Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Retired Coastie
Joined
·
5,077 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
As promised, today I butchered a Boer wether that weighed approx. 70-80 pounds and was 4.5 months old. I have attached photos to hopefully assist others new to country life and the butchering their own animals. Just a few quick points if you decide to butcher by all means do it at night or in the early morning. It is just cooler, less bugs, and although it may look simple your first one will take much longer than predicted. If you pick the morning hours than do the job on the west side of a building, so the sun is off you work the longest. The photos are set up in sequential steps...
Well lets get on with it...Bon Appetite

Tools for the job....(22 revolver with CCI stinger ammo)


Goat shot and throat cut


Goat hanging from homemade gambrel


Cut off head


Skinning from top to bottom


Remove lower half of front legs


Now begin skinning the lower half


Skinning completed


Begin gutting


Gutting complete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,370 Posts
Oh. I was fine until the head in the bucket shot. I don't think I have it in me. The face is what keeps it from being "just meat." (And, well, I am a vegetarian.)

...BUT, excellent photos...they will be very helpful to many. Nice job.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,244 Posts
Great photos. This folks is a lot of what homesteading is about. Growing your own food and getting it to the familys table yourself. :)
 

·
Nubian dairy goat breeder
Joined
·
4,465 Posts
john great pictures.
i have one question, where is all the meat from the belly and back? i mean the thin skin. the gutted animals looks a little bit mutilated without the skin :rolleyes:
good idea to cut the head off first. i think the last time we butchered one we left the head on for too long and had a hard time to get the fur off. i knew something is wrong.
 

·
why hide it?
Joined
·
1,586 Posts
I'm gonna throw up.




(sorry, yall knew I couldn't resist.....and surely yall know I jest)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,259 Posts
I had the same question as Susanne about the back meat.

And another question: What is the rope around the belly about? I see it below the skin as you're skinning and then again around the hip/belly area. Just curious why it's there?

Thanks for the photos. It is helpful to see it before you try it yourself.
 

·
Retired Coastie
Joined
·
5,077 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
homebirtha, I'm not really sure which piece of meat you and susanne are referring to. I think you mean the thin belly meat on each side of the ribs and stomach. If that's the one, it's going to be ground for burger. The rope is wrapped around the carcass in various locations to help steady the animal during skinning. My kids are in college and high school right now so I have a limited workforce. I also cut holes in the hide and use them as handles while pulling the hide downward and skinning with the knife.
 

·
Nubian dairy goat breeder
Joined
·
4,465 Posts
have you ever tried to skin with water? a farmer ones told me that he only cuts little slits where the legs are, put a water hose in there and let the water do the job. he said this way the meat cools down more quickly.
anybody tried that?
 

·
Retired Coastie
Joined
·
5,077 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Susanne, no water under the skin, but I do spray the coat/hide with water before skinning. It keeps the fur hair pieces off the meat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
It doesn't look much different then dressing out a deer. I've done that before. I guess if I can get past the cute factor, I would have it made.
Thanks for posting the pics John.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,259 Posts
Yep, that's what I was talking about. Thanks for the info!

I've heard of the hose method for skinning chickens. We tried it once on a chicken and it didn't work very well, but it's an interesting idea for larger animals.

topside1 said:
homebirtha, I'm not really sure which piece of meat you and susanne are referring to. I think you mean the thin belly meat on each side of the ribs and stomach. If that's the one, it's going to be ground for burger. The rope is wrapped around the carcass in various locations to help steady the animal during skinning. My kids are in college and high school right now so I have a limited workforce. I also cut holes in the hide and use them as handles while pulling the hide downward and skinning with the knife.
 

·
Green Woman
Joined
·
1,957 Posts
BTW. The lower legs can be skinned and cut in chunks for stock with a bone saw (hacksaw can do in a pinch - no on the chainsaw - petroleum products). Brown them as you would beef bones and then simmer. LOTS of gelatin.

Alternately? They are good dog pacifiers and since they are raw food? They will eat them all and leave you alone to do the rest of the butchering.

HOWEVER. I have three dogs and there are four legs. Causes a bit of a ruckus. I figure whoever gets their leg chewed up and eaten first gets the last one.

The head can be skinned, eyes removed and discarded andthen boil the head (sans the scrambled brains). Skin the tongue before eating. Or make Souse (which I personally don't care much for) or gyro meat or meat for tacos. Delicious.

Oh. AND if you let the head set somewhere? Eventually the horn part of the horns will detach from the bone part of the horns and you have hollow horns for whatever you want to use them for. And a skull with bone horns to put on your garage... Or above your cave...
 

·
Green Woman
Joined
·
1,957 Posts
(and don't forget to save the hide for whatever use as well)...

I freeze them until I get a batch to do all at once. I haven't made hair-on hide for a while? But plan to this winter again.

Honor your animal and use what was given to you to enrich you and yours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,723 Posts
CountryDreams said:
It doesn't look much different then dressing out a deer. I've done that before. I guess if I can get past the cute factor, I would have it made.
Thanks for posting the pics John.

It is not much different from skinning a deer, except for one thing. A goat hide seems to be more firmly attached to the carcass than a deer hide. By prepared to pull harder to get the goat skin off.


I have also heard of the water skinning method and have never tried it. I just can not believe it would work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,292 Posts
I think water skinning would work, if not completely, at least to a point. We frequently give fluids to animals under the skin, and there's plenty of room for them. I'm not very big, so if it makes the job easier for me, I'll give it a shot.

Topside, what do you do with the innards? I'd want to use as much as possible, and I'm not above boiling something up for the dogs & cats.
 

·
Menagerie More~on
Joined
·
2,045 Posts
Don't waste your heat and time, your dogs and cats will adore you for raw treats!

When we butchered the wether this fall, I told DH and his mountain man friend to leave the guts and other leavings on the ground. They were already surrounded by chickens and dogs, but they still had to look at me funny! This is the kind of stuff they naturally eat, but my chickens may be velociraptors in disguise.

When we butchered the first wether, we got help from a "true" mountain man, braids wrapped in leather, everything. He handed me the kidneys and said to soak them in salt water for two hours 'to get all the p**s out', then bread and fry them quickly like liver.

THEY WERE SO GOOD! It makes me queasy to think about it for long . . . but I was so surprised, wished I'd had about three more all to myself.
 

·
Knitting Rocks!
Joined
·
5,783 Posts
Someone once told us to shoot air under the skin (with a compressor) to help with the skinning. It sorta worked, but I think that was just as labor intense as just pulling the hide off. I tried it on deer and hog. (dont like scraping hogs, I skin them!)
Anyway, I do the head thing the chicken way, pull the skin down over it, THEN cut it off, under cover sorta... lol!
We usually bury the gross intrails... like the intestines and stuff. If not then we have tons of coyotes looking around, found out from experience that we can't leave too much laying around. The heart/liver/kidney goes to the dogs along with unused leg portions.
You can also save the blood, dilute it and use it for a great fertilizer for the garden.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top