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Discussion Starter #21
mreynolds, we had a similar situation with my mother in law. Even in the hospital she didn't get the care and attention she needed. This was even with one of her sons with her all the time. She would not have survived the week in the nursing home if he hadn't been there.



You are allowed to have a dumpster fire in downtown Columbus at midnight but not a drink at a bar at 10:01 pm (22:01 for those one military time). So maybe fire kills the virus. I know you can't spread it at a riot or protest.
We have 2 hospitals here. One will allow 1 visitor but only that one. The other wont allow anyone. Guess which one is the stroke center.....The nursing homes/rehabs wont allow anyone. It takes a terrible toll on all parties involved. Especially the ones who are isolated from everyone.

I dont mean to vent but it really irks me. I know full well that some of us here have lost people to Covid on this very forum. But if we never see them again isnt it the same as losing them? They can spend years in the home and from the looks of things this wont end any time soon. My mother will never go into a nursing home if I have my say. My father, who passed away last year, would whooop my butt later on down the line if I let that happen.

And.... I do have a dumpster....can I just light it off instead of the red oak? Maybe that will do the trick.
 

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The rules of curfews have a long history here of not working.
However, making citizens believe they will infect, be infected, and die seems to be now having an effect.
So if it could reduce prostitution, drug dealing, DUI, cat burglars, peeping Toms, date rape, etc, maybe the
Polit bureau is on to something.
Rules carrying the risk of death, with a pinch of shame added. Oh, and endorse the reporting of said crimes by friends neighbors and coworkers
The word for the year 2020 should be "essential", as everything in life now weighed on this scale.
Interesting.
 

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The cretins handing out rules and writing the news articles just don't seem to get it-- if the immunity rate (had the infection, now bug-free) is 5%, then 95 out of every person you meet COULD possibly infect you....If the immunity rate is 95%, then only 5 in every 100 could possibly infect you.

When I'm elected Emperor, given that the death rate among the under 45 crowd is only 1 in 300,000. I will require all people in that group to become infected, thus lowering the risk of infection & death in the older bunch...Ike ordered the invasion of Normandy knowing the casualty rate would be 1 in 4. It was worth it in the long run.
 

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Covid killed my mom.
Mom went in for bladder surgery just be for the restrictions hit. They found some infection and transferred her to a “Better “ hospital . We were not allowed to visit there. Later we found out that the surgeon nicked a blood vessel there.
Mom spent 2 days in icu and recovered enough for a regular room,still no visitation Except by phone but after a short while there She got worse.
After DAYS of no phone someone figured out she was bleeding internally whenher heart stopped
They fixed THAT but it was all to much on a 82 year old woman and she steadily declined and passed.
After over a month of hospitalization she was allowed visitors the last two days of her life.
I’m not saying the staff didn’t do their jobs but they didn’t know here like we did.
I’m sure we would have caught the problem days earlier. Not to mention have been a important morale boost.

NEVER allow a loved one to be alone in a hospital NEVER
 

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Covid killed my mom.
Mom went in for bladder surgery just be for the restrictions hit. They found some infection and transferred her to a “Better “ hospital . We were not allowed to visit there. Later we found out that the surgeon nicked a blood vessel there.
Mom spent 2 days in icu and recovered enough for a regular room,still no visitation Except by phone but after a short while there She got worse.
After DAYS of no phone someone figured out she was bleeding internally whenher heart stopped
They fixed THAT but it was all to much on a 82 year old woman and she steadily declined and passed.
After over a month of hospitalization she was allowed visitors the last two days of her life.
I’m not saying the staff didn’t do their jobs but they didn’t know here like we did.
I’m sure we would have caught the problem days earlier. Not to mention have been a important morale boost.

NEVER allow a loved one to be alone in a hospital NEVER
Sorry about your mom...Maybe we should wait two yrs after you're over the mourning period to discuss this rationally.

You don't want to hear it now, but one could question the rationale of submitting an 82 y/o for surgery for a non-life-threatening condition....Without an autopsy, you can't know that the surgeon nicked an artery...Coagulation problems secondary to DVT/PTE prophylaxis in the post-op period is much more likely.....Would a pt be better off staying home, suffering & dying of their disease naturally, or taking a chance and trying to have it fixed? The risk of anesthesia/surgery is about the same as the risk of dying in a car accident on the way to the hosp....What did this have to do with CoViD?

BTW- I revisited here to adjust my last post-- Maybe think about it this way-- if the immunity rate is 5%, then an infected guy spreading the germ can give it to 95 of every 100 people he comes in contact with...If the rate is 95%, then he can only give it to 5 of every 100....THAT'S what stops the spread, not hiding and hoping you don't get it.
 

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My 90 year old grandmother died last April.
Alone in the hospital, and NO ONE was allowed to visit.
She didn't have the Rona. She was just old. She was very deaf and the nurses couldn't figure out her hearing aides, so no phone calls.
The end of her life was a tragedy that I will never understand.
 

