Building a log skidder

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by desdawg, Jan 8, 2005.

  1. desdawg

    desdawg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    205
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Arizona
    I posted this on another thread and was thinking about building something similar. How would you go about creating the U-shape piece? I have a tubing bender but have never tried bending square tube which is what this appears to be.

    http://www.baker-online.com/DOCUMENTS/log_skidder.html
     
  2. Timber

    Timber Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    87
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2003
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    The U tube looks like an inexpensive way for the manufacturer to build the frame. Three pieces of 3' sq. tubing welded with 45 degree gussets in the top corners should achieve the structural strength. Being I skidded a few logs, what seems to me, that I could count on being wheel-less, or being in need of a very bad alignment just after the first day. But then again, I can see mud, rocks, and tree roots as an adversary.
    I would for the longevity of the skidder, replace the ball with a Lunette type Ring for a pintle hitch.

    Timber
     

  3. sherwood

    sherwood Active Member

    Messages:
    30
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    This is the way I Skid logs.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,859
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2002
    Location:
    central idaho republic
    A similr version of the baker can be built without bent tubing, just using a triangle.

    An old horse skidder told me to just make an axle from an old volkswagon, with either a "u" or "v" hook a 2 foot pole to it protruding 2 feet on one side ten feet on the other, short side hook the opposite end you are gonna pull, long side tie it down to the log.... it actuall over balances and makes the front heavy enough to drop in the dirt if it tries to run on you..... thyis would be excellent for a 4 wheeler as well as the log wont end up huerrting the machine....

    otherwise ive skidded logs with a wheelctractor using a chain, choker, and even tongs.... It helps if you have a draw bar hitch for a 3 point hitch to lift the log a little off the ground similar to way the baker arch works.

    Another one to look at is at Baileys logging supplies under the "road, log and ATV trailers sections under accessories.
    Ideas come from a myriad of places.

    William
     
  5. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,282
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    Whiskey Flats(Ft. Worth) , Tx
    ...............I had alook at that log skidder made by Baker . I could build one better than they sell for 800 . Looks like to me that 2 inch x 1/4 inch wall thickness square tubing would work very nicely . What i would do would be to cut the first angle at 45 to get your width , then for the second set of bends I'd cut another 45 but rotate the pieces where you only have a 22.5 degree angle which should end up with two parallel sides (I think) which is where you will weld the short spindles that each tire will mount to . I thought about even mounting a small 12vdc winch , say a 2500 pound capacity on the skidder then you could simply use a set of grapples to grab the log and drag it back to the skidder . Seems to me that would keep you from having to back up to each individual log , especially if your gathering up logs in a real tight working environment . There is always a Better way to improve an Existing device if your motivated to experiment , which I would be , fordy.. :)
     
  6. desdawg

    desdawg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    205
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Arizona
    Good ideas. I don't have a tractor at the mountain property so I wanted to use my Polaris 700. Much easier & cheaper to transport back and forth. I saw this picture and it looked like a workable plan for the trees we have which aren't huge. In fact I will probably wind up building cordwood style.
    This looked like a fun project. I have most everything to do it with except the U. I have some square tube, mobile home axles I can chop (I think the spindles off a MH axle will handle it), scrap iron pile and a welder. Might have to go with the square corners and gussets. I hadn't thought about that. I was thinking inverted V or U but the V limits the amount of lift unless I build it taller. Anyway, sounds like creating that U is beyond my ability unless I use pipe for that part. Or like Fordy said figure out the angles and make it with 5 sides. Thanks guys.
     
  7. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

    Messages:
    10,854
    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Location:
    Zone 7
    The unit pictured in the above link has much smaller tires/wheels than the moblile home tires you mentioned. The larger tires are a major plus. If you could find some even larger diameter wheels you would benefit from the larger diamter wheels ease of moving over obstacles. Have you ever seen a picture of the old horse/oxen pulled log movers? To copy from the antique equipment design would help since your are going to be limited with the ATV.
     
  8. desdawg

    desdawg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    205
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Arizona
    No, I haven't seen that. Do you have a link to some pic's?
     
