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My young "Reliance" peach was the only peach I had that set fruit this year, but I think that last winters cold froze the blossoms on the other peach trees because the flower buds did not open on my other two trees.. Still, we did get a late frost and that young tree still managed to set a fruit. I ended up removing the fruit because I decided that the tree was not old enough and I did not want the tree set back

I realize that is thin evidence, but I am hopeful that the Reliance peach will bear in spite of our late frosts.. One year of peaches out of every 3 is not nearly often enough for me
 

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OK, Can we do it this way, OF the peaches commonly sold in stores, which has the latest time of blossoming? Im trying to find those peaches so as to plant the pits. I saw on U tubes how to do this, and they said peaches and apricots are the only fruit that will plant back exactly like the tree it came off of. I see no reason to do this with peaches that have early blosseming times.
 

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Takes 3-4 years from planting a pit until harvest....you going to wait that long, FBB?
 

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Loring Peach - Peach Trees - Stark Bro’s (starkbros.com)

Bill. if you can find a Loring peach, it might be the one for you. It comes on after the Red Haven (all of them, Hale Haven incuded) and stays until the middle of September. It has a mild skin, is bright yellow, with red splotching near the pit. The flesh sometimes sticks to the pit, but the size allows you to sarifice some while peeling and separating the pit .But, I don't know if this variety will germinate from seed(some don't, as you may already know from the You Tube you watched.

Grocery store peaches: my experience is that they are picked green and you have to try to ripen them at home in a paper bag. And in the early part of the season, they are shipped in from states farther south. So, even if an immature seed will germinate later on, it may not be very suitable for your climate. And then there's the whole issue of rootstocks. If you manage to grow one from seed, the rootstock you get is what you get. As you know, most peaches are grafted onto special rootstocks.

And, oh yes, peaches are mostly true to seed, but not 100% . There might be a few throwbacks in a bushel.....

So, for the reasons above, my opinion is that unless I were patient and wanted to spend my spare time trying it, I would stick to the tried and true......Save my money and find an orchard....And plunk down my $35 and just buy a bushel to take home.

geo
 
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