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Icelandic Sheep
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Discussion Starter #1
I thought you guys would like to hear a true story told to me by another local Nubian breeder. Here's the story as it was related to me:

This goat breeder had a small dairy herd of Nubians that she showed. Her herd consisted of 6 full grown does and how ever many kids were produced that spring. She practiced CAE prevention and tested every year. One year during yearly testing every animal but one tested positive. Every other year her entire herd tested negative! The man that was helping her with the test was shocked and told her he'd retest for free. He retested AND shipped the samples to a different lab. Same results. Every animal but that one tested positive for CAE.

What happened?

Well, she theorizes that her herd must have picked it up at a show. The one goat that tested negative was her buck that she didn't take to the show that year. She still doesn't understand how her herd would have picked it up. Since her goats didn't mix with other's goats and it's supposed to be hard to transmit...

Unless someone put something in the water...

CAE Sabotage? Is it possible? What do you think?

RedTartan
 

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My guess is that one of those does, mayb emore, was positive all along and not stressed out enough to test positive. That can happen, and it's why negative test results for one animal alone wouldn't be enough proof for me to buy a doe. The whole herd would need to test out clear, and preferably for several years running.

Also, what test was used, AGID or ELISA? ELISA is better and more accurate.

Something people seem top forget is that CAE isn't passed only through milk of from dam raising. Pulling kids at birth and raising them on pasteurized milk will not eradicate CAE 100% if you're sloppy in other areas:

Tattooing: Do you rinse and disinfect the needles between each goat? Blood transmits CAE just as effectively as it does HIV.

Shots: Same thing, seperate needle for each goat? Sharing needles is a bad, bad idea.

Anything involving blood can be a hazard. This is another reason why I'd rather cut and burn scurs and horns than to band them. Do I want a goat with a banded horn running around my barn when I know that horn could break off and bleed all over everything and i might not find out for 12 hours? No! Everyone could be infected by that time. When you cut and burn, the blood is sealed off and cauterized. When it comes to blood, treat the CAE virus as if you were dealing with HIV.

Housing: CAE+ animals should be housed seperately.

Milking: They should be milked last, and in a completely seperate area.

Milk: one should never "play" with milk these days. It used to be fun to squirt cats or other goats in the face with milk, but when you consider that you could be spraying them with virus....not such a hot idea. After you're done milking, you should wash or santize your hands before handling anyone or allowing them to touch your hands.

At goat shows, the potential for infection can be huge. People leave buckets of milk setting out, they sometimes dump it into barrels, the milk dripping down the sides.... At fairs little kids come by and let each and every doe nibble on their fingers.... :nono: In the show rings, people udder their goats up with 18+ hours of milk which then sprays and drips all over the place...

CAE is really a pain in the neck to deal with. I tried to eradicate it from my herd once I found we'd been infected, pulled all the kids and bottle raised them on milk I had brought to a boil (so I know it got hot enough!), put the positive in a sperate pen, and I still had new positives coming up, including some of the kids I'd bottle raised. I think that once you have one positive, it becomes extremely difficult to contain the disease and get rid of it. For years mine were all negative, and they stayed that way despite stress, dam raising, etc etc...until I bought a doe that the woman claimed was CAE- but wasn't.
 

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For someone to give CAE to your adult animal they would have to have it drink milk, inject it IV with blood from a known positive...and I really can't think of another way.

I agree with Cham...positive animals didn't pop up positive in a closed herd, the animal was likely always positive. Vicki
 

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Icelandic Sheep
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Discussion Starter #4
And the whole herd turned positive at the same time? I could believe that one animal was always positive and just now tested positive, but a whole herd. All turning positive at the same time?

Something's fishy.

RedTartan
 

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If this happened to you and I could ask you questions....did you change labs, did you move from AGID testing to Elissa...how old are these goats. But when it's a friends herd, it's hersay, I don't know the person to know if she is giving you really accurate info. Alot of folks say they test, don't have CAE, but the facts are actually very different.

But no way could someone sabotoge a buck who stayed home from a show, or your does at a show, and then have your whole herd test positive. It just doesn't make any sense....abort your doe crop (yes I know someone this happened to), feed your goats out of their lambar full of raw milk (this was done to me...she thought my kids looked hungry so let them empty her babies lambar.... and I don't take bottle kids to shows anymore because of this) It's really hard to pass a virus like this. Vicki
 

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Icelandic Sheep
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Discussion Starter #6
No, the buck is fine. He didn't go to the show and is the only animal in the herd that is CAE negative now. She had the whole herd tested twice at two different labs. I think she said one was at Ohio State University and the other was in Washington.

RedTartan
 
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