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i think you'll find in the end a lot died who shouldn't have from being shut off from family and just giving up and whatnot. a 90 something lady just had assisted suicide this week because she didn't want to go through another shutdown.

i didn't know we could unless we were terminal but it definitely happened. i'd go for it myself rather than be shut in. look at all those poor old people that were left alone in their beds with sores big enough to put a fist through. if push comes to shove and i'm able i'll take something rather than go in there. it's pitiful to hear the family on radio . i think i'm lucky . i'm use to being alone. and i got lots of room inside and out. i don't have any family except my son. i left many years ago. i dont miss it like some with big families around ~Georgia
 

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Now that we are all on the same page about restricting people's freedom for the sake of saving lives, I think it's high time we talk about seniors on the road. Seniors are 16 times more likely to cause a traffic accident, and are more likely to die as a result of that accident. Accidents are far more deadly than Covid. If we care about Grandma, we need to pull her license before she hurts herself or others. And it can't be left up to her and her family, it must be mandated. Yearly road driving tests for all drivers past 65.
 

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Covid killed my mom.
Mom went in for bladder surgery just be for the restrictions hit. They found some infection and transferred her to a “Better “ hospital . We were not allowed to visit there. Later we found out that the surgeon nicked a blood vessel there.
Mom spent 2 days in icu and recovered enough for a regular room,still no visitation Except by phone but after a short while there She got worse.
After DAYS of no phone someone figured out she was bleeding internally whenher heart stopped
They fixed THAT but it was all to much on a 82 year old woman and she steadily declined and passed.
After over a month of hospitalization she was allowed visitors the last two days of her life.
I’m not saying the staff didn’t do their jobs but they didn’t know here like we did.
I’m sure we would have caught the problem days earlier. Not to mention have been a important morale boost.

NEVER allow a loved one to be alone in a hospital NEVER
Sorry to hear about your mom, that is heart wrenching.

I grew up hearing over and over again from my grandma (who was a surgical nurse going back all the way to WWII), "Never go into a doctor's appointment alone. Never go into the hospital by yourself. Write all over yourself if you have surgery and make sure you have someone with a good head on their shoulders with you the moment you're allowed to on both ends of the actual operation." From my large amount of experience with a disabled child that required a lot of medical care, grandma was absolutely right and I was able to stop something potentially deadly from happening to my kid at least two times because I followed her advice. Terrifies me that people can't have advocates with them anymore in these situations.
 

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Now that we are all on the same page about restricting people's freedom for the sake of saving lives, I think it's high time we talk about seniors on the road. Seniors are 16 times more likely to cause a traffic accident, and are more likely to die as a result of that accident. Accidents are far more deadly than Covid. If we care about Grandma, we need to pull her license before she hurts herself or others. And it can't be left up to her and her family, it must be mandated. Yearly road driving tests for all drivers past 65.
That's crazy talk. Rather than punish gramps and grams, let just have a perpetual license fee scale, based on age.
Sort of how life insurance premiums work.
Driver's license, as well as vehicle plate renewals, are a plum when it comes to state tax revenue.
Like cigarettes and cancer, the state cares about people, but the state likes revenue enhancements better.
 

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Some very good posts in this thread.

I have had to re read several posts containing the phrase ie "Not allowed out without papers."
I'm not sure I am more stunned to read that it occurs in the United States or that people willingly comply.
Oh, don't worry... I would never willingly comply. If my normal life had me out and about at night you can bet I would be exercising my rights as an American. It's my duty as an American
 

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In all seriousness, (I dont do this here very often) you are totally correct. In my little part of the universe my MIL had a stroke. My wife and I have been her caregiver for over ten years now. She was ambulatory and mostly on her own with a few exceptions. Anyway, she had a stroke and went to the hospital. No one was allowed to go visit. Then she went to extended care "rehab". No one was allowed to visit........

Rant on....

Once the Medicare ran out......

She was kicked to the curb. I went to pick her up and had to literally PICK HER UP and put her in the car. I asked the nurse what kind of "rehab" were they doing. "Oh, state of the art"......

BS....

Rant off...

Fast forward 3 weeks after home care she is on a walker and can actually now go to the bathroom on her own. My wife has quit her job ( no biggie for us really but for others it might be) to be here 24 hours a day. We have cut income plus I have to come out of pocket for her insurance now. I am really grateful we can shoulder this but this is what we have come to. If we had been able to at least visit her we could have seen her condition and intervened. Not all health care workers are "heros". I used to be am EMT and I know first hand they are not. Some are there just for a paycheck and to get on FB or Tweet to friends. The in home rehab guy is awesome. He cant believe the progress she has made. t really is very simple though. Once you are around family in your last days you do better. My wife has no formal training she just cares about her mother. When someone that cares is around, often that is all that is needed.

No one seemed to care about her at the "professionals" place of work though.

We can point the finger at each other but to keep loved ones from seeing their family is cruel and unusual punishment. Cant make me see it otherwise.
My father and every person in his 'community' in an dementia care facility are currently locked down in their rooms indefinately.

I've been told many times that this is for the greater good and asked many times on here why I should have the right to infect others.

The infection didn't come from me or any member of any other patient's family and just as I had predicted, it came from three staff members.

