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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am wondering how many people started out having goats for family use and then became a breeder and or breed to have more goats for family use. I am starting to think that it might not be a bad idea to breed a few extra and have them to sell to help cover the cost of things for the goats. For example: I sold any of my extra chickens eggs, to help cover the cost of winter feed.


I also notice that most of you have farm names; I was wondering how you came up with them and what not. Did most of you start out with some land and then turned it into farms? Did you sort of just fall into having farms. I like to here the history behind things.

I grew up on a 10 acre mini horse farm; my parents also rented some land so we had about 100 acres total to grow up on and enjoy. I currently own 5 1/2 acres which I call our mini farm because i don't know what or if I should name it.
 

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Pook's Hollow
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Well, I read an article in "Hobby Farms" about Nigerian Dwarf goats, so I just had to have some. I'd always wanted goats and we had an acre, so they sounded perfect. I bought two bred does, but one turned out not to be bred, so not enough milk. Then I bought a couple of kids, one Alpine, one NubianX, but it was still too long before I would get milk. So I bought a registered Saanen doe, and things kind of snowballed.

I now breed Saanens,which I show, Nigerian Dwarfs and Boers, along with a ragtag collection of grades. :sing:

My farm name came about because I am a Morris dancer (google it :D) and a "half caper" is a dance step in Morris dancing. "Caper" is derived from the Latin "capra" for goat, and it's what goats do. Since I started out breeding Nigerian Dwarfs, which are basically "half a goat", I came up with Half Caper Farm. My fellow Morris dancers think it's a hoot!
 

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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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We are Quirky Goat Farm because all of our goats have come to us for one reason or another of having a quirk.

Orange has only one teat. She is Alpine and our main milker.
Pumpkin was a yearling Nubian who had not bred and was culled from a large milking herd. She has produced twins for us and is milking now.
Princess is a mature LaMancha who self sucks if her bag gets too full.

Just a bunch of quirks!:banana02:
 

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I had always wanted a farm, before we had moved we had a small boarding kennel. Our kennel name was Cannon Kennels, Cannon from our last name. We moved to a hick town, on a dirt rd with over 300 acers around us with two other homes, one was built
(15 acers between us) after we bought ours and yet it was against zoning to have a kennel, go figure we could have one in a major atlanta suburb but not in hickville.

When the economy first started to look sour I knew it was time to make our little spot of dirt work for us as much as possible, I bought a few chickens and goats so that if worst came to worst we would have meat, milk and eggs, we did a garden but failed this year thanks to the attack of the squash bugs and drought.
Giving my show background in horses and dogs and the desire to show goats, we had to have a farm name and Cannon to me just sounds strong and powerful so it was fitting of the goat to show boer goats, before the goats it was going to be patchwork farm because we where putting it together like patchwork.
 

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i got goats b/c the dairy farm i was working on (cattle) sold out and i detested the idea of store milk. the very day they sold i got a goat. i had been trying to buy one of the cows, but there was no way i could afford, nor would i want to, pay $1600 for a 3 teated broken mouthed old cow with a bad bag. i had been researching milking goats for a month, and the *idea* sounded perfect, but the only experience with drinking the milk was poor--it was very goaty, and the only goats i'd known were those nasty tempered things often sold at horse auctions. then i read on why goaty milk taste happens and it made sense, the boy who gave me the taste i am certain wasn't much for practicing clean habits! the man i called about finding a goat said 'hey, i got one here right now that kidded a few days ago, but one died, the other probably will, you can try her' i went to 'just look', but she came home in my trunk!

she was wild! but i figured it out how to at least deal with her a little, and that first drink of milk was amazing! sooo good! i got another nicer goat the next week (same guy) and milked them for a couple months. never did have to buy milk in the store! gave back the wild one, and just kept collecting goats where i could find ones i liked. i now have 4 adult does, 3 doelings, and a buck. 2 of the adult does are in milk now, hoping all are now bredl.

i call our place CDiamond because that is our cattle/horse brand. if we ever get moved to our little 16 acres, it'll just be CDiamond Homestead, as i feel silly calling anything around here that's under 50 acres a 'farm' or 'ranch'. the goats have since paid for their purchase prices, and most of their feed. i went from a person who'd said 'i hate goats! the only animal i really hate!' to 'i just looove my goaties!'

i am breeding for improving what i have, and to sell a few milkers in the future, already getting calls for those. i also plan to put excess kids in my freezer, they bring little money here, would do us better as meat. i like doing things the old ways, and very much enjoy dairying for my own, tho on a very small scale.
 

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I have done the opposite...went into it intending to breed and now am down to just family milkers. I found out I was too wimpy to breed. I would stew and worry about who is going to have what kid and will they sell for what they are worth and what if one of the sold ones dies and on and on and on. So I tried getting rid of all of them, which lasted about 6 months, because I really enjoy having them around as well as the milk. So I now have two Nubians.

As to farm name we are the Daileys and I have long wanted to have a bakery called "Dailey Bread" but instead we now have "Dailey Bred" for the chickens, goats and Angora rabbits.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Cannon- County's can be so strange on what they will and won't allow.


Chewie- I got the chickens because 3 years ago eggs were so pricey; I went in with a bunch of ladies from my church that wanted chickens, I got 30 chickens for $30.00. I had gotten the goats to clear the property and didn't have an real plans to keep them. I started doing research and found they were cheaper than the cow I wanted and I could make cheese from their milk. I still plan on getting a cow; but it will be a while. I have had goats milk and didn't like it; I have read if you do not keep a buck near by that you don't get the musky smell or taste and that you have to have a dairy breed goat as well.

Pook Hollow- I think Pook Hollow would be a cute name for a farm; that is a hoot about the dance and what not.

Rose- I also like the Quirky Goats, too funny about how you got some of your goats.

I have been racking my brain trying to figure out something to call my menagerie of animals;I love glow in the dark stuff and my husband and I go to a lot of the Celtic festival that are in are area. I am trying to find things that both fit us and our land. Its funny shaped; it is 63 feet wider in the front than it is in the back, I think is it called a quadrilateral rectangle.
 

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In my area it's hard as all get out to sell unregistered goats. There's no food market for them and fewer homesteaders. So I'm actually the reverse ... I got into it thinking I could breed and sell a few extra, but then found it's too difficult and cut back to just family needs (milk and a little meat).

I've never been into registered livestock. Often they get priced out of usefulness for the small homesteader. We're a vanishing breed of life as it is. Plus, I've always been such a huge fan of hybrid vigor.

Our farm started out as Tanglewood Hill, though there's little woods and no hill. It got confusing though because of the big commercial outfits that share similar names. This past year we changed the name to "Thorn Valley". We were reading "Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of Nimh" to the kids that month, and I realized that the super-intelligent rats and myself both had the same plan ... to move out to a remote location and raise our own food and be self-sufficient and off the grid.
 

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We moved out onto our wooded property in a travel trailer with the 3 kids (2, 4 and 8) and I wanted them to raise animals and show like I did. Plus being alla mother earth news folks, wanted milk for the family and extra meat also. It didn't take me long to realize that running nanny and billy unregistered goats was not the way to go and got into Nubians, selling milk, breeding for better milkers, exporting, showing. I never saw my farm being what it was when I first started, or even invisioned that my soap would be such a huge move away from the large herd. I hit maybe 1 or 2 shows a year now, but do appraise.

Ironically 22 years later in Nubians a gal I purchased one of my first purebreds from, her son is now starting his herd as a late 20 something with my guidance.

Have a goal and then be flexible enough to make the big moves when the opportunity arises. Never say never and don't burn bridges that you may need further ahead in your business. vicki
 

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Cannon- County's can be so strange on what they will and won't allow.


