Buss fuse

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Chuck, Oct 2, 2005.

  1. Chuck

    Chuck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We have a built in microwave that quit working. I took it apart and found this fuse:

    [​IMG]

    Does anyone know how to tell if a fuse like this is blown?

    Thanks!
     
  2. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Use either an ohm meter or a powered test light. Put one lead on one end and the other lead on the other end. If the test light lights or the ohm meter shows zero resistance, then its good. If no light or ohm meter shows infinite resistance then its history.

    This really is same design as those old type glass tube fuses they used in cars or the paper cartridge fuses in old type house fuse boxes.
     

  3. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You will probably have to go to a contractors electrical supply store if you don't have a very, very good local hardware store for a replacement. They will be able to test and to tell you the amperage of the fuse. A special order would not be unexpected.
     
  4. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I agree with HJ. From my DMM manual:

    Plug the black test lead in the com jack, and connect test lead point to one of the contact points.

    Put your multi-tester on Continuity setting (looks like) this: .)))

    Plug the red test lead into the V / \ jacks ( / \ looks like headphones apparently reads "ohms").
    Connect the test lead point to the other contact point.

    Beep tone will sound when when resistance is less than 75 ohms, between the two contact points..

    Disconnect test leads after testing.
     
  5. Bob_W_in_NM

    Bob_W_in_NM Well-Known Member

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    An ohmeter would be the most straight forward way to test the fuse. You could rig up a test light and check for continuity through the fuse though.

    As far as finding one (quantity one), your best bet might be an appliance store with a service/parts department.

    When I worked at the electical wholesale house years ago, we didn't stock Bussman type SC fuses (pretty much an appliance item). I could have ordered them. If you were willing to wait a week or two until I placed my regular Bussman order, I could have ordered them with no inbound freight (UPS in this case), but you would have had to buy a standard package quantity (probably 5 or 10 fuses). I could have ordered one for you from a larger branch of our company, but you would have had to pay inbound freight from that branch which I'm sure would cost several times as much as the fuse.

    Bob
     
  6. lewbest

    lewbest Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure from the pic but if this is the same size as a regular "old fashioned car fuse" but made from white ceramic IIRC a few years back Radio Shack stocked them a few years back. Haven't checked recently though. I think the ceramic is necessary due to "internal radiation"; glass fuse won't hold up so never tried one.

    Lew in TX