Broken Leg, Help!!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by GOATDADDY, Jun 26, 2005.

  1. GOATDADDY

    GOATDADDY Well-Known Member

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    Just found my nanny with broken hind leg, wobbly, swollen, cut that blook spurts from when I move it. I"ll try to call a vet, what do you all say, help!
     
  2. JoyKelley

    JoyKelley Well-Known Member

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    did you reach a vet, if not a large animal vet, can you take her to an emergency veternarian clinic for dogs. Did you get the bleeding stopped.? I hope someone with real knowledge answers you soon. I feel horrible for you, let us know whats happening
     

  3. GOATDADDY

    GOATDADDY Well-Known Member

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    This has been a very bad weekend, I sprayed the wound with some iodine I had for animals, I wrapped the leg with some wrap my daughter had got from the vet for her dog. I stabilized the leg with this somewhat, the bleeding has seemed to stop. She holds the leg up but she is her same old sweet self. I talked to a vet, he said that the break where I described it was not going to be able to put on a cast. He said surgery and a pin would cost ten times what the goat was worth. He said he has seen them heal with a splint or even on their own. I will splint it as soon as I can get the material. I might give here a shot of antibiotic. This is very depressing.
     
  4. JoyKelley

    JoyKelley Well-Known Member

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    I just don't understand some vets. I am sure you will do the best you can for her, I expect the antibiotics are very important. Good luck setting the leg. Keep in touch about her progress.

    Joy
     
  5. animal_kingdom

    animal_kingdom Well-Known Member

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  6. animal_kingdom

    animal_kingdom Well-Known Member

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    I would definitely give her an antibiotic shot from the way the leg sounds cut. You did good putting something on it right away. We usually wash it out good with peroxide first and then work our way from there.

    Cut a splint from a piece of thin wood in the shape/angle of her opposite good leg is. When I splint a baby, I put some cotton cloth between the leg and the splint to keep it from rubbing the leg too much. But you'll want to use some bandages on the wound or leave what you have already on, the cloth and then the splint. Then use some vet wrap or the ace bandage stuff they have at any dept store and wrap it but not too tight as it will cause swelling. Check it first thing in the morning and change bandages if need be. Be sure to smell the wound. Anything starting to smell foul is infection starting or started.

    Also, If she's not up to date on her tetnus, now would be a good time.

    We keep our hurt animals in a smaller stall or pen for a few days to help restrict some movement. This gives them nothing much to do and helps them from further hurting themselves.
     
  7. GOATDADDY

    GOATDADDY Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies!! Will continue to ask questions and update when I have something to say or just need to (talk). I'm really going to try and save her, in a way it gives me a good feeling to be doing something, when I first discovered the broken leg I just could not think and I had thought about a splint but thought maybe it was a ridiculous idea. Thank you for posting. God bless you folks.
     
  8. mailman

    mailman Miniature Cattle

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    It sounds like your nanny has what is called a "compound" fracture. A coumpound fracture is where the bone protrudes/punctures the skin. A 'simple' fracture is where the broken bone does not protrude/break the skin. A compound fracture is the worst type of fracture (I used to teach combat medicine when I was a Drill Sergeant in the Army). In some extreme cases shock can become a factor and could become fatal. However, the key is to minimize the amound of pain. If a vet is not available you will have to fashion a splint (push the bone back through the skin and back into position), keep her isolated, administer a bandage over the wound (some bacitracin over the wound would help healing). Once the bleeding has stopped you could administer something for pain (aspirin?). Once the splint is finished, she should have a lessening of pain. An antibiotic would be helpful since the skin has been broken. Seek medical assistance, if possible. Keep her calm and good luck....Dennis
     
  9. dale anne

    dale anne Well-Known Member

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    I agree with getting a vet if possible but if yer county is like mine the vets wont touch her...but they will tell you to bring her in to be put down!...anyways...i agree also with pushing the bone back in as said above however he forgot to mention that cleaning the bone first is very important!...then fashion a split as said...you will need a bottle of blood stop...in a pinch cobwebs will do the same in stopping the blood but this is not the cleanest way to handle bleeding....if the bleeding is real bad apply pressure to the wound adding more bandages as they get soaked with blood...DO NOT! remove any of the bandages once on...wrap a clean bandage around the dirty ones when you get the bleeding under control..leave for a few days so that a scab can forn...then take peroxide and soak the bandges so you can remove them without ripping off the entire scab...I would give at this point so-be...and a strong antibiotic like procain or La200 IM 3cc for 3 days...keep wound clean after scab has formed...if you find maggots in the wound dont panic they will not hurt yer goat in fact it would be benificail as they only eat infected dead flesh...good luck...dale anne
     
  10. GOATDADDY

    GOATDADDY Well-Known Member

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    Well just got in the house from my daughter and I working on the aformentioned nanny goat. She broke her leg Sunday morning, I had it wrapped till today. It had stopped bleeding on Sunday after I wrapped it. Her leg is a little swollen which probably is to be expected. NO bone is poking through. As far as I could determin the ends are pretty much together. We laid here down, I cut off the old wrap, put a couple of clean socks up over the leg, applied splint so her leg was about the same angles as the good one. wrapped it with vet wrap, which holds very well I must tell you, I sprayed it with more iodine too. Gave her a shot that contained something against tetanus and a shot of an antibiotic, some type of pcn, and gave her some more corn and hay. She's got a good appetite, loves all the attention, fell asleep in my daughters lap for a while. Now I plan to just leave her leg alone for maybe a month? I put her in her own stall. She had a kid but it is probably 4 months or 5 by now. I seperated them cause they get so rough when they nurse they literally raise their mothers off the ground sometime. I appreciate all the help. No the vets aren't into goats around here but if this works, I'll feel pretty good about the whole thing. Thanks again for the advice and if you have anymore thoughts I appreciate that too.
     
