Broken leg

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by chippy778, Jun 14, 2017.

  1. chippy778

    chippy778 Well-Known Member

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    My dad called me this morning when he was feeding the pigs and said he thinks one has a broken back leg. I haven't seen it yet. But I think we will end up butchering it tonight. I'm guessing it weighs 140-150lb. Is that the best option normally? Or have the vet check it out and possibly treat it til it weighs more?
     
  2. GitaBooks

    GitaBooks Member

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    The heavier the animal the more pressure is put on a broken leg. If it is dragging the leg, struggling to stand or walk, or if the leg is badly swollen or damaged then unless you are willing to do extensive care I would say butchering is the only humane option. However, if there is just a limp and the pig can get to food, water, a resting area and isn't bullied, then you would be surprised how well they can heal.
    Please let us know what you find out when you see it yourself.

    Hoping for the best. : )
     

  3. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    I've seen pigs heal up from a broken leg with no intervention. If it is not compound or bleeding out, then I would observe. Vets tend to cost more than pigs. If it isn't doing well then cull it to meat.
     
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  4. chippy778

    chippy778 Well-Known Member

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    Ended up quartering it out tonight then put it in the fridge. Will finish tomorrow night. It only weighed 125 but I don't think it ate or drank much in the last 24 hours. When I got to check on it, it was up and drinking but would not put any pressure on that rear leg. Was hobbling along on 3 legs and not wanting to move at all and keeping that leg straight and not letting it touch the ground. I think we made the logical choice, but I'll know tomorrow when I finish cutting it up. But I have no idea how it happened either bunted by another one or possibly caught in hog panel? It did storm over night and I don't know if it or another one startled enough to cause an injury but atleast I'll be adding a little meat to the freezer.
     
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  5. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    You made the proper choice. There is no need to leave them in pain to see if they will cure there self. Try some fresh pork roasts by cutting a shoulder or ham in half or thirds, they were always one of our favorites.
     
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  6. chippy778

    chippy778 Well-Known Member

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    ImageUploadedByHomesteading Today1497574605.669325.jpg
    It tasted pretty good even though we didn't get a hole lot of meat from it. And when I cut up the back ham, it's femur was shattered. I still don't know how.
     
  7. Oregon1986

    Oregon1986 Well-Known Member

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    With a shattered femur I'm glad you put it down instead of letting it suffer.
     
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  8. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    Speaking as someone who has had a lot of broken bones including leg bones and arm bones I disagree with this sentiment of kill it rather than allowing it to heal. I've had 49 broken bones in my life. Only one of them did I get medical attention for. Our bodies are very good at healing breaks. Animals will heal themselves from most breaks and other injuries. Euthanasia is a euphemism that comes from misunderstanding.
     
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  9. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    Walter just post those thoughts on your customer sales list. If you want to let a hog heal there self with a broken femur be proud of the fact and advertise it. If you isolate and give care it is one thing, but if you just plan to see what happens it is another.
     
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  10. krackin

    krackin Well-Known Member

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    Could be quite a stack of hogs if one had to decide whether to put a couple hundred bucks into injury repair, wait a bit, or a bullet asap. Ol' Ma Nature has been taking care of business for a long time. I do buy gallons of wound spray just the same.
     
  11. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    Wanda, I move it to hospice or some other area where it can be cared for. That's why we have hospice areas near our house. Your implications of not caring are uncalled for. That wasn't what I said at all. Play nice.
     
  12. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    Read your post #8 and explain your reply to me. It sounds like you are saying that a hog should be as tough as you and that a shattered femur is no big deal. That is not the message I would want a new hog raiser to carry away from this thread.
     
  13. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Generally, when we "let Mother Nature take care of business", there is an enormous amount of pain and suffering. I ascribe to a set of standards that doesn't mention Mother Nature, but places responsibility and dominion over animals. It is a thick book of history and parables. I recommend it.

    Any serious bone break is liable to get infected. The liver is impacted and the blood becomes toxic. Then the meat becomes unsafe to eat. Some people eat road kill, too.

    I would like to find out what they discovered at the butcher.
     
  14. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Staff Member Supporter

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    Wanda, don't put words in my mouth.

    People are often all to quick to kill an animal that will heal up just fine. That is an important message for a new hog raiser.