can I rebatch goat milk soap?

Discussion in 'Soapmaking' started by BamaSuzy, Nov 26, 2007.

  1. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    I have some bits of goat milk soap (made simply with lye, goat milk, and vegetable shortening) as well as some partial bars etc. left over from several times of making batches of soap.

    I was wondering if I could "rebatch" this soap and pour it into molds to make newer bars????

    I try heating a little in the microwave (some shavings in a glass container) but that was NOT a good idea!!!! it bubbled over and looked like it was going to catch on fire!!!!

    So can I melt these pieces to form new bars????

    I've been making goat milk soap about three or four years now! THANKS!
     
  2. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    I just re-batched some soap by putting it in my crock pot on high. It melted nicely with no bubbling over

    Heather
     

  3. oberhaslikid

    oberhaslikid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I grate mine and put in a double boiler and then add 1 Tbs.water to get it started and stir and stir untill melted then add fragrance or what ever.
     
  4. beaglady

    beaglady Well-Known Member

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    A covered roasting pan in a 275 degree oven works pretty well too. I grate my remnants in the food processor, then slip them into the oven. Whether or not I add water depends on how moist the soap is to begin with. The oven method seems to need less babysitting then other ways I've tried.
     
  5. Gailann Schrader

    Gailann Schrader Green Woman

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    Yep. I use milk to melt mine. In the crockpot. Mine tends to turn dark, so I add uber instand coffee dissoled in a little water and add patchouli. I call it "All Night Ugly." It's a big seller.
     
  6. tioga12

    tioga12 Well-Known Member

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    I usually only do a rebatch if a batch seperates and hasn't cured at all, otherwise it seems like it would take too long to melt down. If any moisture is lost, you will need to replace it with some water when reheating. I melt down my rebatches over medium heat in a stock pot (I do 9 pound batches) and keep stirring until entirely melted, then pour quickly into the mold as it will be get flakey and not conform well on top if you take too much time. Rebatched soap tends to feel more "waxy" and is certainly not comparable to regular CP soap. (I make only goat milk soap). However, some customers don't mind one bit if they really like the fragrance! :)
     
  7. donsgal

    donsgal Nohoa Homestead

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    Yes, I prefer the oven method also, mainly because dh will not eat out of anything after I have made soap in it LOL.

    I always add a cup of water or milk and it is often nice to throw in some olive oil, castor oil or other oils in addition to a fragrance and coloring.

    Makes for some very yummy soap! I love rebatching!

    donsgal
     
  8. tioga12

    tioga12 Well-Known Member

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    You DO?!
    I hate having to rebatch! Not that it is hard to do. I think the quality of cold process soap is so much nicer. Does your rebatched soap have that softer waxy feel that mine does? Mine gets hard after a couple of months. Customers don't care or seem to notice a difference. But I hate rebatched soap! :grump: