Building with stone

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by spam4einstein, May 14, 2006.

  1. spam4einstein

    spam4einstein Well-Known Member

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    Im thinking about building my 30x40 shop with stone. $12 ton is the rate for stone here. Seems it will be alot less $ than poured concrete walls. Am I missing smething? I have lots of time, so thats not the major issue.
    Thanks
    A yard of concrete is about $75 and weighs 3700lbs.
    3700lbs or stone will cost me about $23 and may be $35 per 3700lbs. with mortar.
     
  2. stanb999

    stanb999 Well-Known Member

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    Well that probably isn't building quality stone. The stone you need for building would be cobble or bigger. most processed stone is much smaller than that.
     

  3. spam4einstein

    spam4einstein Well-Known Member

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    There are lots of quarrys around. I wasnt thinking of processed. I assumed I coud get it in most any size, but Ill have to check on that as building with processed stone would be pretty time consuming LOL!!!
     
  4. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what kind of stone you'll get for that price, I just paid $9.75 per ton for gravel. Stone around here goes for $100+ for a pallet, not a lot of stone.
     
  5. FourDeuce

    FourDeuce Five of Seven Supporter

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    Are you planning to build it yourself? Working with stone is a skill that takes some effort and having some experience would be very helpful. From what you've posted it doesn't sound like you have done any stone work. Taking on a project of this size would be a MAJOR challenge for a beginner. Just learning to choose good building stone takes a while to learn. Using them properly could add quite a while to the process. A 30X40 building made of stone is quite a project to tackle. :eek: There's more to building with stone than just stacking the rocks up. :confused:
     
  6. Wildoutdoorsmen

    Wildoutdoorsmen Active Member

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    I have built many things with stone. As a homestead/pioneer living person, many of the stones on old homes are no more then stones found in a field or creekbed. I get stone for around $20 per ton. The smaller the more expensive. I have a friend that as built out of cobble construction stone(stone you see at construction entrances to keep dirt off road).

    It does take skill to do it properly and is not just a matter of costs/compared. I have built stoves, fireplaces, veneers, smokehouses and low foundations(less the 4'). As a note, a 30x40 building is quite a project for the first one. But, I will not tell you you can't do it. It will be just a long and learning project. As a rule of thumb, the base has to be at a ratio of 1 to 4 for height. If your walls are to be 8' high, the base needs to be 2' mininum. At four feet high it will need to be at least one foot, but I would prefer 16 inces. An alternative would be 6 or 8"block with a stone veneer. This is a good method for starting out and very strong.
     
  7. spam4einstein

    spam4einstein Well-Known Member

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    Well, I havnt worked with stone much. I do have a strong background in the trades though. I think part of the point of this is the joy of doing something cool and cheep. If I did use standard block, then I would just leave it. Spending extra money on cosmetics to make something look like something its not bothers my design sense. Anyone have a book to recomend. I have seen a bit on slip form.
     
  8. texican

    texican Well-Known Member

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    I'm building my home out of stone. Unloaded a ton this afternoon off the trailer. Locally, the fancy stone is 180 to 360 a ton... I'm using a construction stone at 30/ton... the guy who loads usually gives me twice as much as he's supposed to.

    I'm spending about 4x more than I figured on in cement for mortar. I'm also backfilling with concrete. My time is sorta free. Find I'm spending 10x more in time than I'd guesstimated...

    You're going to find it really slow going if you're building structural walls out of stone, instead of just a veneer of stone.

    My advice... get lots of skin and hand lotions... if you don't have callouses now, you will...

    a practice wall, and retaining wall pic is at http://static.flickr.com/40/96333173_0083afd421_o.jpg
     
  9. Boleyz

    Boleyz Prognosticator, Artist

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    I've laid a lot of rock on my house and fireplace, and I can tell you, it is hard work!

    Savin' a few bucks ain't all it's cracked up to be if you don't get finished before you're dead of old age...

    I'll say dittos on texican's post...mortar is hard an the fingers/hands...even if you wear gloves, it seemed my hands were always cracked and dry. Anyway, here's my fireplace...it's creekrock laid over block bottom and plywood walls covered with chicken wire.

    My fireplace has no chimney or flue...those are ventless propane logs. Heats good...looks AWESOME!!

    [​IMG]
     
  10. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..........texican , did you pour a concrete footing with rebar as a datum to start laying your rock on , Or did you just start right at ground level . I couldn't really tell . I believe I'd want a solid concrete footing with rebar about a foot wide and atleast 16 inches deep . thanks , fordy... :)
     
  11. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'll second or third that you can build it out of stone, but I don't think you'll get a cheaper building doing it as compared to block or concrete, and crete would no doubt be the stronger building. For a nice stable building I'd want building stone, not rubble. You'd end up with the scene you always see from somewhere in turdistan after an earthquake. Still, it's your choice, and I'll wish you luck with whatever you go with. That and my final advice to anyone building with stone, if you're not using lime mortar than mix your portland with coarse sand and mix it P-ss poor.
     
  12. roughingit

    roughingit knitwit

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    Depending on your climate, there's more than one way to build with stone. I've seen pictures of houses in Italy that were dry-stacked stone with slate roofs. Poking around on the internet:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trullo
    http://www.geocities.com/trullihouses/
    http://www.stoneshelter.org/stone/trullo.htm

    [​IMG]

    The stoneshelter site has a number of other dry stacked stone methods too it appears. Not sure if that's what you're looking for, but I thought they were pretty neat looking when I forst saw them!