ButterFat and Protien by Breed

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Up North, Oct 12, 2006.

  1. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Hot off the presses from Hoard's Dairyman, here's the normal percentages of ButterFat and Protien by Dairy Cow Breed:
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    Jersey BF 4.76 Pro 3.62
    Guernsey BF 4.55 Pro 3.38
    Brown Swiss BF 4.03 Pro 3.38
    Ayrshire BF 3.91 Pro 3.21
    Holstein BF 3.66 Pro 3.00

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    :cowboy:
     
  2. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    What! No Milking Shorthorns??? :eek:

    Just giving you a hard time, :)


    Niki
     

  3. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Seriously (thread drift)- if you take a holstein that isn't being given any, what is it called BHT? - and is on pasture, and dairy quality hay + a bit of grain: would her volume be lower, but her percentages of protein and fat higher?

    Or would she just be starving, lol. I'm guessing I want to feed this dairy heifer calf what she needs, but if I don't need to encourage volume is there something I do different? I don't mind the milk - as I raise pigs. I plan on skimming cream for the family.

    Niki
     
  4. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    The percentages in the chart are, of course, averages. Individual cows can vary, and some feeding methods can change Butterfat and protien levels - but not by much.
    Nothing wrong with feeding just as you described. If it's less volume you desire, simply feed less grain, more hay & grass. PS the Milking Shorthorn would probably rank very close to the Ayrshire breed, would be my best guess.
     
  5. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    As heather said, on average those are the numbers. However depending on the farm, how they breed, many of the averages per farm can be different. Here with the holsteins, swiss and jerseys the individual test was 4.1BF 3.1Pro. The bulk tank was 3.8/3.1. Funny how the milk company is lower, which of course you cant trust their numbers, they are paying you.


    Jeff
     
  6. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Thanks UpNorth. I'll definately go that route, since I won't be shortchanging her. When I get back, I'll try to post some new pictures of the two heifer calves. I want to make sure they are getting enough grain and hay, by letting you take a look at them.

    That would be pretty disturbing to me if I had milk test proof that my milk was higher in both protein and fat than what I was being paid for - that seems wrong, very wrong - Jeff. I'm not a dairy owner so maybe it is just part of the business, but it sure doesn't seem right.

    Niki
     
  7. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

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    Jeff DHI numbers for fat, protein and SCC are notoriously unreliable. No matter how much you shake the flasks you never get a really representative sample in barn conditions. All they really give you is a comparison with herdmates, you could have cows in different herds who have the same BF but have DHI numbers way apart. We've had DHI SCCs that were three times as high as tank samples taken the same day and BF .5 lower than the tank.
     
  8. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    The same lab that tests for Dairylea, which is the DHIA lab, is Dairyone. Dairyone is run by a corporation. The DHIA I test with is Vermont, it is a not for profit organization, they aren't in it to make money. Yes DHIA is a once per month test, and the DHIA tests for production can be a tad high, when you start averaging the test. Which makes you wonder, how many cows out there that are tested for 24,000+lbs, are actually producing that in the tank. When I had the 4 tested, initial 4. They averaged 75lbs, the next test in July, shortly before I shipped showed I was making more than what the stick showed. I averaged it out, and the herd average based on the tank was lower, than the DHIA test. I beleive it was a good 15lbs lower. Now that can be contributed to several things.


    The fact there is some variance between the milk companies test, and the DHIA test tells me a few things. Now I will say this, when I got my last months test results. The day the tester was here, as I mentioned tested the tank 3.8/3.1. The Dairylea test was 4.04/3.04. The SCC was 140k. The tank test was also the same from DHIA. So perhaps they aren't all that far off. But what is important? The DHIA test, it is the offical test, it is the test that goes on a pedigree. It is the test that people look at when looking over their production. It is also a good way to see which animal is testing for a SCC number. The most important thing to me is that SCC. BF and Prot are important but aren't as important as that SCC number. Many can claim a good BF, good Prot, and brag about milk production. Not many can claim low SCC's. When these fresh cows are cleared up I will have a SCC between 60-90k.

    Keep in mind, those milk companies take out a lot. They charge 10.00 a pickup, and other costs. The new thing that could happen is an additional charge for picking you up, not because of fuel. Because there is this new "BST" free thing. So they will have to reroute trucks, so it will cost us, the producer more. So speculating with their test results is within reason.

    Jeff
     
  9. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Jeff be careful what you wish for. SCC( Somatic Cell Count) is a measurement of the number of white blood cells present. These cells are nature's way of fighting off an infection, hence an elevated cell count indicates a cow is fighting off an infection. If you have a herd in the 60-90 SCC range, you better hope none of them get mastitis, because they won't have enough white blood cells(Somatic Cells) to fight off an infection on their own.
    I would put forth that 100-200 SCC is the economic "sweet spot", and up to 300 is still economically viable. Above 300 you have a problem that needs to be addressed.

    Now see I just made your job easier, LOL, because you won't need to strive for an SCC of 60!