Bunny poo for the garden

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by cricket, Apr 16, 2005.

  1. cricket

    cricket Well-Known Member

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    I've heard different theories on the use of bunnie manure. Some say to let it rot and others say you can use it fresh if you mix it in good. What's everyone's opinion on this. I've used it fresh with some success. It's a little early in the year to tell if it did a whole lot of good though, but, the plants haven't been burned and no one is turning colors. I'm just curious since most everyone on this board has WAY more experience than I...I just started this little venture last Sept. :rolleyes:
     
  2. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    please don't feel like everyone has a lot more experience than you. we all started somewhere. and a good number of people that post on here have more experience googling stuff and cut and paste, than actual hands on experience.:)

    so, to answer your question, i use straight bunny poo, and it is very mild, breaks down in a matter of days, so the nutrients are quickly available. it is even gentle enough to use on house plants. no composting needed.
     

  3. Ann Mary

    Ann Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, I too use it "straight" in the garden. Just keep in mind that if you have fed other feeds such as hay there may be seeds from that that will sprout. Keep an eye out for them and hoe them under quickly and it won't be a problem. Roses ADORE bunny pills too.
     
  4. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    straight and top dress it,
    that being said however its SLIGHTLY compostes, before i use it, because i only cleanout under the string of cages every couple of months , as it piles up , about 3 times a year...so some of what iam applying is fresh , the rest is up to 3 months old....

    i have used it fresh without any burning of plants, i find the same thing with my goat poo too , someone told me its because of the digestion , the pelleted poop doesnt need to be composted, ... sort of makes sense i guess :D

    Beth
     
  5. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    I'm using it straight, this year. Normally I compost it in the heap, but this year, everything is going in containers or have wire mesh under it to see if I can't keep them gophers at bay.

    I have had tremendous results, so far. After 1 week, my peas and squash seeds are already up. Took about that long for the toms, too, but everything looks great! The biggest advantage is it holds in moisture. Even the toms on the wood ammo boxes are still moist after a good watering each weekend. I haven't watered the squash near where my turkey is broody in over 2 weeks. Went out there this a.m. and just 1/2" under the top was still moist.

    I just put a barrel full on my compost pile, too. I really helps in breaking down all the tall grasses and other weeds I just put on there.
     
  6. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    Back when I raised them I used it straight, both to dig in, and to top dress. It's really wonderful stuff! LOLOL, now where else but on a homesteading site would you hear that manure is wonderful!!

    hollym
     
  7. cricket

    cricket Well-Known Member

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    Only too true...Only a homesteader or someone addicted to gardening would say poop is wonderful. Thanks everyone for your helping!!
     
  8. GrannySue

    GrannySue Active Member

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    I agree with M - all of us are still learning - some have been learning longer than others, lol!!

    I have done it all ways you could think of. My best results so far have come from the current year's experiment:

    Bunnies are on straw in a gazebo. When I mucked it out, I laid it as a mulch, straw, waste and all. Peas, lettuce and spinach are LOVING it! I have always used it as a top dressing around plants that need a lot of nitrogen (haven't figured out what the % is supposed to be) whenever I cleaned but didn't have time or room to dig in.

    Sue