can anyone tell me about obers?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Galloping Goats, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. Galloping Goats

    Galloping Goats Active Member

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    I'd like to know more about obers. Does anyone out there have any that can tell me what their personalities are like? I've only seen a couple in person and I really like the way they look. So, there must be a draw back, like how Nubians are vocal. On average, how much milk do they give? Are they hardy? Easy kiddings? That type of thing.
     
  2. geminigoats

    geminigoats Well-Known Member

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    I LOVE my Oberhaslis, they are so sweet and gentle compared to my mean ole' Alpines. What I am saying here about Obers is based upon my experiences thus far with them, about a year.

    They milk just as well or more than some of my Alpines. About a gal and a half a day. I got my Obers a yr ago, 4 of them, 2 grades and 2 registered. With the milk production they were bred for show and milk production and so it may be different with other bloodlines in the breed. But from what I have read on different bloodlines their production is fairly good. I also like the fact they have more BF or butterfat too.

    As for hardy, you bet they are! While my Alpines are mouning for their fancy alfalfa hay, etc. they are out in the pasture eating. Thats when I noticed the difference in the breeds was when they seemed to acclimate much better to the tough climate for goats here in AR. They don't seem to stress as much either compared to my Alpines which needed a yr to adjust, they just kept on milking, etc without missing a beat, got bred after I got them (a 1,000 mile journey), about a month after. Kidded in Dec and never sucked in or lost milk production. Their coats are always shinny and slick and they seem hardier to me.

    As for easy kiddings, mine so far have kidded OK without problems, however, my friend who has raised them for years says that sometimes they need help with kiddings and need to be pulled if the kids are too big. I don't really know of any other Ober breeders so I don't know if its because of breeding to a bigger buck, etc or if it is a breed problem for them. I do know that the head on the Ober is slightly wider than on my Alpines.

    The drawbacks are they are smaller than the other breeds.
    Because they are small when it comes to showing it is hard to compete in the final classes for BDIS, etc because size generally wins out. Other drawbacks in the show ring are there are not enough Obers many times to make a class.

    Hope this helps.

    Bernice
     

  3. GoatTalkr9

    GoatTalkr9 Well-Known Member

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    My husband first got us into Oberhasli's. He saw them at a fair and liked them. So I bought one,a friend bought one..and now we have an Obi buck, lil wether,2 does,and 2 doelings. In about a month I'll be getting a bred doe from Ohio with yet another Obi line to add to my herd. :) They seem more "ladylike" than my other does,and kidded the easiest. I'm breeding some of them soon and will be overrun with Obies around March if anyone is near me and interested. :p They are a wonderful breed,and very distinctive in coloring. We bring ours to a pasture beside our house during hunting season..they look too much like deer in an open field!
     
  4. mimsmommy

    mimsmommy Active Member

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    Hey Goattalk9, where do you live? We are planning to be on our new place (at this point imaginary new place) in the first of the year and will be looking for a few family milk goats. We will be in SE Mo. PM me if you are within driving distance and i will send you my email to contact me later. thanks! mimsmommy
     
  5. GoatTalkr9

    GoatTalkr9 Well-Known Member

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    Lol...I'm in West Virginia. It would be a looong country drive. :)
     
  6. DWFarms

    DWFarms Member

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    What Obis I have been around was sweet goats.
     
  7. oberhaslikid

    oberhaslikid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have had Obers for 5-6 years now.This year I wanted something different.Every year the babies look the same untill you get to know them, they all look alike.I have one Doe that I wouldnt take anything for she is unreal at times.She also milks 2 gallon plus a day .They are laid back ,of medium size. I traded a buckling for a Nubian Doeling this year and she is so noisy the Obers try to push her out of the barn, she screams and echos in the barn at feeding time.I also bought a Lamacha this year and she is the sweetest thing but at the bottom of the Totem pole so to speak.The largest goat I have, she is like a Giraffe.But the Obers know they were there first.I still like my Oberhaslis.I thought I might go to some thing else, but those babies are the cutest things and it makes it all worth it.Can you tell spring is my favorite time of the year.I Have always been there for the kiddings except once and Ive been in panic 2 times.The first was too young (8 months)WONT do that again.The other was a hang up in a 4 year old doe that had 2 big boys.My buck throws large kids.He was a 12lb er.The milk doesnt have very much cream,That is another reason why I wanted to see the difference in the other breeds.My mom had Nubians and Alpines and I dont remember any difference.
     