When I lived in Oregon, I had seven acres. I wanted to breed a few Great Danes. By law, I couldn't get a kennel license, because my property was too narrow. Yet, if the dogs were PETS, I could have chained one every three feet around the entire perimiter. That's the Gov't. for you. :flame:

Madfarmer
 

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Oh, and my farm name is gonna be Tailspin Farm. When the goats are happy (or in heat) their li'l tails look like airplane propellers. That, and once you start aquiring livestock, it's all DOWNHILL from there!

Madfarmer
 

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When I first wanted goats I wanted just one family milker. Then I started to research and I realized that wasn't going to work. Then I realized that I'd have to breed to have milk and that opened a whole other can of worms. I took a deep breath, did a LOT of research, and met a lot of goat herders and decided that if I was going to breed even one animal, I wanted to buy the healthiest, highest quality animals I could afford and I wanted to produce the same. I started with some decent stock consisting of two does and one buck and kept researching. I took a gamble on another doe that wasn't top notch herself but who I thought had potential and who threw nice kids and had amazing genetics. I continued researching and started putting money into deposits on the best stock I could find locally so that I could see the parents, the prior kids, and how they produce in person. Now that I'm more comfortable with certain lines and have learned A LOT more, I'm starting to look outside the State and getting ready to fly in my first goats from Outside. I'm planning to pare out those that I've purchased that aren't up to the standards I want in the next 12 to 18 months, and continually cull to get the best I can produce. My goal is to contribute to and help preserve the breed so I have taken on a big responsibility in this. We all have to start somewhere and we don't always have the best available to us or we don't always make the best choices, but it's always good if you can keep improving.

As for farm names, I had a gazillion different ideas but most were taken or were too long or were too hard to spell or were confused with another similar name. Some were wonderful but were used by others in the area for non-goat stuff and I didn't want any confusion. We chose a play on our last name. I can't say I'm thrilled with the name, but it's short and memorable so it works.
 

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We bought 5.5 acres 7 years ago and said that we would not get farm animals for at least two years.

Three weeks lter, we got two goats (Obers) simply as pets and because I fell in love with them and knew that they were destined to be burritos. I knew nothing of CL/CAE or other health concerns - I just thought they were cute. Fortunately, they came from a reputable breeder that tests.

The second year, we bred them to a Nubian Buck just for fun. We had babies, never milked the mamas and kept one doe with silly airplane ears. The following year, we bred the goats again (including the ober/nubian). At the time when those babies were born, our own baby (humanoid) was having trouble nursing and my wife did not want him on formula. I tried milking our goats and loved it - the milking and the milk.

We now have 5 does but I had very bad luck with breeding this year and did not have babies. We have no goat milk right now at all but I am breeding them back in the next few weeks. I do have a Jersey cow so that helps.

I will never go big time but will probably always have a few goats - I love them. I also think that its fairly easy around here to cover your costs with the sale of babies and surplus milk. Oregon allows the sale of raw milk, given a few loose guidelines and I have a huge waiting list.
 

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In 2001 I sold my home and bought a 5 acre lot w/ old farm house 40 miles away in the city limits of a very old small town. I bought a JD tractor and all implements and gardened heavily for two years. I rescued four baby chickens that were abandoned in a box at the dumpster. From there came a chicken explosion. Now I always have fresh meat and eggs.

I retired in 2004 and decided to supplement food cost by raising boer meat goats; Fenced in an acre, built a little barn for protection from the elements, bought a pg doe and two doelings. WELL I had been a goat snob but found that they were simply adorable. MeeMa gave birth to beautiful twins Jack and Jill. I could hardly put them down to walk and I spent hours watching the little devils. Doelings Dulce and Rosa got sick, lost Rosa and vet saved Dulce from Cocci. ($125 later). A sheep-owner neighbor no longer wanted his 5 mo. buckling raised by his four year old. (too much goat for the boy) so Simón arrived. NO WAY could I kill, let alone eat one of these guys. Another neighbor asked me about goats to clear some brush, so I sold the lot (with visitation rights) to him and bought LaMancha. After I had bought the Boers I met yet another neighbor who has a goat dairy. I discovered that this snob LOVED the first glass of goat milk. OH MY GOODNESS it was so good. I taste tested several breeds, milked his goats alot, visited other farms, joined this forum. I discovered on this forum the word for me; "goat addict" with little relief from the addiction. Particularly the babies or even just their pictures cause me great setbacks. Remembering the goat puddle by WaygrOOvy and Thaiblue’s three charmers, cookingpam’s little brute. I should have some relief about Jan. 15 because Suzie and Ava are due.

