Can you eat a sick rabbit?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by claytonpiano, Aug 8, 2005.

  1. claytonpiano

    claytonpiano Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We've got a doe that has had a cold or something ever since we got her. She is isolated from the others. I'm thinking it is snuffles. We were going to kill her and eat her, but our daughter was really concerned that we were going to get sick ourselves. I hate to see this rabbit go to waste, but maybe that is what we should do.

    We are new to rabbits so just don't know.
     
  2. dunroven

    dunroven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I don't know for certain, as I'm pretty new to rabbits also, but if I suspect a rabbit is sick, I won't let my family take that chance. I just feel like whatever is in that rabbit will be passed on to the family and it just isn't worth it. Just my 2 cents worth. Others will probably be along shortly with more info.

    Valorie
     

  3. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It would be stupid to eat a sick animal. You might end up ill and dying . and for what a few bucks worth of meat..
     
  4. travis91

    travis91 Formerly 4animals.

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    would you eat a cow with mad cow or road kill for that matter???
     
  5. JayinCT

    JayinCT Well-Known Member

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    I thought we were a family here. I thought we were here to help eachother, not to take shots at someone for asking a question that we may feel is foolish.

    Before everyone starts on a rampage here, stop and think for a second. Does anyone know where the meat comes from that they buy in the store? Has anyone checked to see what the guidelines are for animals being processed and put in our meat cases in the supermarket? I'm thinking if they had, they would be surprised, and this wouldn't sound like a question that deserved this type of responses.

    To give my opinion, I wouldn't eat it if I had a choice. I doubt that snuffles would be passed on if the rabbit was cooked well and consumed, but like I said, if I had a choice, I wouldn't eat it. That's not to say if times were tough, and I was struggling to feed my family, that it wouldn't make it's way to the dinner table.

    Jay
     
  6. Ltl Ole Me

    Ltl Ole Me Active Member

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    I agree with you Jay, we are all in here to help each other out or at least give an encouraging word.

    We all have things to learn, we all started somewhere. Not one of us was born knowing everything about rabbits. Most of us are probably in here to see what else we can learn. As I am posting this, there was 105 peoples interest that was peaked in some way or another by the subject line for them to come in and view what the replies were. That has to say something in itself.

    claytonpiano, I would think if it was cooked right it would be safe to eat. I know of a processor that allows 25% of the rabbits a grower sells to have coccidiosis before the grower is notified that they have a problem. And I don't know how many of you have seen a liver with coccidiosis, but it is nasty looking. The processor does not sell the livers, but they do sell the meat. Not all rabbits processed, sold, and consumed are 100% healthy.

    I also work for a turkey company that grows and processes. The turkeys that are processed and sold are not always 100% healthy. I don't think the question was out of line at all.


    I got this information from the following web site: http://www.ask-the-vet.com/rabbit-diseases.htm

    Rabbit diseases - respiratory problems
    Snuffles - caused by a bacteria called Pasteurella. It can result in a more chronic respiratory condition with pneumonia and other abscesses, but by and large, most rabbits get snuffly cold like symptoms and a yellow nasal discharge. Affected rabbits invariably sneeze and cough.

    Rabbit diseases - musculoskeletal problems
    Wryneck - this is when your rabbit develops a head tilt. Usually as a result of a middle ear infection caused by Pasteurella.

    How many of you in here would eat a rabbit with wry neck. I know I have, as I believe many others have too.
     
  7. claytonpiano

    claytonpiano Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks so much everyone. I've enjoyed reading all the responses. I actually thought the "mad cow" comment was really funny. What great thoughts, however. We've decided to kill her and bury her tomorrow. My crazy husband thought we should send everyone invitations to the funeral service. I'm thinking we'll just shoot her and bury her so that I can get her out of sight before all the little piano students show up tomorrow!!!! Something about killing cute rabbits seems to send the six year olds into a tail spin and I really need to income from the students!!
     
  8. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

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    LOL, that reminds me of the time I butchered a rabbit when some neighbor girls were over. (first mistake) They were all outside and the processing was going on inside, but then a younger sibling came in, and then ran back outside to get everyone! It was bad enough butchering it, but the poor little girls were horrified and now think I'm an evil bunny slayer! Oh well, now we butcher rabbits when no one else is around.
     
  9. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    I would only advise you to eat the animal IF you know for a fact what it was sick from.

    There are certain ailments that still leave animals edible and fit for human consumption.

    If it is tested, and is found to be something that isn't passable through eating, or harmful to humans, then enjoy...but you can always use the addage attributed to other food - when in doubt, throw it out.