  8. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I got to help show LuAnn Tuttle's Obers this year at Boise -- she is in Utah, and has some *goregous* animals.

    Tveter's are in Quincy, Washington, and they have some really nice stock too.

    Tracy
     
  9. Galloping Goats

    Galloping Goats Active Member

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    no one has anything negative to say. Does that mean they are the perfect breed of goat? :D Thanks for all of your replies. I better wait until after my barn is finished my to tell my husband I want another goat. I have Nubians and yes, they do talk a lot but you never know what the babies are going to look like and there is just something about the way they run through the field with their ears flopping in the wind the endears them to my heart. :)
     
  10. mysticokra

    mysticokra Well-Known Member

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    We have idiot deer hunters that prowl the area. I would like an Obi, but the pictures I have seen look so much like deer that I am afraid they would get shot.

    Do they come in white?
     
  11. geminigoats

    geminigoats Well-Known Member

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    Thats why we always every year pen up closer to the barn the goaties, because we have many Alpines that are Chamoisee and look like deer, especially Black Jack, one of my bucks. In white? Hmmmm......if they looked like a Sanaan in white I'd be so confused, don't know how those Sanaan breeders keep them all straight. I remember once a lady in VA who breeds Sanaans had me help her show her does, she brought 60+ to the fair every year, and I was stumped as to how she knew them apart!

    Bernice
     
  12. nappy

    nappy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, those Obies are really sharp but I only have Alpine goats. But one of mine looks more like a Toggenburg (a breed that I think looks the most like a deer). We also keep our herd close to the barn during hunting season since other people have had their livestock shot by those "blind" hunters. My hubby said (after I've been reading all these postings to him) that we should put orange vests on the goats!! Some of my chamoisee French Alpines (reddish brown body and black face, ears, legs, tail, belly and down the back) look very much like the Oberhasli in coloration and markings so for now I can only imagine owning an Obie. I'll just dream for now. I don't think all Alpines are mean but some of mine think they're in charge by butting each other around. And one is very vocal.

    Nappy
     
  13. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    I've had Obers and love them. I got them because I was living in the middle of Everett, WA, and needed quiet goats. I asked around, and the quietest were the Obers, so that's what I got. As an added bonus, I really like their look. Mine were not only beautiful and quiet, but gentle with my Nigerians, very sweet and docile to handle, and lovely on the milkstand. Just an incredibly mellow personality, and very people-oriented.

    Now for the cons. I understand it's hard to get really nice udders on Oberhasli, especially foreudder attachment. The one perfect foreudder I had was destroyed by boer-cross kids. :mad: A lot of Obers don't have the capacity or production of, say, Alpines or Toggenburgs. I personally did not experience this problem. My third-freshener was giving 12 pounds in a long, level lactation, and first-fresheners were right around 8 pounds a day at peak.

    The biggest problems for me were these. First, I like really rich milk. My Obers were probably giving low- to mid-three percent butterfat. Not enough. Second, I was getting WAY more milk than I could use. I sold some, which paid for their feed, but it was a hassle, and I was still getting too much milk.

    After mulling it over for a couple of years, I decided to try Mini-Oberhasli, hoping for more butterfat and less milk, accompanied by smaller size and smaller feed bills. My first kids hit the ground last spring (you can see them on my website), and I'll be freshening my first Mini-Ober doeling next spring. She is as sweet and mellow as her dam. I can't wait to see what her udder is like!
     
  14. Manchamom

    Manchamom trail ahead-goats behind

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    Something else to think about, Obers are the most sought after pack goat breed. Gives you something to do with some of your buck kids. The reason they are such good pack goats is because you don't have to teach them to cross rivers, they love water! Jill