Building a roadside vegetable stand

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by HilltopDaisy, Nov 28, 2005.

  1. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Do you have a stand at your place? I've been playing with the idea of erecting a covered stand this spring and would like your input. I think I will use pressure treated 4x4's as corner posts and make the structure 8' square. The front will be 7' high, and the back sloped to a little over 6'. I would use 2x4's to add stability to the back and sides, but actually leave it fairly open. Possibly use the white plastic trellis-type stuff that comes in 4x8' panels, on the back and sides, to buffer the wind, and steel on the roof. Total around $100. A table inside, maybe a dorm fridge for eggs, not really sure...... Your thoughts?
     
  2. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    I would make the front higher than 7 ft. Also, for appearance sake, I would think wider would get more people to stop in. Otherwise, I think it sounds pretty good.
     

  3. bob clark

    bob clark A man's man

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    pay as much attetion to form as you do to function.the first thing you need to do before selling anything is to git them to stop. the heavyer to traffic the more importante the looks are
     
  4. sros990

    sros990 Member

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  5. Randy Rooster

    Randy Rooster Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Just my opinion, but youll never build that stand for less than a few hundred dollars.

    I have had a stand inthe past- I used one of those portable 10x20 foot steel frames with the tarp over the top- to guard against high winds I put a t post in the ground at every leg and tied it off. Works great- plenty of room and at the end of the season you can take the tarp or the whole thing down -or even move to another location easy enough. I bought mine at lowes for less than $200.
     
  6. bluelacedredhea

    bluelacedredhea Well-Known Member

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    Something else to consider/research before you start to build and that is local bylaws.
    It's often easy to get around building codes and bylaws if the building you put up is out of site. But one at the roadside hoping to attract attention has the potential to attract unwanted attentions as well.
    So, if your area is like the one I live in, a permanent structure means building permit, insurance, agricultural zoning, etc..

    But a structure on wheels, such as a gussied up haywagon means NO building permit, and the ability to remove it from the public eye if need be.
    Just something to think about.
     
  7. abbey_tor_acres

    abbey_tor_acres Well-Known Member

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    I have been thinking of doing the same thing at our farm. We are just getting established. We have no zoning laws and no restrictions if the building is under so many sq ft.

    I really like the wagon idea :clap: :happy: --if you can find a wagon for a good price. maybe at a farm auction.

    I also have been thinking about using a small greenhouse made out of pvc pipe and doubled/tripled plastic sheeting to grow vegetable transplants and selling those early in the season at the garden shed then adding the vegetables when in season. I would have my dh cut telephone poles for the posts for the garden shed. We get them free from our local electric company--he cuts them with a chainsaw and we take them home :D and then use metal roofing from leftover projects. So far free!!! :happy: :happy: We pick up free 2 x4's and plywood from motorcycle shops (what they were shipped in). Sometimes you can even get good solid oak No money spent so far!! :clap: :happy: :dance:

    To keep the garden shed in people's mind during the winter you could decorate at Christmas or leave mini lights on all year. I would use a sign to advertize a few weeks before you open to get people excited about stopping. How about a prize (free transplant?) to the first day's customers or the first 15 people to buy something?

    Just throwing ideas off the top of my head :D

    bye,
    Vicki

    P.S. I just thought you could place a few free pallets down on the ground covered with free plywood for a flooring so people could keep their feet dry--Today it is pouring down outside my window ;)
     
  8. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    One word about marketing. (OK it's a few words)

    Build it so that you can completely fill it on any given day. People will stop at a full 4X4 stand much more quickly than at a 4X8 stand that is half full. Take a lesson from the big boys (supermarkets) - their produce displays are always tilted from back to front - it's partially for ease of stocking, but also for the visual effect (looks like more than it is).
     
  9. bob clark

    bob clark A man's man

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    dido on the full table ,found that out at farmers market.
     
  10. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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