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has anyone here bought land to raise livestock on that doesnt touch the land you live on?

pros/cons?

There is some land that is only down the road a short bit. Its not offically forsale but the owner has told me before its for sale if someone made him an offer on it. He currently leases it to a farmer for growing crops. My husband and I would like to raise a few cows but we only have 2 acres where we live. We could buy up to 20 acres down the road. I suppose we could lease it as well but I am not sure if the man would allow a fence to be erected on it.

We have considered moving to have more land before and its a nice spot to eventually have a house sitting.

However there is no trees on the property but I do imagine we could make a nice cow pasture out of it and start g rowing trees that eventually would bring shade and maybe 10-15 years down the road we could build another house when we grow out of this one.

Does it sound like a good idea? The soil around here isn't the best but the farmer who le-ases the land currently has done well with growing corn, carrots, and potatos on it. So we could certainly have at least grass growing for cows to graze on and buy hay from a neighbor and grain from the co op for cows.

But I just wonder, how well do animals do when they arent under the owners watchful eye? Is there problems then? Do people mess with animals who do not have their owners living right there?

Or is the way the housing market is, we should just sit back and wait for someone who already owns an established farm to go belly up and just buy their farm? If we bought this place, we would have to build a barn and everything. NOthing is already there besides the ground
 

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I'd want to live where my animals were. It just makes sense when you understand how much care they need. You'd also need water for the animals, and that means a creek/pond or well pump and electricity.
You don't say where you are located but you might need storage for feed, and certainly a barn for bad weather for the animals.

If I were you I'd buy a farm somewhere with buildings, etc, where everything is there already. Just seems easier to me.

Jennifer
 

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Most of the cows are here don't have any shelter buildings. Is there a hill they can get behind for a windbreak? If you are only talking a few cows, you can haul water to them if you need to. That is what I do for the horses. That close, I wouldn't hesitate, especially if you want to stay there locally for the long haul. I've got neighbors with 1,000s of acres and cows strung out up to an hour and a half away that they just go check on once a week!! I wouldn't be comfortable doing that and imagine most here wouldn't but at least it shows it isn't a necessity to live with your livestock for it to work. I'm trying to figure how to pick up 60 acres a couple miles down the road from me but I just want it for hay ground.
 

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agmantoo
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Having the farm separated is a true PIA. I have tracts that are apart and it seems that whatever I need, be it tools or equipment, is always at the "other" farm. The only advantage that I have noticed is that if one place catches fire there is little chance that the other burns! I lost about 20 acres of planted pines to a fire just recently. No one brothered to call to let me know that the fire occurred. I am a small scale tree farmer and I have trees in 3 states, some I have not seen in 2 years.
 

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I have my farm seperate from where I live (for now). We will probably build a house there sometime, but for now I am getting all the fence up and getting the barns built.

If you have a creek it really isn't bad. Actually, I like it because it gives me a break on the way home. "Gotta go check on the animals."

HOWEVER, I would strongly suggest getting in good with a neighbor. I have a girl that lives two houses down from the property and traded her a goat to "watch" over all my stuff. She rounded up my goats when they got out. It is good to have a second set of eyes. It doesn't cost much to hire a teenager as a watchful eye. Another good side with hiring a teenager is when you go on vacation or go out of town you can pay them to feed and water them.

I wouldn't go to far though... mine is about three minutes away.
 

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If I need a Shelter
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At one time I owned 100 acres.But I rented several hundred acres for other stuff.Only problem I had was someone set a Barn full of Hay on fire one time.

big rockpile
 

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If you already have the money up front, then buying the land now might be a very good financial investment. You could begin drawing up the plans for a new stick-built home now and do much of the leg-work (permits, ordering, contracting) throughout the winter. Then you could begin actual construction yourselves in the spring.
You could build slowly as you can afford it. If it takes 3 to 6 years to build a basic - but liveable - shell of a home, it will at least give you something to live in on your new land. Then you could sell your current home and use the profit to finish the inside of your new home and also to build your barns.

But it is probably not a good idea to buy non-attached land and cows right now if you do not have the money upfront. The economy is going to get a lot worse soon enough.

:)
 

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I read a book called "No-risk ranching".

Basically, the gent worked in town. He rented land on his route to work, which meant that he checked the cattle and their water twice a day. Also, he bought feeder cattle in the spring and sold them in the Fall, so there was no checking the stock in bad weather.
 
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