Buffer zone between animals & agriculture???

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Mrs. Davis, Dec 30, 2006.

  1. Mrs. Davis

    Mrs. Davis Member

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    I'm not here a lot so if this has been discussed, please just refer me to the place ~thanks.

    I've been told by folks "in the know" that the Ohio Department of Agriculture (maybe this comes from the FDA) that there will be, in the future, a mandatory buffer zone of approx. 2 miles between farms that raise livestock and those that raise vegetables to sell. This would eliminate the farmers who use horses (like the Amish) for raising crops. This is to keep animal droppings far from the food supply.

    Can anyone direct me to where I might be able to find more concrete information about this?

    Warmly,
    Mrs. Davis
    davisfamily@ohiohills.com
     
  2. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    I am interested in this, because I don't know of anything of this and think it can't possibly be right.

    Some people may be mistaken with the literature that Ohio dept. of soil and conservation sent out. It's about the correct procedures of handling animal waste so it doesn't run into water sources.

    If you con't mind me asking who is your "in the know" source?
     

  3. Mrs. Davis

    Mrs. Davis Member

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    Hello!

    I got information from a farmer friend who attended a workshop in Wooster recently by OSU and while there other farmers mentioned this to him. Later, he was visiting a farmer/business owner in the Holmes County area who had been called in with some others in various areas of agriculture to a meeting by ODA concerning this topic and how it will affect the Amish population there (it's the largest settlement in the country). Apparently, they are quite upset about this.

    Anyway, I can't seem to find written information about this and perhaps, as you say, there isn't any, but I would sure like to find out. I would never have believed NAIS was for real, either ~smile.

    Warmly,
    Mrs. Davis
     
  4. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    I haven't the faintest idea whether these regulations exist or are contemplated, but would offer the following thought: it may be a proposal related to intensive livestock operations such as hog barns or feedlots, where the extreme volumes of manure make contamination of surface water by runoff more likely.

    Here in Manitoba, producers are supposed to file a manure management plan if they are over a certain number of "animal units" (used to calculate manure equivalency between species). Producers under the threshold are exempt from this requirement. Small scale livestock operations and homesteads would not generally be affected.

    I should note that the manure management plans do not prohibit use of manure on field crops. They prevent winter spreading and broadcast spreading. They encourage injection or composting methods, and stipulate the land base a producer must have access to handle the annual manure load. I don't know if vegetables are considered differently from the normal grain and oilseed crops one sees around here.

    The moral of the story is "wash your veggies"...
     
  5. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This certainly sounds like a bad rumor to me.
     
  6. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    It may have to do with those who do feedlot style farming and have manure lagoons and storage tanks. I find it totally uncomprehendable that it could include anyone else because there are so many existing orchards, grain farm/dairy farm combo's, dairy farms, berry farms, etc.

    Like I said, I've been receiving information about manure containment education, etc. And I could see someone making logical leaps with it.

    Keep us updated if you find out anymore.
     
  7. diane

    diane Well-Known Member

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    Why do folks think it would just affect Amish farmers? Sheesh......every person I know that keeps livestock also gardens. I think this is like some of the stuff that ends up as Urban Legends. If not, well...........what is that old saying about cold dead hands???? :hobbyhors
     
  8. Mrs. Davis

    Mrs. Davis Member

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    "Why do folks think it would just affect Amish farmers? Sheesh......every person I know that keeps livestock also gardens. I think this is like some of the stuff that ends up as Urban Legends. If not, well...........what is that old saying about cold dead hands???? "

    The Amish were mentioned because this meeting occurred in Holmes Co., Ohio, the largest Amish population in the US and this group sells much of their produce (and farms with horses). What I heard mentioned was only concerning those farmers who plan on selling their produce, etc., not the hobby farmer.

    I will try to keep you updated. I plan to call one of the farmers that was at that meeting today, if possible and get some more concrete information. I'm praying that this is false.

    Warmly,
    Mrs. Davis
    davisfamily@ohiohills.com
     
  9. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I really don't see how this could possibly be true. For one thing it would produce an unconstitutional "taking" by preventing neighboring farms from producing what they wish.
     
  10. Old Vet

    Old Vet In Remembrance

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    It sounds right if you are a city dweler with no guardens. You can't raise cows and hogs without manurie and you can't put it on crops that are to be soled to someone who doesn't know. You must use chemical fertilizer and forget manure. You can use it to coller the water green in the lagoon. If you use it on vegerable crops you may produce E-Coli or not. The two mile buffer zone is to protect the live stock from the poision that is used on vegetaples.

    If you think I am wrong look at my spelling. I used to be good at spelling but since I started useing vegetables I have been spelling terible.