  9. Wilbur

    Wilbur Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    150
    Joined:
    May 6, 2004
    Location:
    Taxachusetts
    Its not clear to me from the picture how you get the logs hoisted in the air for the grapples and it doesn't appear there is any lift capacity on the grapples themselves. That is something I would definitely want (although I realize you said you would be hauling small wood). Even a cum-a-long line over a pulley at the top of the U would give you some ability to get the butt end off the ground which is key. You don't want them to dig in when you are pulling, and on rough terrain you might need more clearance than you think.

    Good luck!!
     
  10. desdawg

    desdawg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    205
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Arizona
    The tongs are attached to a slip ring which is mounted over the slanted pipe from the tongue to the U. As you pull the trailer forward with the log attached the ring will slide up the slanted pipe lifting the front of the log off of the ground. At least I think that is how it is supposed to work.
     
  11. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

    Messages:
    10,854
    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Location:
    Zone 7
  12. Wilbur

    Wilbur Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    150
    Joined:
    May 6, 2004
    Location:
    Taxachusetts
    desdawg- pretty slick- I didn't notice that before. The weight of the tree and the forward motion of the "skidder" will pull the front of the log into the air and as long as you continue to move forward it should stay there. Pretty good! I like that. Good luck building it!
     
  13. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    596
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2005
    Location:
    Ohio
    The bottom portion of the frame is square tubing but if you look closely the horseshoe bent portion is actually 3 metal bars bent into a horseshoe shape. Those are pinned together by drilling holes and welding what appears to be a short piece of pipe to make a three layer structure. Looks like it would be pretty strong.

    No need to bend it, could use the A frame shape used by shop presses or tubing benders. Or just use the triangle A frame shape. The horseshoe shape gives more room for a bigger log and is an extremely efficient use of the metal used.
     
  14. desdawg

    desdawg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    205
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Arizona
    I saw those holes and didn't know what they were about. So is that 3 pieces of plate cut to the U shape? I guess that is not what you are saying. That would waste a lot of material.
     
  15. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    596
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2005
    Location:
    Ohio
    Nope, I would guess that is three pieces of plate, run thru a shaper type rig that is similar to a pipe bender. Once they have the plate bars in the right shape they are drilled and pinned via the pipe sections being welded in. Maybe it is done by heating and forming???? Could be cold rolled but those are nice looking pieces as finished how ever accomplished. Would seem to want to distort as a simple bending project. I doubt it is cut as a final unit, but could be cut from flat plate and then shaped. That would eliminate a lot of the bending that would be required. Be an adjustment to the radius, rather than a full bend.

    Probably done by a method that is very cost effective.

    I have done something similar in some lifting rigs, so can say that method is strong for the material involved. The idea of flat bars being structured into beams with a forming method that eliminates the mass of the metal.
     
  16. sherwood

    sherwood Active Member

    Messages:
    30
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    Wisconsin
  17. desdawg

    desdawg Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    205
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Arizona
    I keep hoping I will stumble across an old yoke somewhere but it hasn't happened yet. Lots of ways to load and haul logs on the Forestry Forum Sherwood. I lurk around there sometimes but I have never posted there. I hadn't seen that thread you referenced.
    Cosmic, that is just too high tech for me and my tools. Maybe I better stick to my pipe bender. I could have a square tube frame and a pipe arch. Make the arch first and then fit the frame to whatever size I end up with.
     
  18. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    596
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2005
    Location:
    Ohio
    desdawg,

    you can do the same thing with round pipe or tubing. Bend one horseshoe smaller than the other. Then pin them together with either pieces of pipe or solid bar. Might be nice to do them in different diameters. Like 2" and 1", those type members are far stronger than a single bent pipe and can weigh far less than something solid. Could even do three and make them into a triangle affair, should be able to use fairly small diameter pipe. Probably can dream up many ways to make an engineered member than is horseshoe shaped. In an engineered scheme not all the pipe have to go all the way around, some can be just bridged over the top section.

    These yokes go way back in time, were used in colonial times, made primarily of wood. They really haven't improved on the basic design. I've seen plans for building them to haul smaller firewood sized logs made from pretty light weight tubing and bicycle wheels. IIRC Mother Earth News did it using just bicycle parts.