Building Costs For A ...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ChiliPalmer, Sep 27, 2005.

  1. ChiliPalmer

    ChiliPalmer Well-Known Member

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    There are a couple of structures we're planning to put up but I'm having a hard time finding costs of their materials. I need to know what these things will cost so I can enter it into the budget. If anyone has built any of these and knows an approximate cost (well aware that local prices vary), I would appreciate it.

    A root cellar built inside an unfinished, unheated basement with a concrete floor. Approximately 6X9, one door swinging out, 12" deep shelving of any material along one 9' wall (18" spacing for shelves).

    A six-stall barn with hayloft. Hayloft extends 3/4 through the interior.


    Additionally, which would be the better option: solar panels to run a drilled well or installing a hand pump. Can you install a hand pump? How much would it cost (per foot of well depth or figure either 120ft or 300ft into calculations)?

    Thanks a bunch.
     
  2. sidepasser

    sidepasser Well-Known Member

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    I know nothing about costs of a root cellar.

    Six stall barn with hayloft - depends on what the materials are? Salvaged lumber built yourself, probably 2,000.00 including the roofing. Purchased lumber with a concrete aisleway floor and metal roof - 12 x 12 stalls, could go as high as 25,000 depending on what type of lumber, what area of the country you are in and whether you do the work yourself or not. Concrete block barns last longer, don't require much maintenance, and can be painted, stuccoed, bricked or otherwise covered later. Also cheaper on insurance as well. Costs less than wood if you can lay block yourself. It's not hard, once you get the hang of it or hire someone to show you how, it is just a lot of work!!

    Anything made with lumber right now is going to be expensive as building materials have shot through the roof. Personally, I would determine what you can do yourself and what you would need hired done (i.e. foundation, footers, roof install, whether or not you want electric, running water (always a good idea in a barn, toting buckets is awful, especially in winter) and then draw it out, determine size, and check local building material prices. Also get three estimates from local builders and I think you will see if you do most of the work yourself, you will save a bunch of money. It's hard to say how much you would spend as prices are so different depending on what you actually want and can do yourself.

    Sidepasser
     

  3. tramp

    tramp Active Member

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    I've been trying to do the same thing. Only thing I can suggest is, go to
    Lowes.com........they've got prices for pretty much everything you'll need. I sat down and did a scale drawing of the cabin we want to build.....makes it easier to figure out exact amounts of materials required. GOOD LUCK!!!

    Paul
     
  4. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For budgeting purposes, you should add somewhere between 25 and 50% to the costs you determine NOW for increases due to transportation and hurricane rebuilding efforts.
     
  5. WindowOrMirror

    WindowOrMirror ..where do YOU look? Supporter

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    We just built a 40x40 6-stall barn. The wood pole building and metal sheathing was around $15,000. Labor would be well more than that amount again if I didn't do a lot of the work myself.

    Buildings ALWAYS cost more than you think they will. In fact, they usually cost WAY more than you think they will. Our barn does NOT have a hayloft. A hayloft will add some cost.

    Where is your frost line? Concrete is extremely expensive right now, steel is worse. A decent rule of thumb would be $25-$40 per sq/ft for a finished "I don't have to touch a thing" building (add electrical and water service costs). Materials cost would be roughly half that (new).

    Root cellar built in an existing basement? few hundred for materials straight from the Home Despot.

    Hand Pumps: There are limits to the draught on a hand pump. I seem to remember that much over 30' is an issue.


    R
     
  6. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    Lehmans (www.lehmans.com) has good information on hand-pumped wells, and they sell everything you should need to pump, once the well is drilled. I don't know much about solar water pumping, except that DC pumps are expensive and hard to find. You might be better off with a 240V inverter, if you can find one. Even better would be a windmill pump and a holding tank.
     
  7. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There are _so_ many variables. Your location is needed, to figure in snow loads, or regional shortages (higher prices), frost line considerations.... And so on. Wind load, local code, ....

    Many box store lumber yards have touch-screen estimators for standard buildings, run through one of those for a ball-park price in _your_ location. They also sell self-build plans for $20 or less, you can take the materials list & price it out. No idea if you want pole barn, dirt floor, etc. Doing your own labor, or having it turn-key... All that sort of thing.

    As others say, prices will rise 15-33% as we go through these fuel prices, steel prices, and increased govt funded construction of the South...... As a guess.

    Sounds like you will have a deep well with the pump at the bottom of the well, submurged pump? That would be the best from the info you have supplied anyhow?

    From that, you would need a _lot_ of solar panels to make the amps you need to run such a 220v pump, probably 15 amps at least for start-up. The cost of such a solar system becomes too much. You are better off with a generator with 220v output - need to account for the start-up draw, likely not the _smallest_ unit you can find, but a 5-6000 watt setup.

    A hand pump from such depths requires a big enough casing to handle it's own drop pipe, and a rod down the middle of that pipe with the actual pump at the bottom. These get expensive and frankly don't deliver a lot of water for the effort required. Not against them, but have practical expectations.....

    Need to know where your water line is, if you can get by cheaper with a surface hand pump, but a hand pump at the surface can only 'pull' water 25 feet or so, you will likely need the deep hand pump with the workings at the bottom.

    Root cellar, some 2x4s, sheetrock, and shelving material? Look through the box store flier & price it out for the amount of materials you need. Prices are changing, hard to give good numbers these days that will be good for the next 6 months....

    --->Paul
     
  8. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    I made the floor from slabs we got from Home Depot waste -- next to a big bin -- the slabs of pavers where slightly chipped -- FREE. The wood on the wall -- excess 1 x 6 T&G Pine, the stairs -- old 2 x 8 pieces, the shelves from a rental renovation -- took out the cupboard doors to put in mirrored doors. Bought the insulation -- 8" against the dirt, and at the ceiling, and wire for lights and receptacle. Total cost, less than if all new material -- you can figure it out, add up all the things you need -- check costs at HD, etc.

    [​IMG]
    Under Construction, plastic vapor barrier against dirt, slabs from HD, and framing

    [​IMG]
    shelves from old doors, and slabs from HD throw-away

    [​IMG]
    Vent pipes on each side of house can be opened for ventilation and/or cooling, if required.

    [​IMG]
    Stair of old 2 x 8 and T&G 1 x 6 pine

    BTW Temperature stays between 40 and 50 F all yerar.

    Good Luck ,

    Alex
     
  9. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Alex, you could write the book on recycling, and I hope you are keeping a journal.
     
  10. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    Ramblin,

    OK, if you promise to buy one, then I would sell one.

    Alex
     
  11. farmmaid

    farmmaid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Alex: Your root cellar looks wonderful. It is VERY important to have air flow and ventilation. Suggestion: The shelves should be away from the walls about 2" and slated not solid. Good rule is 2" space between wall and shelf with the shelf made of 2" wide strips of wood placed 1" apart to the width you wish...Joan :baby04:
     
  12. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Alex,

    I'll buy one, but not until the story is a little farther along. I want to see what you make of those buildings/fuel tank you just brought over to your place. Keep the pics to a max. They make the story come alive.
     
  13. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    Ramblin,
    No more work on sheds, until I get part of the log cabin logs and roof back to our place, and we won't do that until end of Oct, beginning of Nov. So your book will be somewhat delayed. Maybe we should just stick with the posts for now, with pictures of course.

    farmmaid,

    Thanks farmmaid. You know, I filled in the back of some of the shelves with a ripped piece of wood -- they were 2" wide, to make the fronts even -- on some shelves, guess I could take those out. And I do have my vent pipes, haven't used them though. Thanks for info.

    Alex