My aunt is also in a private care facility and when my cousin was allowed to visit her mother, she was complaining about being hungry. When the kitchen staff was asked about her lunch, she was literally told, 'we didn't realize she wanted to be fed but if she wants a meal, we'll gladly get her one.' Up until then, I was of the impression that food was somewhat essential to survival.
 

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i think you'll find in the end a lot died who shouldn't have from being shut off from family and just giving up and whatnot. a 90 something lady just had assisted suicide this week because she didn't want to go through another shutdown.

i didn't know we could unless we were terminal but it definitely happened. i'd go for it myself rather than be shut in. look at all those poor old people that were left alone in their beds with sores big enough to put a fist through. if push comes to shove and i'm able i'll take something rather than go in there. it's pitiful to hear the family on radio . i think i'm lucky . i'm use to being alone. and i got lots of room inside and out. i don't have any family except my son. i left many years ago. i dont miss it like some with big families around ~Georgia
I just read this morning the new hospital policy on end of life time with family members is being done by 'virtual visitation'. That doesn't sound overly comforting.
 

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I just read this morning the new hospital policy on end of life time with family members is being done by 'virtual visitation'. That doesn't sound overly comforting.
But no matter who happens to be in the room at the time, there's still two things we'll all do completely alone-- be born and die.
 

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The stories here are breaking my heart. My condolences to everyone who has lost someone or carrying emotional stress.

Something to consider ; we are not born alone, nor do we die alone. We are never alone. God/Source/Goddess/The Great Spirit is always with us, within us.

I do not mean to undermine the importance we have to each other here on earth. It is a tragedy that humanity is being so emotionally crushed by the current world situation.

But maybe we can take comfort in knowing that our loved ones are held by and cared for by something bigger than us.
 

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You don't want to hear it now, but one could question the rationale of submitting an 82 y/o for surgery for a non-life-threatening condition....Without an autopsy, you can't know that the surgeon nicked an artery...Coagulation problems secondary to DVT/PTE prophylaxis in the post-op period is much more likely.....Would a pt be better off staying home, suffering & dying of their disease naturally, or taking a chance and trying to have it fixed? ....What did this have to do with CoViD?
It was her choice to have the surgery.
Why would anybody else have any input?
As for the nick apparently they had to find it to fix it and that is what the surgeon told me the problem was.
What does it have to do with Covid ?
Covid was the excuse the hospital used to deny any witnesses access to my mother And yes and I would quite happily pull the trigger on Godless heathen that made the rule.
I don’t need to have time to mourn to know the hospital killed my mom for their convenience.
I have said For years anyone in the hospital needs A personal full time advocate. Belive me I went nuts when they barred me
 

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People that even suspect they have symptoms should stay home. I did even when I had the runs one time because it "might" have been something.

Even enjoyed the day off.
Posted 11/21/20 6:24 PM CST

With a case of runs, you played it smart. Imagine if you were wearing light colored khakis and a marathon race started in your britches.

I remember once on a company self evaluation questionnaire as part of our raise review asked what we considered our greatest accomplishment to date.

Being just out of college, cocky in attitude and thinking the question was total BS because in business while some are puffed chest leaders and others humble followers , it's up to the bosses to figure it out and the employees only do their job to the distance they can, so I answered that my best accomplishment was learning to be fully potty trained and taught to properly clean my hiney between 3 and 4 years of age as a nose thumb flip answer.

I ended up having to explain to every boss above me to the senior V.P. of our company that regardless if if I had become a great scientist , national or world leader . 5 star general or founder of a successful start up company or the R&D lab support guy I was, if at age 25 I was still making boom booms in my pants or leaving skid marks in my drawers like a get away driver after a hold up. I doubted anyone would want to shake my hand or sit with me and negotiate deals.

It worked to end employee self evaluations but I got the shaft in that I got put on the executive's "tiger team" for contracts we were about to lose if we didn't turn them around fast
 

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HonestAbe, you have my deepest sympathy on the loss of your mother.

Older people have non-live saving surgery all the time. My grandmother had a hip replacement at age 85. My mother in law had a hysterectomy at 83. Just because they are old should they be forced to lay in bed in severe pain for the rest of their lives?

Now that we are all on the same page about restricting people's freedom for the sake of saving lives, I think it's high time we talk about seniors on the road. Seniors are 16 times more likely to cause a traffic accident, and are more likely to die as a result of that accident. Accidents are far more deadly than Covid. If we care about Grandma, we need to pull her license before she hurts herself or others. And it can't be left up to her and her family, it must be mandated. Yearly road driving tests for all drivers past 65.
I would like to know where you got information. What I found says something else;

Older people are more likely to die from an accident.

I strongly advocate taking the written test each time a license is renewed and a road test every other time. I know a lot of people who would need bus service to get to work.

If older people are too impaired to drive, they are too impaired to work. So let's lower the full retirement age to 62.

And we are not on the same page about restricting everyone's freedom. I have never been in favor of lock-downs, shut-downs or slow-downs, except for people who are sick.
 
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