Bummer lambs

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by GreeleyTeri, Feb 2, 2005.

  1. GreeleyTeri

    GreeleyTeri New Member

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    I just picked up 2- two week old bummer lambs. They have been vaccinated, docked, castrated. I have the lamb replacement and started the regime last night. I am feeding 4X/12oz. warmed to 98 degrees.
    The question I have is that they were living at sea level, with cold temps in the 40's and maybe high 30's.
    We are at 3100 ft. and it is in the low 30's sometimes high 20's. I have them in the barn- concrete floor covered w/straw, but wonder if they need additional warmth for night temps. It appears they sleep together to stay warm. Thanks for any advise. I want to be a good surrogate mom.
     
  2. SilverVista

    SilverVista Well-Known Member

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    Unless you have sick or weak lambs, they should have no problem keeping comfortable in the temps you have described. They MUST have dry bedding and a pen that is free of drafts. Far more important than actual temperature is to have a facility that provides fresh air free of ammonia from urine, but without cold drafts that can cause chills and pneumonia. I like to baby them a little with deeper than usual bedding, and I keep it fluffed up so they have a little insulation around them when they are lying down. Our temps have been in the 50's during the day, and only in the 40's at night the last few weeks (MOST unusual!) and all my lambs still lie together or even in groups of 3 or 4 to share warmth and comfort. That's just lamby behavior.

    Susan
     

  3. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I agree with Sue completely but am wondering about the change in elevation too. There has to be a change in density in the air so I'd think they'd be breathign a little hard. Maybe try to be sure to keep the dust down as much as posable and watch for respritory trouble.
     
  4. John Hill

    John Hill Grand Master

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    I think your lambs will be quite OK at those temperatures as in some parts of the world sheep and lambs are outdoors in temperature like that. I think the most important thing has not been mentioned but you are already taking care of that, I am referring of course their need for good feeding.

    I am unsure about the altitude change, if you look at a graph of pressure/altitude we can see that 3000 feet is not greatly different to sea level and I expect a healthy animal would make the adjustment in just a few days but I really don't know.
     
  5. GreeleyTeri

    GreeleyTeri New Member

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    Thanks so much to you all for your replies. I feel better now!!
     
  6. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    what's a "bummer" lamb?
     
  7. mawalla

    mawalla Well-Known Member

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    GeorgeK,

    A bummer lamb, in this case, is a bottle baby. The term comes from a lamb, usually from a multipl birth, that isn't getting enough milk from it own dam so "bums" milk from other ewes.