Buying a tiller...any advice welcome!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Ravenlost, Mar 14, 2005.

  1. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hubby wants a tiller. We were looking at a Murray 6 HP rear tine (18 inch) chain driven cultivator. Any suggestions? Don't know the price...none of them had prices and we couldn't find a sales person!

    Called my mom and she said front tine is easier to manuver, rear tine digs deeper. What else do we need to consider?
     
  2. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have NEVER heard anything good about front tine tillers. I bought a TroyBilt and I love it. I'm not real big, but I could handle it pretty good.............tough breaking through the sod, but it got easier with each pass.
     

  3. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    BCS is the best you can buy but they are pricey. Troy-bilt is owned by MTD now and IMO are not the tiller that they were at one time. But, they're probably still better than most of the chain drive models you can get at wal-mart, sears etc.

    I would definitely go with a rear-tine. Decide how much you want to spend and buy the best tiller you can afford that meets your needs.
     
  4. mink

    mink Well-Known Member

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    by all means get a rear tine tiller....their the ''cadillac'' of tillers
     
  5. allen8106

    allen8106 Well-Known Member

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    Just make sure you buy a rear tine. They are much easier to handle. I bought a Huskie front tine from a local Tractor Supply a few years ago and it oozes oil.
     
  6. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks everyone! Guess we'll have to go back and find out how much they were. They looked really sturdy and well built so maybe we won't have to look any further.
     
  7. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I bought a Troy Built 8 hp rear tine tiller about 15 years ago. A real workhorse that is reliable and easy to control. I like using the furrow and hiller attachment for cultivation next to leeks, potatoes and such.
    This tiller does wonders on working in green manure. I've even direct tilled in the ground buckwheat that was foot tall. At harvest I've used it to direct till in tall cornstaks and it chops them up like mad. Same with squash vines after frost.
    It's a machine that can do the job for big gardens.
     
  8. duke3522

    duke3522 Well-Known Member

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    I think I would try and find an old troy-bilt. They are very tough and dependable. I got mine several years ago when a woman ran a one line ad in the paper in the middle of January that read "Old Tiller $200 Call xxx-xxxx". Not thinking I would find much I gave her a call and she didn't have a clue as to what kind of tiller it was because it had belonged to her boyfriend who stored it in her garage and he had died about two months before. Well, because it was about 15 degrees out that day I didn't have much to do so I decide to go over and see what she had. When I got there she told me it was in the back of her garage and I had to climb over a bunch of junk just to find it. But what a find! It was a like new 1993 Troy-bilt Pony that had barely seen any work at all. After spending about 30 minutes getting all the junk out of the way I got that beauty out of her garage and onto her walk between the house and the garage. I checked it out and it had a little gas in it so I set the trottle to start and gave it a few pulls. Of course it wouldn't start, but it did turn over so I knew it was in some sort of run able condition. Well while I'm out there messing with it, not believing my luck to get this tiller for only $200, the woman is standing at her back door watching me trying to get it started. So she yells out to me and says that since I can't get it started to make her an offer on it. Now I am already thinking it's a deal, but why not low ball her and we can negotiate. So I walk up to the door and tell her, in my best I can take it or leave it voice, that i don't know since it won't start, and that it's not really what I was looking for, but that I might be able to use the parts and offered her $125. To my surprise and delight she took it on the spot. So I paid her, got dear dad out of the truck, we loaded that baby up and got the heck out of there. When I got home I drained the old gas, changed the oil and spark plug, added a little new gas, and she started on the first pull. Been using her ever since.

    That night I had a Master gardeners class and I told a few of the guys how I got my tiller and the responses were "I'll double your money right now sight unseen" or "They shot Jesse James for doing that kind of thing." All of them green with envy. One of my best bargains ever.

    Duke
     
  9. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

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    After making the mistake of spending big bucks on equipment that we use once a year and have to get repaired all the time because of problems caused by leaving them sitting around unused so much of the time, I would recomend renting them instead and buying a mantis type tiller for cultivating instead.

    We finally quit buying and started renting. We rent a log splitter each winter.
    We had one that broke out a seam and oil spewed everywhere. My DH said thank God I don't have to deal with that! He just took it back and got another one. We gather wood that needs split and when we have a days worth of work we rent the splitter and get it all split and stacked in one day and just take the thing back. Costs us less than $20.00 and it would take us a life time to spend as much as one of those things cost, not counting the repairs. :)
     
  10. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hey Duke3522...you didn't happen to notice another one in that woman's garage did you? :p

    Corky, when we lived in town that's what we did...rented a tiller. Now that we're on the farm I'm pretty sure we'd need it more often. Plus, we'd have to drive 25 miles one way to rent one. Gas costs to much to do that! ;)
     
  11. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

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    I understand. You just have to do the math and figure out which is more cost effective for you.
    We wanted a tractor. We have 11 acres on the side of a mountain. We had second thoughts and bought a really good 4x4 polaris 4 wheeler and a pull behind mower for the meadow. We use that thing for all kinds of stuff we would not be able to use a tractor for around here. Finally! We did something right. :)
    Our son has built two trailers for it. One for hauling wood and one big enough to haul hay. That 4 wheeler is big and tough. Its just amazing what it can pull.
    We have no need for a tractor at all. It was expensive as 4 wheelers go but much, much less than even a small tractor.
     
  12. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    LOL...I wanted one of those Mules (made by Kawasaki?) but got a riding lawnmower instead. I still have something to ride around the property on when I need to, plus we got a free cart and seeder with it. Now, when I drive the 1/2 mile to the mailbox I can also mow the sides of the driveway...and the cart is great for hauling stuff.
     
  13. jdskidder

    jdskidder Well-Known Member

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    We just recently bought one of the rear tine bigger Troy builts. My dh loves it, he and older son 'fight' over who gets to use it. :haha:

    It was $600, but we figure it was well worth the price. They are one of the best made.

    Dorian