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Ive got a buck down. He was listless for a couple of days and now he's gone into the barn and is just laying around grinding his teeth. He's barely eating and drinking and has started with watery feces. I wormed him with Ivormectin a few days ago with no visable change. Worm him again? Antibotics?
 

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Ok, what color feces? Temp? Bloated or not? What has he been eating? Condition of coat? Can you flip his eye lid over and see if it is white or light pink or regular pink? Any other goats sick? What meds do you have on hand? How many other goats do you have and are they sick? Have you made any kind of management changes such as new feed or turned in to new pasture?
 

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I will copy and paste and also post some links for you...good luck with your buck.

from Maryland Coop Ext.:


Diarrhea in adult sheep and goats
Adult-onset diarrhea is less common than in lambs and kids, but nevertheless is possible. Parasitism can cause diarrhea in adult sheep and goats. Coccidiosis can occur in adults under extreme stress or due to lack of immunity. The ingestion of toxins, of which the list is long, can also cause diarrhea. It is not uncommon for sheep or goats to scour when they are grazing lush or wet pasture.

Johne's Disease (pronounced "Yo-nees")
Unlike cattle, diarrhea is not a common symptom of sheep and goats infected with Johne's disease. A USDA-APHIS study showed than less than 20 percent of sheep and goats with Johne's show diarrhea. Johne's disease is an incurable, contagious bacterial disease of the intestinal tract. It occurs in a wide variety of animals, but most often in ruminants. Johne's is most commonly reported in dairy cattle, but probably underrated as a problem in small ruminants.


Treatment Strategies

The most effective treatment for a scouring lamb or kid is rehydration by administering fluids.

Diarrhea should not be considered an illness in and of itself but rather a symptom of other more serious health problems in sheep and goats. It can be the symptom of many different illnesses, e.g. bloat, acidosis, enterotoxemia, and polio. Diarrhea is not always the result of an infectious disease. It can be induced by stress, poor management, and nutrition.

Before treating an animal for diarrhea, it is essential to determine why the animal is scouring. Take the animal's temperature using a rectal thermometer. If body temperature is above the normal range (102-103°F), fever medications and antibiotics can be used to control the infection.

Many of the common causes of diarrhea are self-limiting, and the major goals of treatment are to keep the animal physiologically intact while the diarrhea runs its course. A variety of oral antidiarrheal medications have been used in sheep and goats. They may be helpful, but no trials have ever been reported.

Pepto-Bismol (Bismuth Subsalicylate, Bismusal) is commonly used to treat livestock with diarrhea. Pepto Bismol contains bismuth which coats, soothes, and relieves the irritated lining of the stomach. Kaopectate (Kaolin-Pectin) can be used to treat non-infectious causes of diarrhea. Drugs which decrease gut motility (e.g. Immodium AD) should not be used. Oral yogurt or probiotics are often given to restore a more normal gut flora.

Antibacterial drugs tend to be very overrated in the treatment of diarrhea but they are sometimes indicated. Treatment with antibiotics is usually not useful when animals are infected with viruses or protozoa. However, antibiotics are useful when bacterial infections are the primary infective agent or where the risk of secondary bacterial infections is high. Sulfa-antibiotics or amprolium should be used in the case of coccidia
 

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What was he eating recently? Have you given any probiotics? Yogurt? Cud?

The grinding teeth sounds like pain to me. Adult asprin might help with that while you figure out what's wrong.

Have you seen him pee lately?
 

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Pure mischief
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I'd wonder about acidosis - has he gotten into anything? Baking soda, water and a bit of oil in a drench might help. Or Milk of Mag if you want something easier.
 

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Some pepto to sooth the stomache wouldn't hurt.
 

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why hide it?
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I guess the poster is outside with the buck, I was waiting for further info to offer specific help. Hope the buck is doing better.
 

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Check for bloat. Is his rumen working? Is it still soft? I just lost a doe with the same symptoms and she was bloated bad. Could still be acidosis that caused it too though. How is he today?
 
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