Building Your Own Log Cabin

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Grovers2, Dec 29, 2005.

  1. Grovers2

    Grovers2 Well-Known Member

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    There are some many books out these about building your own log cabin, it is confusing at best. DH & I would like to build our own cabin in the spring and would like to do some reading on the process, but which book or books? Does anyone have any suggestions?
    :confused:
    Jodi
     
  2. Jolly

    Jolly Well-Known Member

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  3. Tracy Rimmer

    Tracy Rimmer CF, Classroom & Books Mod Supporter

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    Have you considered cordwood building? I think it's much more manageable for two people building on their own. Doesn't take much by way of equipment, either, and the physical risks are less than hauling and building with logs.

    Not to mention it's so pretty! :D
     
  4. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

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    Most of the cabins at my Mom and Dad's fishing camps in Northern Maine were built of logs, but they placed them vertically. It worked beautifully, was east to build and much easier to replace a log than when they are horizontal. After the foundation logs are placed, the biggest log you have to deal with is usually 8' in length.
     
  5. patsycline

    patsycline Member

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    It's too bad my dad isn't still alive .... he'd love to talk to you about this.

    He built four log cabins back in the 50's. He did everything himself including cutting down the trees and prepping the logs. He also took photos every step of the way - I still have them [old black and whites] and it's just amazing to see the cabins in the various stages of construction. Each cabin had a different layout. For help, he had a friend and a horse.

    Those cabins were his pride and joy and I hope that whoever owns them today appreciates the love and craftsmanship that went into them.
     
  6. coalroadcabin

    coalroadcabin Well-Known Member

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    I'll give a second recommendation for Charles McRaven's book. B. Allen Mackie's book "Building With Logs" is also a very good resource.
     
  7. celina

    celina Well-Known Member

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    hello, wanted to reply yesterday but had to wait for activation....i've been lurking for a bout a month

    http://www.dickproenneke.com/

    this man built a log cabin, by himself with no modern tools in the alaskan wilderness and filmed it...pbs showed it and it was just amazing...the whole video is awesome for anyone with homesteading in their hearts.....the book is his journal he kept....just amazing...step by step..i know my library carries the book, but not the video...try to find the video...
     
  8. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Before you decide on any money or invest anything into a particular plan, be sure to talk to the building inspectors in your area. It's not always as easy as just getting the logs and putting them up once you decide on a plan.

    My father had essentially unlimited access to all the ponderosa logs he wanted in Arizona's rim country, but they only let him use the logs for the WALLS on a small (12X16) log outbuilding. Any supporting crossbeams and the roof (anything weightbearing other than the walls themselves) had to be purchased and commercially milled timber.

    Why? They had no data on the amount of weight that a ponderosa log could support so he had to use milled timber. He apparently had some difficulty talking them into the idea at all.

    There are buildings that are 125-130 years old in the area, still being used, made using the same techniques he wanted to.

    Leva
     
  9. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    Im in the process of building a cabin with poplar. I am using the butt and pass method. i researched it for a very very long time and it is one of the most flexible and easy ways to do it. Thats and you dont have to let your logs dry ofr months on end etc. I went and looked at three cabins built with butt and pass and the oldest was almost 60 years old and it still looked like new.
     
  10. frugalville

    frugalville Well-Known Member

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  11. BigBoy

    BigBoy No attitude here...

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    Here is another recommendation or at least something to think about...
    Vertical log building.
    There are fewer books and less info on this style but I like it because they don't have any settling like you do with horizontal logs. And no ledge for water intrusion. An all around simpler way to use logs for a home.
    Here is an article on it.
    http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/ainsworth27.html
     
  12. Hoop

    Hoop Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    Shows a photo of my vertical log building (a garage) during the building process. This could easily be built as a house with very minimal changes. My website http://community.webshots.com/user/hoop_john shows more of the building process.

    IMHO, vertical logs may be the most owner/builder friendly type of log building. No 40' logs to horse around. The logistics of moving logs about are definitely a challenge for most owner builders.

    I'd be most happy to answer any of your questions regarding my experiences with the vertical log building method.