Bush beans

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Abouttime, May 22, 2006.

  1. Abouttime

    Abouttime Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    412
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2005
    Location:
    Central Florida
    A good portion of my beans are coming up stem only, no leaves, or only one leaf which appears almost burnt-dark and shriveled. What is this and what can I do about it? (This is the first year this land has had a garden for many yrs, perhaps ever-grass/weeds previously)
     
  2. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

    Messages:
    19,813
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2003
    You know, I have absolutely no idea why this would happen, but would really like to hear others' ideas on what is causing the problem.

    Are you getting sufficient water? Are you sure Peter Cottontail isn't nibbling off your leaves? Insect infestation?

    {scratching head}

    Totally stumped. :shrug:

    Anyone else have this happen?

    Abouttime, it might not be too late to get some more seed in the ground. Have you considered pole beans, or do you not have enough space? (Me, I do pole beans because I get SORE harvesting the bush beans!)

    Pony!
     

  3. Lucy

    Lucy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,059
    Joined:
    May 15, 2006
    Sounds like a blight.
    Halo blight occurs primarily when temperatures are cool. Light greenish-yellow circles that look like halos form around a brown spot or lesion on the plant. With age, the lesions may join together as the leaf turns yellow and slowly dies. Stem lesions appear as long, reddish spots.

    Leaves infected with common blight turn brown and drop quickly from the plant. Common blight infected pods do not have the greenish-yellow halo around the infected spot or lesion. Common blight occurs mostly during warm weather.

    Prevention and Treatment: Both of these diseases come from infected seeds. The diseases spread readily when moisture is present. Avoid overhead watering and do not touch plants when the foliage is wet. The bacteria can live in the soil for two years on plant debris. Do not plant beans in the same location more frequently than every third year. Buy new seeds each year. Fixed copper can be applied at ten day intervals. Wait one day between spraying and harvest.
     
  4. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,801
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    South Central Wisconsin
    It ain't blight! Blight affects mature plants. Those which are just emerging from the ground are far from even having true leaves to even fall off! It sounds like they may have gone through a cold spell just about the time when they would normally be pushing the cotyledon leaves through the soil. Extreme drought during that period can also cause the plant to emerge deformed. There is also a chance that your soil was so hard that the tops snapped off while they were still in the inverted position underground.

    Martin
     
  5. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

    Messages:
    7,220
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    i have a similar problem. this will not help to pin it down as i do everything bass ackwards. i used old seeds. one pack was a year old and a bulk bag was ??? old. both kinds were planted about where they were last year.

    the germination was slow and sporadic. i planted maybe a bit early for beans. also it was wet for two weeks + solid. rain shine rain shine rain shine...that is just three hours in one day, lol. that went on for over two weeks.

    i bet if i replant using the same left-over seeds it will be ok. i think it was the wet and cool weather.
     
  6. Naughty Pines

    Naughty Pines Active Member

    Messages:
    32
    Joined:
    May 9, 2005
    Location:
    Wrightwood, California
    I know little about gardening but, my first thought was fertilizer burn. Too fresh, too much. :shrug: :nono: :Bawling:
     
  7. Abouttime

    Abouttime Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    412
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2005
    Location:
    Central Florida
    Thanks for the replies-here are answers to some of the ponderings-It was new seed-I planted several brands, some from Baker Crk, some from Lowes, some $ stores-doubt it was dryness, but cold at the wrong time, definite possibility-hard ground a definite, as these are all in individual, new raised beds, hand dug, orange clay 6" below, lots of small stones.

    These 3 bean beds are in an area where pole beans, squash and corn are planted as well-germination has been sporadic on the others (except pole beans, where it's 90% or better) but no sign of anything like what is happening to the bush beans, so I didn't think animals or disease was likely.

    Thanks again
     
  8. lshields

    lshields Member

    Messages:
    15
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2005
    Did you inoculate the seeds first? I've been reading that when planting beans in a new location you should inoculate the seeds first. I had a few bush beans do the same thing you describe and I had others close by that look just fine. I didn't inculate them first and wondered if that couldn't be part of the problem. I bought some inoculant yesterday, mixed it with water, and spinkled it over the soil. Maybe it'll help???? I will be planting some pole beans within the next couple of weeks and will inoculate them before planting.
     
  9. rocket

    rocket Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    400
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2005
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    If I get a stem-only sprout, it's usually had the leaves eaten off by snails or grasshoppers. Occasionally there's a shrivelled, dried leaf attached. But I think that's because the base of the leaf was eaten through enough to kill it, but with enough left over for it to hang on to the stem.
     
  10. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2004
    Location:
    just west of Houston Texas
    The absence of innoculating did not cause this for your beans. By all means innoculating is helpful and I would encourage it any time it is questionable whether the ground is likely to have "wild" innoculants already. I do think your way of innoculating afterwards will be beneficial. And definitely innoculate those you will be planting later.