Building your own hive bodies.

Discussion in 'Beekeeping' started by alleyyooper, May 13, 2006.

  1. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,404
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    For starters I will say that building your own hives and other wooden ware only saves money in the shipping. Where I live I have to drive over 7 hours to reach a supplier, or pay the shipping rates.
    For my deeps I buy 1"x12"x8' boards at Home depot for $11.75 now. 4 of these boards makes 5 deeps. It takes me about an hour to cut all the parts out for five hive bodies and since I am retired I rather enjoy the wood working. There fore I count that time as relaxtion time much as some one does fishing for example.

    Sizes for deeps. Others Mediuims and shallows only differ in how tall they are.

    Step (1. Cut the board down to a width of 9 5/8" keep the resulting strip of wood for other projects Like outer cover rims.

    Step (2. Cut the hive bodies out, the sides are 19 7/8" long, the front and backs are 16 1/4"

    Step (3. install the dado blade on the table saw and cut the frame rest on the fronts and backs. The frame rest I cut 3/4" deep since I install a metal rest that raises it back up 1/8", leave a 3/8" outer lip.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    :D Al
     
    driveone2 likes this.
  2. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,404
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    I built a dado sled to cut the finger joints used on the hive bodies. The two rails ride in the mider jig slots of the table saw.

    Bottom view.
    [​IMG]

    top view.
    [​IMG]

    Do a test cut to make sure you are cutting the slots 3/4" deep.

    [​IMG]

    Step (4. Start with the front and backs place a spacer block over the finger and cut all the first fingers (remember to cut both ends the same).
    ****Note always flip the panal 180degrees so the slots line up.

    [​IMG]

    Step (5. Remove the spacer then cut all the rest of the joints.

    [​IMG]

    Step (6. Cut all the joints in the side panals ****Note always flip the panal 180degrees so the slots line up.

    [​IMG]

    I do a test fit then drill all the holes for the nails. I also use glue in the assembly.

    [​IMG]

    :D Al
     

  3. btai

    btai Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2006
    Location:
    Georgia
    while certainly not as strong a joint as the finger joints, I just use the dado to make a rabbet joint for the sides. It's less end grain exposed, so I figure it lasts a little longer...plus it's a little easier(my carpentry skills are lacking :))

    After buying lots of Home Depot cull wood, I ended up finding a sawmill with air-dried pine for about 1/3 the price of HD's regular 1 x's. There is probably one closeby where you could find some good deals. I just find that I have to cut and assemble the boxes within a few days to avoid warping.
     
  4. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,404
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    The Dadoed butt joints work fine, but after so many years they do become looser than the finger joints. They can be reglued nailed again to tighten them up.
    If the hives are repainted or stained to begin with the end grain is sealed and not exposed.
    Not many saw mills in this area of farms. They certinally don't do any pine lumber as it has to be trucked from many miles away. They do mostly Oak, Maple and since a lot of Ash is dieing due to the Ash bore they are cutting a lot of it for handles and such.

    :D Al
     
  5. Hee Haw

    Hee Haw Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    107
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Thanks Al, for going through this step by step,I think I can do this, and I don't have a lot of experence with wood working.With your great pictures and steps,even a child could understand this.Thanks for simplfing.
     
  6. btai

    btai Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2006
    Location:
    Georgia
    Again, pardon my woodworking ignorance, but is the regular table blade larger than the dado blades & chippers? I was wondering if you can rip & dado out the frame rest at the same time, cutting out a step :)
     
  7. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,404
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    I use the same with dado to do the frame rest as the finger joints. Problem is the height is differen't. Some thing like 3/8 inch for the frame rest and 3/4 inch for the finger joint. I do the frame rest first then do the finger joints as the next step.
    PS I also use a rather cheap dado set, some thing like $30.00. I have seen them cheaper at habor freight since I bought mine.

    :D Al
     
  8. Philbee

    Philbee Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    181
    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2004
    Location:
    Western Washington
    Thank you Alleyyooper for the great photos and information on how you do the dado cuts for your beehives. I am learning a little about working with wood and I appreciate the information that you are sharing.

