

Scientific theory is not fact nor is it truth. Theories are unproven educated guesses only. Theories are found to be inaccurate or totally bogus all the time. Because a theory exists and is logical, doesn't mean it is accurate -- but especially does not mean it is any better than any other alternative method.

Based on the "facts" (the proven truth) from the CDC's own documentation of canning illnesses (which doctors and hospitals are required under law to report), the numbers show that the stories we hear and what the FDA/USDA tell us about people dying or becoming seriously sick from home canned foods shows the "theory" to be wrong and those stories not to be true.

For me, I just feel better pressure canning all low acid foods. It doesn't take any more effort IMHO than water bath, but I do understand and respect other's choices without making them feel they don't care about the well being of their families; and will stand up for alternative methods since it's all a bunch of nonesense anyway that we've been fed by governmental agencies trying to cover their backsides from lawsuites, bad press, etc. To say nothing of the public in general making up or passing on untrue canning stories. Like I said, it's each to his own and their freedom to choose for whatever reasons they feel safer.

On a more practical note, look at it this way, if water bath was so dangerous, how in the word are any of us here? It's only been in the last 60 years that pressure canning for the home even existed. If water bath is so dangerous, how has not entire generations been wiped out.
 
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But the science they are basing their recommendations are only theory with absolutely no testing nor documentation.

Ok well from reading the USDA canning website's list of studies they've conducted since 2000 it sure looks like they've been testing their theories. They list:

Conducting microbial challenge studies of some historical processes to validate their safety in light of newer food safety knowledge. Which is the subject being discussed in this thread.

Conducting applied laboratory research on a partially-fermented, refrigerator-stored dill pickle procedure to describe any potential heating treatments for Listeria risk.

Conducting applied laboratory research on a home-canned tomato-based salsa procedure.

Conducting applied laboratory research to compare several home canning lid systems on features of sealing rates and vacuums obtained.

Those sure look like testing to me.
 

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I see your point Karen, but still think it wise to pressure can certain things. There are lots of people that still like to do things the old way & that's fine. I would rather run my pressure canner 90 minutes than heat up the house running a hot water bath for 3 hours.
Bringing things up to that higher temperature makes sense. You can boil something for 5 days & it will never get more than the boiling point in temperature. Pressure canning brings it up to that higher temperature. I personally do not know anyone that has ever gotten sick from botulism. However, I will follow the guidelines given so the risk is minimal. To each their own. I have a BIL that does not pressure can for the amount of time suggested. I will not eat their home canned meat items.
 

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interesting discussion, what has bothered me is botulism is killed at 240 degrees or 10 pounds pressure at sea level, but they don't tell you to increase pressure till over 1000 feet, at 750 feet the boiling temperature of water has already dropped almost 2 degrees so in theory your at about 238.5 degrees, less than what they claim kills botulism spores. I first thought that maybe 240 was just a round number for botulism, but I can't find any place that says it is actually less. So does it really kill the spores, professional "tin" canners heat till its 250 degrees. The toxin that harms us is destroyed at 185 degrees. Thats why they say to boil water bathed (low acid) goods before eating. Lots of theory but what's the facts?

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/boiling-points-water-altitude-d_1344.html

http://www.simplycanning.com/altitude-adjustments.html
 

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It sounds like there really isn't a true answer, it is just about what you feel comfortable with.
I didn't inherit my canning..I taught myself and I choose to be more conservative with what I am willing to do. I don't even like to deviate from the recipes.
I follow the guidelines because I wouldn't know how to NOT follow the guidelines, BUT I know a lot of people who water bath low acid foods like venison and green beans or don't follow procedures like canning pumpkin puree instead of chunks or reusing lids.
I would just recommend that everyone be careful about giving their food out to other people if they have not "followed the directions" because that person might not know what to do to keep the food safe (like boiling it before using).
 
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