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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I asked this question in the cleaning forum but didn't get an answer. Hopefully someone can give me a recommendation.

Last Christmas my aunt gave me an Amish quilt that she bought about 30 years ago. We've had it on the bed all year. I'd like to wash it right before we leave for our Christmas trip and hang it to dry. I have an old washing machine and do not have a gentle cycle. Do you think I can wash this quilt in my machine without damaging it?
 

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Is it hand-sewn? You might want to take it to the cleaners if it is.

However if it was made by the Amish and intended for daily use, I would wash it. My Amish friends wash their quilts in a wringer washer and use them daily, they seem no worse for the wear. Of course they use really heavy fabrics for their own quilts, it wears like iron!
 

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I'd play it safe and hand-wash it in the bathtub with oxyclean or a fairly strong detergent. Let it soak for an hour, rinse throughly, and then wring it by hand.
 

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www.HarperHillFarm.com
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I've only washed quilts in the summertime when I can dry it outside. I hand wash it in the laundry tub using Dreft and lukewarm water. SEVERAL rinsings and then lay it flat to dry on a clean sheet that I've laid on the lawn. What ever you decide to do, DON'T put it in the dryer.
 

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I'd play it safe and hand-wash it in the bathtub with oxyclean or a fairly strong detergent. Let it soak for an hour, rinse throughly, and then wring it by hand.
Ditto. I bought an Amish quilt, and I've washed it in the machine- no worse for it.
 

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washing it in the machine would probably be fine. But it shouldn't be hung to dry if at all possible. The weight of the wet quilt can stretch and distort it dramatically. If you don't want to machine dry it (I machine dry all the quilts I make, large or small) then it should be laid flat to dry.

If you machine wash it, it couldn't hurt to throw in a couple of Shout Color Catchers so any of the dark colors don't bleed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It looks like this quilt was machine pieced and hand quilted. Sounds like the consensus is to hand wash it. I'll have to wait till spring to do that then I can lay it across the clotheslines.
 

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plains of Colorado
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Mine are too big for our machine so I usually take it to laundry mat and put it in a front loader. In summer I hang it to dry but in winter I might put it in the dryer on low heat for 10 min. then hang out.
 

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Wasza polska matka
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Amish quilts START at $500. For a thirty year old one, it might be worth more. I wouldnt do it myself, maybe hand wash in the tub with woolite
 

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Nope, dont wash that quilt, a much better solution would be to send it to me, and buy yerself a new one fer Christmas, that way I get a nice quilt, you get a nice quilt and we are both happy. :D


Seriously, the amish use good stuff normally, and a regular machine washing shouldnt hurt it at all, dry it on a line and yer in shape. If you are really concerned take it to a pro and let them deal with it. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here's a pic of the quilt. The color is a bit off in the photo.

 

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Wasza polska matka
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why dont you just air it out on the line on a sunny day?? I would just spot clean "spots".
 

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I have a quilt that is well over 100yrs old and I washed it two yrs ago, in my washer.. It was so dirty and I couldn't even be in the room with it w/out gagging. I decided it was either wash it or throw it out and decided to take a chance.. It had been boxed up for over 30yrs... It was hand stitched and hand quilted and it turned out beautifully! I hung it on the line to dry for a while and then put it on a folding rack to finish drying.. I went over it and made sure their were no slipped or broken stitches--and found not one bad place...

Most of the older quilts were made to USE.. they did not have the luxury of having things just to look at--my grandmother used to soak her quilts in a tub of really hot water, push them in and out of the water, turning them over and over and spot scrubbing any stains.. then she would rinse in cold water twice, run them thru her wringer and hang to dry. This was done every Sept.
 

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front loading washing machines are your best bet for machine washing a quilt. The laundromat was a good idea. There is also a product to wash quilts, called ORVUS, I bought some on eBay. It REALLY needs to lie flat to dry, not layed across a clothes line. It will damage the quilt to be drapped on anything to dry, it will pull the threads and cut the fabric.
 
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