Bucks worth eating

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by james dilley, Jul 29, 2005.

  1. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You might need to boil him first but yes he can be eated for Human food,.
     
  2. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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  3. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    Bucks are ok baked as well.
     
  4. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    Bunny sausage. That is how I use them. I do them like I do my roosters, bone it, grind it, season it and waala! sausage! :rock:
    Then boil the bones down for a broth. Can up your broth and you have it whenever you make soup or sometimes I cook rice in it.
    I am bad, I waste the innards and heads and feet. I have enough trouble with my dogs wanting to eat rabbits, dont want to help them out any..
    Have fun!
     
  5. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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  6. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    I just bone the roosters, put the meat threw my ancient (sunbeam mixer with attachment) meat grinder, then all you have to do is put in your seasoning for sausage or bag up and freeze for ground meat (i.e... meatloaf, hamburgers, whatever) I like putting in sage, cayenne, cumin, salt, garlic, pepper, umm and whatever else I get my hands on! We like spicey, so I use lots of pepper..
    When you bone them, there is sometimes some really tough tissue on the meat, and you have to strip that off, or it will mess up in the grinder. I take the meat, put it flat on the counter with the tissue side down and scrape with my knife, pulling the meat off and leaving all the thick tough tissue behind. This is usually found on the legs, and if you have a really old tough bird, you will find it on the thighs also.. Any older animal that has to go usually gets this treatment. Ground meat is soooo versitle, you can make anything out of it, even suasage. and with sausage, once you season it, let it sit in the fridge for a week or so, then freeze it or whatever. The longer it sits, the better it tastes.
    Sometimes if I have lots of meat to deal with (like go on a downsize spree or something) I will lightly brown the ground meat, pop in a jar and pressure can it. You dont even have to add but just a little water and salt to it, then you have instant taco meat, or chili meat, or whatever... You can even make little patties with it, lightly brown them, drop them into a wide mouth jar with a tad of water and pressure can it. That works good with the sausage too, then you have fast breakfast sausage patties...
    OK, I almost forgot this... when I am boning the meat, I dont fret over the little pieces that you cant get off, I just take the bones, toss them in a big huge pot, cover with water toss in a bay leaf or two, garlic cloves, and boil until bones are cooked. Then drain the broth into sterile canning jars, pop into the canner with your meat and pressure can that too. I use the broth for everything. Sometimes our water supply is low and this comes in handy if I want rice and not enough water to boil it in.... good for soup/stew base too. I could ramble forever.... but I think I did too long already!!
    lol! Have fun and dont be afraid to experiment. :clap:
     
  7. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    OK, do you do the meat raw?? Uncooked when you are de-boning--------sounds tough expecially for rabbit, but I never tried it, but I will. Randy
     
  8. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Could he be sterile because of the heat?
     
  9. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    Yep, I bone it and grind it raw. Be sure you have a really really sharp knife, and life will be easier for you! (just watch your fingers!!)
     
  10. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    This has happened to me several times. Too much heat equals a non-fertiles male.... :(
     
  11. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    I've been trying him since February, so I rather doubt it is the heat we've had for only the last week or two.
    Mostly I needed to know if bucks got "boartaint" the way hogs do. My wife doesn't like rabbit in pieces, so I was planning on grinding and stock for my bunnies.
    Thanks for all the great info.
     
  12. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

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    I just dressed out several older bucks, culling from my herd....
    (I've been lazy these last few months lol!) Havent noticed any muskyness, like with an old boar... just a little tougher is all. That is why mine went threw the grinder....
     
  13. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    The ONLY time I have ever noticed an 'odor' was when we had more than 1 juvenile in a pen. When they get older, they like to play cops & robbers, using urine as bullets...that can get odorifish....but the meat doesn't retain an ordor.
     
  14. Christiaan

    Christiaan Dutch Highlands Farm

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    Thanks for all your info. I'll be butchering in the morning while wife and granddaughter drive 33.8 miles to Krispy Kreme. DW doesn't like rabbit, but she'll eat doughnuts. Go figure!
     
  15. jimarh

    jimarh Well-Known Member

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    make either hasenpheffer or barbeque rabbit - recipes below;


    Barbeque:

    fry rabbit until brown
    slice 1 onion over the meat and then cover
    with
    1/4 c. catsup
    1/4 c brown sugar
    1/4 c water
    1/4 c vinegar
    1/2 t. soy sauce
    1/8 t. chili powder
    salt and pepper to taste
    cook in a shallow pan until tender at 350

    Hasenpheffer: - not real sure of the spelling but this is an old German
    recipe that is delicious.
    :happy:
    1 dressed rabbit
    2 c. vinegar
    2 c. water
    1/4 t. pepper
    1/2 c. sugar
    1 onion sliced
    2 T. salt
    1 t. pickling spice

    leave the rabbit in this solution for 2 days in the refrigerator. Remove
    rabbit and dry. Flour and brown in cooking fat. Strain the solution that
    the rabbit soaked in and add 1 cup of this to the rabbit in the frying pan
    and either simmer on low on top or put in oven over low heat until meat is tender.
    Thicken sauce to make gravy.