  11. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've splinted broken bones by:

    1. Wrap sterile wrap around the wound.

    2. Wrap cotton batting around the leg.

    3. Vetwrap over that.

    4. THEN split with a thin board or piece of metal cut/shaped to fit.

    5. Another layer of cotton batting, and another layer of vet wrap over the splint.

    6. Finally, secure the wrap with duct tape.

    7. And spray with bitter apple if the goat wants to chew it.

    Idea is to cushion the splint from rubbing against the leg. You may want someone familiar with wrapping horse legs to show you "how" tight to get the wrapping. You can cause more problems if things are too tight.

    Might ask that sorry vet if he can at least provide some decent antiobiotics. She'll be at high risk of infection.

    Note: bones heal fast to the point where they won't hurt. She may try to put weight on the leg before it's safe to do so, and rebreak it. You might consider confining her in a very small stall for several weeks.

    Leva
     
  12. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds like you've done great. I just want to add that the splint should come up past the next joint, and you should leave it on for probably 6 weeks. Wrap should start at the bottom and go up. If the leg remains warm below the break, it's a good sign that she still has good circulation and is healing.
     
  13. dale anne

    dale anne Well-Known Member

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    Howdy just wanted to add a lil something...you said leave the leg alone...I am not sure if that means your not going to check it or rewrap it....but I would take the splint off at least once a week and check for infection,absesses,and such...then re wrap...the splint itself my rub and cause an awful sore!...ya can also see if the leg is getting good circulation by taking a lil peice of tape or a white paint marker and mark her hoof right at the hair line...look at it once a week...if she is ok you will see hoof growth above the line...her hoof is still growing....also check gums and make sure they are a healthy pink...if pale it's a sign that something is wrong...dale anne
     
  14. GOATDADDY

    GOATDADDY Well-Known Member

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    You folks are great! God bless you and thanks for all the tips.
     
  15. Becky H.

    Becky H. Well-Known Member

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    Hi I don't have a goat but just wanted to offer encouragement. My dog broke both his hind legs and one (was that procedure they cut the bone off )they couldn't pin it the vet said he needed one good back leg to stand on for the pin to set. The other one had a clean break and lined up well and he suggested to leave it.

    That was 3 years ago and the dog is fine and running like you wouldn't have known it happened. We had to give the dog sedatives at first to give it chance to heal up "in place" so keep the activity down for a bit on the goat.

    You got good advice the goat will be fine with 3 good legs to stand on if you can keep the broke leg lined up it will be fine. You're doing well, good luck!
     
  16. shelbynteg

    shelbynteg Well-Known Member

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    PVC pipe cut in half lengthwise can make a great splint, lightweight, sturdy, and cheap. I understand the vet not recommending surgery, but if its a dear pet, a person can always insist. Goats don't always react well to anesthesia, either, I lost a very expensive buck that way. Surgery is my least favorite alternative.
     
  17. moonspinner

    moonspinner Well-Known Member

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    Goatdaddy, just curious. Is this goat moving around at all? Is it standing? If she moves does she hobble on three legs? I would be always worried she would put weight on it before it's healed and break it again. Also, any idea how the break happened?
     
  18. mary,tx

    mary,tx Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have had a couple of goats that broke a leg, both healed very well. If the splint is done right, they can move about as much as is comfortable for them without a problem. And, since I did a good job, I'm thinking it's not that hard.
    mary
     
  19. GOATDADDY

    GOATDADDY Well-Known Member

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    Nope, I don't have a clue how it happened (only guesses). Yes she moves about, she lays down on either side, usually keeps the bad leg on top. She does not put weight on the bad leg but I tried to make the splint stick out past her foot so if she accidently did, the weight would go to the splint and not her foot, which, my theory was that the weight would be distributed up the splint to the top part of her leg which would bear weight without putting pressure on the bottom part below the break. I get mixed up when I think about it and basically didn't think it through very long but I hope I was sort of right. She does not walk on the bad leg. She eats alfalfa hay, corn, mineral, some occasional elm tree leaves I give her. Her appetite is good, personality is the same. I don't have to work for the next three days so I can spend a little extra time with her. Maybe let her out to eat some bluegrass in the yard. Thanks for the questions. You know it is kind of suprising how calm and careful she is. I think goats are smarter than I thought and I thought they were smart.
     
  20. havenberryfarm

    havenberryfarm Well-Known Member

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    I have a little doeling that just had her splint removed. She is a little stiff and her muscles atrophied a lot, but otherwise she is OK. she runs around with the others and kicks up her heals too. My vet said that goats heal amazingly well. Hang in there. You are doing great. Also, I want to pass on that I saw splints for sale at the Tractor Supply, so if you have one nearby you should take a look.