Can you identify this breed?

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by jacobs, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. jacobs

    jacobs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    122
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2005
    This ram is 8 months old, approximately 150lbs, is active, and is docile. No horns but you can see where they should be because he has worn off the skin where the horns would be if he had horns. I seem to get one ram a year that looks like him and has the same size and build but not from the same ewe. I'm hoping someone can identify the breed (obviously a throw back recessive gene) from these pix, and he is mixed somewhere down the line. The last one like him was bigger than the ewe at 3 months and was black. Sorry the pix weren't better but the snow was pretty bright. He is actually white but is dirty.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

    Messages:
    8,280
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    Now in Virginia
    Polypay or white suffolk in there somewhere.....maybe? He is a hard one to tell what possible crosses might be in his breeding.
    Would look at the breeds with the ears out of the sides of their head. Head clean of wool, no horns....

    Have seen quite a few Suffolk/Jacob crosses that look like he does.
     

  3. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,108
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2004
    Location:
    Washington State
    Perhaps Dorset? They come both polled and horned...my polled, especially the young ram, have those funny little 'I should have horns' indentations.

    Here's a pic of a couple dorset babies:
    [​IMG]

    edited to add: Here's a helpful breeders link that you may find pics in to help you identify. http://www.nebraskasheep.com/directory/Breeds/
     
  4. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

    Messages:
    8,280
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    Now in Virginia
    Here is a Polypay, ...ears look alike.

    [​IMG]

    White Suffolk

    [​IMG]
     
  5. jacobs

    jacobs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    122
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2005
    I'll have to check back with the Farm. They have a smaller horned ram, possibly a Dorset, but I'll have to check to be sure. I started with 4 ewes and 1 ram from them. One ewe was a jacobs/barbados X, but I thought the others were straight jacobs. Unless, of course, the ram was crossed! That ram was "retired" 6 years ago and he wasn't nearly as big as these new rams are getting.
    Checked out the nebraska sheep site. He looks a little like the first sheep in the logo at the top of the page! He also looks like the Polypay and the Dorset.
     
  6. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    13,084
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Ontario
    My polypay look more like these ones on the OK state page Polypay Note the wolly forehead. My Dorsets don't look that different either.
     
  7. StoneFence

    StoneFence Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2005
    Location:
    NY
    Finn/Dorset maybe. It's a common cross for commercial producers.
     
  8. Shazza

    Shazza Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,538
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Location:
    Victoria Australia
    Jacobs...has he still got his tail?
     
  9. jacobs

    jacobs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    122
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2005
    Yes, he still has his tail. I haven't docked for the last 4 years. I've never had a problem with fly strike yet nor any other problems. I realize docking has benefits but it's not natural!
     
  10. Shazza

    Shazza Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,538
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Location:
    Victoria Australia
    We could not do that here in Australia....as soon as the weather turns steamy the flies come from everywhere. Where do you live Jacobs? Your lucky, if we didn't have to dock their tails we wouldn't...but it's a neccessity here.
     
  11. jacobs

    jacobs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    122
    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2005
    I live in northern Wisconsin, US. I doesn't get real "steamy" here. We have 12 horses, 40 sheep, 200 chickens, guinea fowl, muscovy ducks, and turkeys. We use fly control mineral blocks in the summer and that seems to control the fly population, and what flies are left over, the the muscovys and chickens get. The muscovys take care of the wasp and bee population too. The guineas and turkeys keep the mice population in check.
     
  12. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

    Messages:
    8,280
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    Location:
    Now in Virginia
    Jacob's how about.....

    [​IMG]