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Well here are two pictures, need to take a picture of the new heifer so I can send in for registration (easier).


This is Sera, the R&W heifer. Dam is a 82pt Rubens, Gdam was an Outside, GGDAM was a VG86 Belltone. Heifers sire is Ladino Park Talent-ET RC




This second calf is Athena, little heifer born May 1st. She is a WF Brook Bomber daughter. Dam isn't scored yet, hope to in October (she should easily go high 80's, if not it'll be surprising). Her dam tested 54 first test, 74 2nd, and 68 3rd.






Enjoy!

Jeff
 

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They're both gorgeous! I like the markings on the R&W, tho' that doesn't mean she'll make the best milker, or breeder or temperament, etc. I know...but to look at, she's got IT.
 

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Do dairy calves usually look like that? I ain't a dairy person, and I'm so used to looking at pics and seeing filled out beef calves, so that's why I'm asking. Probably a dumb question anyway :rolleyes:.
 

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Yeah dairy are supposed to look "dairy". You don't want a beefy dairy cow, they tend to not milk overly well, look coarse, heavy etc. You also dont want an animal looking tall, and narrow that can blow over in the wind. Generally you want an animal sharp across the shoulders, clean long neck, long muzzle with some width to it. You want an animal with a wide chest, deep body, open ribs. You want a slant to the ribs, not extreme. You dont want something with ribs that are vertical, but ribs angled towards their legs that appear to blend right into the whithers. You want straight legs, but nothing too straight (functional). The rump should have a slight slope, with the tailhead tucked neatly between the hooks and pins. As a calf all these qualities aren't seen yet, usually take 3-5 months to start seeing something. Then takes another 10 months (breeding time) to see more improvement. But some wont show their potential till their 2nd lactation or third. It's why I strongly feel against any EX 3yr olds.

I feel a 2yr old should score only as high as VG85, MS should also be VG not EX at 2yr. As a 3yr the max score allowed should be 88, with EX not till 4. If an animal is going to deserve an EX score, they should have to mature more. There are those out there that shoot up quick, only to slide back at a young age. Remember the tallest, fanciest heifer wont always turn out to be a fancy cow. A heifer is simply a frame. What makes an animal is the udder, and a crappy udder can make the best looking heifer look awfull.

As this one person told me, the previous owner to the R&W's dam. "Not many can bring animals in as calves, then yearlings, then cows year after year. Many of these big heifer here won't be back as cows". He was commenting on the BIG heifers people strive for, so they can win due to size. Because IMO a heifer that can come in year after year into the ring, improving each time she comes is an animal you want. Not these heifers that shoot to Junior Champion, only to return as a cow and place 10th. While that 10th place heifer last year is now 1st or atleast the top 5.

There is a cow, her name is "Gaige Highlight Tamara". She is EX97 3E. Big powerfull cow, scored 100 in her legs, 100 in her frame, and so on. She placed 9th when she was first shown as a heifer, I beleive she was a summer yearling. This cow has gone on to be Nominated Reserve all american in 2002 and 1998. She placed 1st international champ Bred and Owned 1998. She has more to her name, but she went big time, even though she only placed 9th, she went on to be known across the country. Not to mention she came out of a GP83 cow, so more or less a "freak".

Sorry to get off on a tangent.


Jeff
 
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