Calf with goats and chicks

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by TinaNWonderland, Mar 6, 2005.

  1. TinaNWonderland

    TinaNWonderland Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    61
    Joined:
    May 12, 2004
    Location:
    Western Kentucky
    Hi!

    I have a new baby Beef Master calf that my grandpa gave me because its mom had died due to complications after giving birth. He's 4 days old, eating fine, and as cute as a button. :)

    I've bottle raised calves before, so I pretty much know what I'm doing as for that. My question comes from the fact that I have him in with a few pygmy goats and chickens, I mean he has a big stall to himselves, but these critters are gonna be his neighbors. :p Anyway, do I need give him anything special or do anything differently? I looked at some kind of calf stuff for coccidiosis, but I don't really think I need that since the chicks and goats I have haven't had a problem with that, but I just thought I'd check.

    Thanks,
    Tina
     
  2. FarmerBoy

    FarmerBoy New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2005
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    Have You had trouble with coccidiocis in your goats before?
     

  3. Christina R.

    Christina R. Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    720
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Location:
    Northern Arizona
    You are describing the exact way my gal lives. We have about 18 chickens, a turkey, and 3 pygmy goats. I bought my gal at 5 weeks old, but never had her in the same pen as where the chickens roosted. The mama goat was bought about 2 months later and immediately went in the same pen as the cow. Corabelle has since had a calf that lived in the same pen with the mama and the goats. Even though the chickens have always had their coop separate from where the cow and goats live, they are free range, so they are in the barn during the day. I wouldn't let the goats and cow live where the chickens roost, but having them around each other hasn't posed any problems for us.

    I think I remember being told that coccidosis might be specie specific, but don't take that as a fact.