Calling all culinary homesteaders! Minimalist recipes needed!

Discussion in 'Online Recipe Book' started by AndyJorgen, Jun 25, 2017.

  1. AndyJorgen

    AndyJorgen Member

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    Good day-

    My garden is undergoing some massive changes in terms of what I'll focus on.

    I want to get away from growing a couple ingredients of a recipe, and move towards growing 80-100% of the ingredients in my garden.

    Example:
    Sweet potato fries
    - 4 medium sweet potato, cut into fries
    - 2 tsp lemon zest
    - 1/3 cup oil
    - 1/3 cup cilantro
    - 1 clove garlic
    - S&P

    I currently grow the entire recipe except S&P in my garden.

    Luckily with Florida's long growing season I can grow multiple phases (spring garden, fall garden, and a short Winter garden)

    Currently I'm growing:
    Sunflour -this is what I press my veg oil from
    Peanut

    Amaranth
    Millet
    Buckwheat
    Chia
    Oats (first time will be this fall)

    Peppers, sweet and hot
    Basil
    Rosemarie
    Cilantro & coriander
    Sweet potato
    Onions
    Multiple citrus varieties
    Beans and peas
    Daikon radish

    Hoping to get either sugar beets or sugar cane going this year for a sweetener.

    Let's also say I can raise my own poultry and eggs.


    If you guys have recipes that can be made entirely, or close to, from what I'm growing, I'd be eternally grateful.

    I'm also not above adding things to the garden, if they can be used in a multitude of dishes.
     
  2. nobrabbit

    nobrabbit Transplanted Tarheel

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    One of my favorite pizzas is a pesto with fresh tomato or roasted tomato on it with a bit of mozzarella. I have not made it myself but I have seen plenty of recipes online for amaranth pizza dough. The basil you could make pesto with and if you grew tomatoes you would have most of the ingredients except the cheese. Or you could make a Margherita pizza with the amaranth dough, basil and tomato sauce (that you make yourself).
     

  3. Sarah H.

    Sarah H. Member

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    Oct 11, 2017

    I know this is a bit off topic but I am curious, how are you pressing your sunflower seeds? The tutorials I have seen show equipment that ranges from $80 to $400. What do you use/recommend?

    Thanks!
     
  4. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Stir fry onions and cabbage: add soy at the last minute.

    Blanch peas while they are still in the pod and those peas will SQUIRT out when you press on them.

    Cherry tomatos, of course.

    That is all I can think of: you are already growing a LOT!
     
  5. CajunSunshine

    CajunSunshine Joie de vivre!

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    Make hummus with beans, which includes a little bit of homemade peanut butter (which is a fine substitute for tahini). Spread the homemade hummus onto tortillas made with flour from buckwheat, millet, etc. Layer fresh vegetables down the middle of the tortilla and roll it up! Yum!


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  6. CajunSunshine

    CajunSunshine Joie de vivre!

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    Baked sweet potato, split open lengthwise and topped with a little bit of your favorite homemade sweetener, plus a few chunks of sweet citrus.


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  7. karenp

    karenp Well-Known Member

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    Consider bees, I think honey is much less work than trying to get sugar from sugar cane or sugar beets.
     
  8. CajunSunshine

    CajunSunshine Joie de vivre!

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    I bought non-GMO sugar beet seeds from Baker Creek: https://www.rareseeds.com/sugar-beet/
    and will try my hand at making homemade sweetener from my harvested beets.

    According to http://www.survivopedia.com/how-to-make-sugar-at-home/

    "...beet sugar is super-easy to make. No special equipment is required and it doesn’t take a long time to do it.
    1. Scrub your beets to get all dirt and debris off of them.
    2. Thinly slice, dice or shred the beets and place them in a pot.
    3. Add just enough water to cover the beets.
    4. Heat to a boil then simmer long enough for the beets to become tender and soft.
    5. Remove from heat and strain the beet pulp out of the juice using cheesecloth.
    6. Return the syrup to the pot.
    7. Hold the cheesecloth full of pulp over the pot and squeeze as much water as possible out.
    8. Simmer until it becomes thick, honey-like syrup, stirring frequently, then remove from heat.
    9. Place in a storage container and allow to cool.
    10. As it cools, the sugar will crystalize. Remove crystals and smash into a powder with your fingers so that it looks like table sugar.
    11. Store and use just like you would regular sugar.

    Just FYI, you can expect to get about 17% of your original beet weight in sugar. To do the math for you, you’ll need about 10 pounds of beets to yield 1.7 pounds of sugar.

    Just FYI, you can expect to get about 17% of your original beet weight in sugar. To do the math for you, you’ll need about 10 pounds of beets to yield 1.7 pounds of sugar."


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  9. CajunSunshine

    CajunSunshine Joie de vivre!

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    Also, I have heard that most people don't bother to wait for crystals to form on the sugar beet syrup. They use it just as it is, a liquid sweetener. This is how I plan to use it, and if some crystals form, I'll use that too!