    Best wishes, -------- Philbee
     
  9. deaconjim

    deaconjim Appalachian American Supporter

    Messages:
    10,639
    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Location:
    SW VA
  10. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,404
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    Just did some quick math so I could be off a bit but a 4x8 sheet of ply wood would leave over 5" of waste on the side. and over 4" inches on the ends when cutting out a deep. A 1x12x8 leaves 2.5 inches on the sides (I use this to make top cover frames.) and a bit over 5 inches plus one extra piece 19 7/8 inches on the end(I have used this to make handles for the hives.).
    So 4 1x12x8's will make 5 deep hive bodies. Lowes now is selling them for $8.50 each, $34.00 and labor for 5 deeps isn't all bad Way I figure it.

    :D Al
     
  11. sustainablesam

    sustainablesam Member

    Messages:
    17
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Has anyone tried using a drawer lock router bit to make the joints for hive bodies. These bits are in the Rockler catalog on pg.133. For $37 it looks like a cost effective, easy solution for a strong joint(i think) because it looks like it creates a lot of surface area for the glue to bite and you can still use nails.

    Am i missing anything here?
     
  12. chuckhole

    chuckhole Born city, love country

    Messages:
    437
    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2006
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Soapbox time. Nails are the least desirable method for connecting wood together. More gluing surface and clamping pressure will produce the longest lasting joints. Given the time, patience and a dovetail jig, the glued locking dovetail will produce the strongest joint for the hive bodies.

    The box joint using a stacked dado blade is my second choice. Either way, you want to maximize the gluing surface. I grew up using nails for everything and have now totally reversed my way of thinking. I have been watching the Yankee Workshop and WoodWorks on DIY too much I think.
     
  13. dogger

    dogger Member

    Messages:
    18
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2008
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Hello All,
    I am going to be getting some bee's this spring and found this site again after a few years absence, and found this topic and the pictures are dead :( Is it possible that you might be finding a new host site for them??

    Thanks for your time

    dogger
     
  14. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,404
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    I'll see if I can find the pictures and redo them. Imagestation no longer host pictures.

    :D Al
     
  15. dogger

    dogger Member

    Messages:
    18
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2008
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    I'd appreciated it, thank you very much
    like your tag line
     
  16. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,404
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    Sizes for deeps. Others Mediuims and shallows only differ in how tall they are.

    Step (1. Cut the board down to a width of 9 5/8" keep the resulting strip of wood for other projects Like outer cover rims.

    Step (2. Cut the hive bodies out, the sides are 19 7/8" long, the front and backs are 16 1/4"

    Step (3. install the dado blade on the table saw and cut the frame rest on the fronts and backs. The frame rest I cut 3/4" deep since I install a metal rest that raises it back up 1/8", leave a 3/8" outer lip.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    :D Al
     
    Glenndmoore likes this.
  17. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,404
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
    I built a dado sled to cut the finger joints used on the hive bodies. The two rails ride in the mider jig slots of the table saw.

    Bottom view.
    [​IMG]

    top view.
    [​IMG]

    Do a test cut to make sure you are cutting the slots 3/4" deep.
    [​IMG]

    Step (4. Start with the front and backs place a spacer block over the finger and cut all the first fingers (remember to cut both ends the same).
    ****Note always flip the panal 180degrees so the slots line up.
    [​IMG]

    Step (5. Remove the spacer then cut all the rest of the joints.
    [​IMG]

    Step (6. Cut all the joints in the side panals ****Note always flip the panal 180degrees so the slots line up.
    [​IMG]

    I do a test fit then drill all the holes for the nails. I also use glue in the assembly.
    [​IMG]

    :D Al
     
  18. dogger

    dogger Member

    Messages:
    18
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2008
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Thank You Sir
    I like that sled jig
     
  19. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,404
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Location:
    Michigan
  20. Drizler

    Drizler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    333
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2002
    I use locally sawed planks and 2 by for nearly everything I do nowdays. Quite a bit cheaper, support the local working slob and in many cases cash and carry avoiding that 8 percent stolen by NY:rock:. All I do if I want them nice is give them a lick with the belt sander or planer. Still, for most things they work fine just the way they are as they did 200 years ago, no special handling and drying needed. Is there any reason rough cut wouldn't work to build my own this summer to get into this next season. Which woods work the best?