Can anyone tellme what trees and plant these are and is that a honey bee?

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by carly, Sep 6, 2006.

  1. carly

    carly on winged flight...

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  2. RockyRooster

    RockyRooster Well-Known Member

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    The very first picture looks like milkweed. It looks like a honey bee to me.

    The second picture looks like a hemlock tree.

    The third picture a pine tree.

    4th picture? I have seen them before but I don't know what they are called.
     

  3. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Not milkweed for sure.

    2nd looks like some kind of spruce or hemlock.

    Yes, honey bee.
     
  4. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i was thinking...

    poke weed...it is awful late for blossoms though.

    definately some sort of spruce.

    probably white pine

    no idea.

    yep, you have a sweet honey bee friend.
     
  5. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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  6. tillandsia

    tillandsia Well-Known Member

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    The first one is Polygonum cuspidatum, Japanese knotweed.
    The second looks like Norway spruce.
    Third is some kind of pine.
    Fourth is Lythrum salicaria, purple loosestrife.
     
  7. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    Honeybee definitely. Knotweed
    Second one is definitely Norway Spruce. Hemlocks have very tiny cones.
    Third is pine but not white pine. Either Austrian or red pine. Count the needles in the bundle. White pine has five needles.
    Loosestrife for sure. Invasive and impossible to kill.
     
  8. pasotami

    pasotami Hangin out at the barn!

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    The second sort of looks like the pines outside my house - they were put there from nursery stock and only a few survived - I was told they were Douglas Fir Christmas trees but man are mine huge. The cones are slinder and long then open up once they are dried in the house...
    I've never seen the first photo before but that sure looks like a honey bee to me.... The third is some kind of pine but without a tree view I could not tell you what type. And the last I would like to know, I have a few of those purple flowers here.
     
  9. carly

    carly on winged flight...

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    THANKS to all who answered.

    I am going to look up this knotweed thingy, never heard of it.

    I thought it was a honeybee as opposed to another bee. There were hundreds of bee on this knotwood---it is a huge bush.
     
  10. harrisjnet

    harrisjnet Okie with Attitude

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    The last picture looks like liatris not loosestrife, bloom is simular.
    Yes to honey bee.
    Have seen the others, but can't put a name to them.
     
  11. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    Definitely not Liatris. Flower is totally wrong.
     
  12. JJ Grandits

    JJ Grandits Well-Known Member

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    Pine looks like a scots pine. first picture looks like poke weed.
     
  13. Nancy in Maine

    Nancy in Maine Well-Known Member

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    The knotweed is VERY invasive. We have it growing wild all over town here. My mother has been trying to get rid of hers for years and years. I can only assume that years and years ago it was a popular plant. DON'T PLANT ANY unless you really really like it. You could end up with a forest of the stuff. Really. I have a book that says it's edible and tasty, but I have yet to try it.
     
  14. skruzich

    skruzich Well-Known Member

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    IF the blossums on the first one produce dark purple berries and has a red stalk, we call that pokeweed down here. I have had pokeweed salad several times this summer. MMmm

    That is a honeybee, more specifically a Italian
    The Italian honeybee originates from the continental part of Italy, South of the Alps, and North of Sicily. The subspecies may have survived the last ice age in Italy. It is genetically a different subspecies than the subspecies from the Iberian peninsula and from Sicily. It is the most widely distributed of all honeybees, and has proved adaptable to most climates from subtropical to cool temperate, but it is less satisfactory in humid tropical regions.

    Italian bees, having been conditioned to the warmer climate of the central Mediterranean, are less able to cope with the "hard" winters and cool, wet springs of more northern latitudes. They do not form such tight winter clusters. More food has to be consumed to compensate for the greater heat loss from the loose cluster. The tendency to raise brood late in autumn also increases food consumption.

    * Color: Abdomen has brown and yellow bands. Among different strains of Italian bees there are three different colors: Leather; bright yellow (golden); and very pale yellow (Cordovan).
    * Size: The bodies are smaller and their overhairs shorter than those of the darker honeybee races
    * Tongue length: 6.3 to 6.6 mm
    * Mean Cubital index: 2.2 to 2.5


    They are quite docile, and takes a lot to aggrevate them into attacking. I commonly amuse folks with them by putting honey on my fingers and sticking them next to the entrance of the hive and let them cover my fingers hehe. freaks people out.