burning dimensional lumber?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by cc-rider, Nov 18, 2008.

  1. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    Can I burn pieces of 2X4s (for example) in my wood stove? As I was building the house, I saved every scrap of wood and sorted them into piles. "Usable for large projects", "usable for small projects" and "to burn".

    Obviously, I won't burn treated wood in the house, but is it OK to burn the other? Someone told me I couldn't because of the pine tars, etc., but if I burn it hot, is it any different than burning "seasoned pine" logs?

    CC
     
  2. brewswain

    brewswain Well-Known Member

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    Oh, C C Rider, Oh see what you've done to me!
    Elvly Pressless

    .
     

  3. Lumber has been dried, so it will burn just fine. I've used train loads of it over the years, as kindling.
     
  4. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes you can burn untreated pine lumber.
     
  5. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    It will burn just fine.

    You are correct, it is best to burn a hot fire when you burn pine.

    I met a guy one that heated his entire home from pine scraps.

    Lots of urban myths and old wives tales out there, and the hogwash about pine is one of them.

    Clove
     
  6. Macybaby

    Macybaby I love South Dakota Supporter

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    I do all the time. Won't burn treated stuff though.

    DH and I have been doing a major remodel on our house. In some areas it's been more of a rebuild than remodel. Last year we salvaged what we could from what we tore out (mostly rotted on ends and stuff like that) and cut it up and kept our house warm for several months - it will burn HOT!

    I've saved a lot of the lath, it works great for kindling. I think I have enough to last ten years.

    Dh does keep an eye on the chimeny pipe to make sure we aren't getting any nasty buildups. Ours is a very easy pipe to keep clean (runs up the side on the one story house). We're building the porch now, and I've been burning the scrap - starts way easier than the split wood.

    Cathy
     
  7. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    Forgot to add, please don't burn the treated stuff.

    Clove
     
  8. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    some areas of the country have very little hardwoods, so they have to burn pine.
     
  9. tamsam

    tamsam Well-Known Member

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    Scrap lumber burns fine. We are getting all the scraps from a log home being built. The logs are about 6X6 and are all kiln dried. The lumber for the floors is oak and hickory also dried. We have hauled 3 trucks so far and not made a dent in the pile. It is going to be a 5,000 sq ft home and the guy building it owns the saw mill where we have been getting our slabs. I just love free easy to get free wood. Sam
     
  10. longshot38

    longshot38 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    i burn scrap lumber i cleaned up around mine and my dad's junk piles. if its dry, IE: not green you can burn away. its a myth that you can only heat with hard woods, my family and our ancestors have been using fir and spruce for heat for hundreds of years and my wife's ancestors have been using it for thousands of years here on this island out in the Atlantic where we are subject to some sever weather that can sweep in from the arctic or from Greenland or from the North American mainland.


    dean
     
  11. ozark mike

    ozark mike Well-Known Member

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    what is wrong with burning pine?? When you buy a cord of wood from me you get a large bundle of pine along with it ,at no extra charge, for starting your fire..this myth about pine is something that has been planted in the minds of people by someone that had never used wood to heat with, and a week after their first try wrote a book on it..they knew all there was to know, and they became instant experts...and by the way they are the same instant experts that write the books on farming, cattle and everything else after a week of experience...mike
     
  12. Sandhills

    Sandhills Well-Known Member

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    My dad that lives in CA used to only burn pine. It was the cheapest source of wood. He would get a permit from the department of forestry and for $10 a cord he could cut pine trees that were already down. He was allowed to take 5 cord a year. Pine makes a nice hot fire and the 5 cords was enough to get him through the winter. He also would keep an eye on his chimney and would clean it when necessary. I don't think he ever had a chimney fire.
     
  13. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    Awww Brewswain, why'd you take out the rest of my song?! I was impressed that you knew the whole thing.

    Hope you paid ASCAP?? <grin>
    CC
     
  14. Farmerwilly2

    Farmerwilly2 Well-Known Member

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    I heard from a friend who had an uncle that worked with a logging company owners widow that you can't burn cut off dimensional lumber since once it gets cut down into dimension all of the btu's leak out and it won't light correctly. I says to him I says "well what about stick matches, they're cut down to a little tiny dimension" and he says to me "yeah, well they have to add chemicals to the end to make em catch and burn" and I didn't really have an answer for that.

    I'd try it, but have help standing by if needed. somebody to bring you some full size wood just in case the dimensional stuff didn't work.
     
  15. longshot38

    longshot38 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    son i dont know your friend but i have burned cut offs here in my new stove and we used to burn them growing up in the furnace that we had. we got plenty of BTU'S and when i burn it here i get a VERY hot fire. big wood burns longer but round wood the same size as a 2x4 will burn just as fast if it is equally dry.


    YMMV
    dean
     
  16. Farmerwilly2

    Farmerwilly2 Well-Known Member

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    It must be the exchange rate or something. He was pretty specific. His uncle that worked with a logging company owners widow said it had to do with opening up all the pores when the lumber gets milled that all the btu's just go pouring out. He says that's why you shouldn't burn treated lumber. They plug up all the pores so's to not let bacteria and bug eggs get into the wood and rot it. Problem is the chemicals they use to treat it with can plug up the damper of your stove since they're designed to plug up holes. Said that's why folks split wood, it gets it into smaller pieces without opening up all the wood pores and letting the btu's go sliding out. Ya'll got special trees up that way work different? Part I can't figure out is if you got all these btu's a slidin out all over your sawmill how it don't get so slippery you can't walk. You'd think they'd find some kind of way to collect them so's you could use them. You know, like when they make them wood pellets for stoves. Maybe you could fortify them pellets with the extry btu's and sell super hot pellets.
     
  17. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    LOL FarmerWilly. :)

    Forget about fortifying the wood pellets, just pelletize the btus and sell them plain. I'd throw a handful of those in the stove every once in awhile if I could get them. Or wait!!! Can they make it into an aerosol? Then I could just spray it onto my fire, and the additional air pressure would help get it going stronger!!!!

    I think we're onto something, by jove!
    CC
     
  18. pheasantplucker

    pheasantplucker Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I use the untreated pine as kindling, but after it gets going, I throw on the seasoned hardwood.
     
  19. sheepish

    sheepish Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When I was a kid, for years my parents heated the house burning dimensional lumber scraps in the furnace and in the kitchen stove.
     
  20. Elizabeth

    Elizabeth Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Dimensional lumber makes great fire wood. It burns really hot, and really fast.
    I like to use it as kindling.