Can a Hawk get new Kids?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by MillsFarmFamily, Dec 19, 2005.

  1. MillsFarmFamily

    MillsFarmFamily Well-Known Member

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    We have a HUGE hawk that has now killed 2 of our chickens. One was missing and now we came home and found him eating a second one. I hate to kill him, but I don't want him to get our new kids. Do you think that is possible?
     
  2. Kasidy

    Kasidy Well-Known Member

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    We have a pair of owls and a pair of red tailed hawks that nest in our windbreak. Never had any of them try to kill a lamb or kid. Usually in Jan or Feb --before we start lambing/kidding-- we have a bald eagle hang out in the trees for a few weeks. It is always gone before March otherwise I would worry a lot. But in over twenty years of living here and raising lambs we have never had a loss from hawks (or any other wild predator).
     

  3. Croenan

    Croenan Well-Known Member

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    I had a full grown chicken also taken by a hawk and I now have a small puppy that I watch when he is outside because I thoroughly believe that if they are hungary enough they would eat him. I think that it is possible for them to get a small baby...but once they are about 2 weeks old, I think they should be ok, unless they are really tiny. They are very jumpy and alert so I think they would sense him coming. Just my 2 cents.
     
  4. Ramblin Acres

    Ramblin Acres Well-Known Member

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    Hawks will get real small animals(chickens,kittens and ect)But I don't know if you can legally kill a hawk?I would imagine it varries from state to state.I would check with your DNR.
    You could always put netting over your chicken yard and that will stop the hawks from getting your chickens.

    I have never herd of hawks killing baby goats before,but I guess there is always a chance for a first time.
     
  5. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    I dont know about hawks... but my neighbor has 600 Boer goats, and he says that he loses up to 100 kids every year to raccoons and wild pigs. :eek:

    He has SO much land, and a section of it is 20 miles away, so he cant keep a close eye on his goats. SO SAD to lose all those babies! He thinks a LGD wouldnt work, but I say it's worth a try!
     
  6. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    I wouldn't think so, as long as they are with their mother I would think that she, if not them, would sense the hawk before it attacked and that she would protect them, and there is NO way that any hawk would EVER try to take on a mama goat trying to protect her babies. Good Luck with your little ones, bye.
     
  7. Sweet Goats

    Sweet Goats Cashmere goats

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    I have lose several full grown cats to hawks. I saw the darn thing come down and take my mom cat that was REAL pregnant. I think they are beautiful if they are not near my place.
     
  8. witchysharon

    witchysharon Well-Known Member

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    Kids of smaller breeds like Nigerians and Pygmy's can, and have, been taken by large hawks/owls/eagles. I don't think they could manage to carry off a larger/standard breed kid unless it was really on the small side.
     
  9. Rosarybeads

    Rosarybeads Well-Known Member

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    Actually, I was wondering the same thing about the laws because we lost about half of our free range chickens and ducks, and a few cats from a pair of hawks. You definitely need to do your research, because it's a FEDERAL offense to kill any bird of prey (also songbirds). That means the whole kiboodle, hawk, eagle, falcon, and all! I think it's ridiculous unless they are endangered or are rare, but I chose to not risk a federal offense, thank you very much!! :) :)
     
  10. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    I've heard of eagles taking small lambs, but I've never heard of a hawk bothering kids. It actually is illegal to kill a raptor. Although after loosing 2 laying hens to a bald eagle I admit I'm tempted...
     
  11. Ramblin Acres

    Ramblin Acres Well-Known Member

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    As a breeder of Pygmies we have never lost a kid to a hawk.We have several hawks that fly over everyday plus we have a small section of woods on our property that I have seen the hawks perching in.I guess anything could happen,there is always that possibility.

    If your having problems with the chickens an easy solution would be to put netting over your chicken yard.Like what they do for pheasants.
     
  12. witchysharon

    witchysharon Well-Known Member

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    I have several friends who are pygmy goat breeders also, and a few have lost a kid to raptors. I have never had it happen, but the larger owls/hawks and eagles can take a cat (the same size as young kids) so I can see how it's very possible.

    One of my friends recounted seeing an eagle (in her case) scoop up one of her kids and 'try' to fly off with it.....but her Pyr was so quick he was out like a flash and literally jumped in the air at the eagle and made it drop the goat! That lucky baby survived with minimal injuries (talon holes).
     
  13. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Your neighbor might want to get a few gelded llamas to run with the goats. They protect goats from preditors, get along well with them and eat the same type of forage as goats do.
     
  14. Lost-Nation

    Lost-Nation Member

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    We've lost countless fowl to owls & hawks - I was out milking the goats one morning & watched a hawk swoop down & snatch up an adult rooster right out of the barnyard - not the mean rooster, of course - the NICE one, LOL. We had less problems when we added geese to the family - my guess is their size might be intimidating to the "raptors" . . . ?

    Since getting LGDs however, they seem to steer clear of the farm, now. Our veteran Pyr, Cody barks at any large birds that are flying over, LOL.

    Timely that someone asked abt birds of prey possibly being a threat to kids/lambs/etc. - a good breeder friend of mine just lost a week-old kid to what they think was an eagle over the weekend. The kid was apparently too big for the bird to take off with - & it must have been interrupted b/c they found the kid barely alive from blood loss due to several puncture wounds. Their kids are started in a former dog kennel made of 8' chain link fencing & wire buried into the ground to keep dogs from digging out - or predators from digging in, which . . . you'd THINK would provide pretty good protection, but . . . not if the predators are coming from above!

    So yep, I'd definitely invest in LGDs if birds of prey were an issue!

    Regards,
    Sarah
     
  15. witchysharon

    witchysharon Well-Known Member

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    I'd definitely invest in LGDs if birds of prey were an issue

    Ditto. LGD's have keen intelligence. Our roosters have different calls for different predators (ground or aerial) and our Anatolian learned on his own the difference. If a rooster gives the "ground predator' call, he patrols the property and perimeter. If a rooster gives the "aerial predator' call, our dog will scan the sky and any trees looking for a raptor.

    One of our pigeons got knocked to the ground by a peregrine falcon which was turning back to 'collect' his meal. My dog went and stood guard over the pigeon, and barked for me until I came and retrieved it. Luckily the pigeon survived the fall with no injuries (although somewhat stunned) since he landed in a foot of snow. That pigeon doesn't go flying very far from the safety of the loft to this day!