bulk food through Walton Feed

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by MomOf4, May 13, 2006.

  1. MomOf4

    MomOf4 Well-Known Member

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    Is it just me, or is the bulk pricing through Walton Feed more than what I can buy it for at Aldi's?

    I calculated tomato powder for tomato paste - the price for the powder is twice that of the small cans at Aldi (that's calculating in the "expansion rate", after adding water, not in the powder state).

    Flour seems to be a lot more expensive too...

    Am I missing something?
     
  2. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

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    The tomato powder will last for years (and sure it's more complicated making the powder than it is the tomato paste), whereas canned tomato products will go bad in a year or so (at least mine do!)

    My problem with the bulk suppliers is that shipping adds to the bill.

    The only items I'd consider would be the long term storage items, with the good sealing systems that'd insure they were good, several years down the line...
     

  3. suehi

    suehi Active Member

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    Aldi's have tomato powder?
     
  4. suehi

    suehi Active Member

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    Never mind. I re-read your post.
     
  5. MomOf4

    MomOf4 Well-Known Member

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    No, it's tomato paste. I use it to make pizza sauce and spaghetti sauce, so I thought I could get the powder, which makes tomato paste, instead. But when you calculate the price per ounce of the paste compared to the powder made into paste, it costs more for the powder (almost twice as much).

    The site did also mention that humid areas may have problems with the powder absorbing moisture from the air - and it's humid here in Indiana.
     
  6. Randy Rooster

    Randy Rooster Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I checked out Waltons website- very interesting- Is aldis the same kind of stuff? Who has the best prices?
     
  7. MomOf4

    MomOf4 Well-Known Member

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    Randy Rooster ~ Aldi is a discount grocery store...not bulk stuff, but they call themselves "the stock-up store" because of the cheap prices. Bananas are 33 cents a lb, can veggies 49 cents, generic cereals 89-99 cents, eggs 79 cents, white bread 49 cents, wheat bread 79 cents...

    I can buy a month's supply of food, with a few exceptions of things they don't carry, for our family of 6 (plus up to 8 on weekends and entertaining) for about $250. I usually spend another $100 at other stores for other foods they don't carry. If I wanted to be really frugal and elminate some of the more expensive foods we eat, I could probably feed our family for less than $50/week shopping there. Kids just aren't ready for that yet... :)

    You can go to www.aldi.com then click "USA", then click on "store locator" to find a store near you. I found 5 in NC, but don't know if any are near you. With the cheap prices, it would be worth a trip once a month, I am sure.
     
  8. claytonpiano

    claytonpiano Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Since we order bulk wheat (and grind it), etc. then we also order the paste and other dried foods. Yes, it costs a lot for shipping, but we always try to order with 3 or 4 other families to split the cost. I buy in bulk locally also, but the tomato powder from Walton's here in Raleigh, NC keeps quite well. It is packaged well and has the oxygen absorber in the can. Next time I will buy my dried food in the largest packaging available. I also plan to keep the cans and dry my own tomatoes for use. It is possible that some things are cheaper locally, but when we ordered and divided the shipping it was much less from Walton Feed.

    By far the cheapest method is to save your seeds, grow your own fertilizer and dry the food yourself. We built our own dehydrator and have purchased our jars at yard sales and have had some given to us through the years. Yes, it takes time, but for the money, grow it, can it, and dry it. The initial investment is a lot, but after doing this for 30 years, we have saved lots of money.

    I have ordered from Walton's 3 times and after doing all of the figuring and counting every penny, Walton's was still cheaper if you divide the shipping with others. Maybe their prices have gone up since ordered last fall, but in fall of 2005, it was cheaper to order from Walton's even here in NC.