However, I really can't stand to be around a stinky ole buck. OH MY, I could gag just thinking of that wretched smell.

OK, now I don’t have the same affliction with sheep or chickens. Just goats. I have no problem eating others. SO, I’m in a pickle that is probably unknown to most posters on this forum. Ava gave birth last April to Tomas and Rubin. I can’t keep them – I can’t eat them, I can’t sell them to be eaten – I can’t . . . So they are still here. Woe is me!

Great thread. Tx. Paul
 

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I was doomed from the very beginning. Grew up on a small farm with a diary next door...always over there playing with the goats.
My friends nicknamed me Nanny Goat. My older bro raised chickens, ducks, a few cows and got to do 4h.
By the time parents divorced it was off the farm & never saw my just bred white face heifer again.

After marrying and having little two kids we lived on a place that we could have chickens and a few Nubians for milk & meat.

Several yrs & moves later the kids grown I started realizing I didnt want to work at my grunt job anymore so I cashed in my stock investments and bought some Boers. So thats part of the reason we call it Laughing Stock.
Now now I spend my time mucking and being a servant to them.

We have done some showing, for us it's the fun part to meet up with folks we only see a couple of times a year.

As for breaking even the chickens have done well there and my one Nubian bought all her own feed last year with milk sales. So if we make it, we can laugh, if not you can laugh at us.
Thank God dh still has a regular job.
 

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Pook's Hollow
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Pook Hollow- I think Pook Hollow would be a cute name for a farm; that is a hoot about the dance and what not.
Pook's Hollow was my first thought for a farm name, as there are many, many places in Britain called Pook's Hill, or Puxhill or some variant, but no Pook's Hollow - and we lived in a low spot at the time. Then we bought this place and our house is on one of the highest spots around, so Pook's Hollow didn't quite work . . .
 

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"Taylor's NestEgg"

Our son is Taylor
the farm is for him
He will have a chance to own his own business.
It is his furture.

Though he was 9 he got to pick out which trees we needed to keep to become a tree house or swing for his kids. He picks out a few trees each year for his future orchard. I am hoping that his involement will encourage him to understand the imporance of working hard.
 

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this has been really a fun thread!

vicki--a travel trailer with 3 kids?? i wouldn't mind more of that story!
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
What great histories behind your farm name; if you have a farm name, and I really enjoyed how you came to own goats and what not. I grew up with horses, cats, dogs and cows. As I already mentioned I got into chickens; when eggs were about 2.75 a doz, and I had no chickens for a year due to stray dogs and I used the time to make my coop stronger, I of course am thrilled to have my chickens back, now I just need them to start laying again. I also mentioned that I got the goats to help clear underbrush on my land; they have done a great job on my garden, which is where I have them until I finish the fence. I have also have started to see what their personality is like; Maggie is the bossy type, Lucy is the more shy one. They still don't like to be caught or handled much; I still keep treats handy to let them know I am friendly, I am working on teaching them to come when I whistle. It was funny to see them pushing and shoving each other; while I was trying to get their food to them and what not.
 

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In 1998, I rented a mobile home on 6 acres from some friends of mine. I did not intend to have livestock. I was just looking for a place where I could have my cats and get a dog. Someone else had a couple horses on part of the land. In the fall of 99, I got a job working on a goat dairy. Part of my job was to care for the baby goats. My DH had a friend with a ranch and they started buying bucklings form the dairy to raise for meat. I would keep some of the babies at my place for the first couple of weeks. When I talked about keeping two of the wethers for pets and weed eaters, both hubby and my employer said to get a couple doelings instead. I got a Nubian and a Saanen. My boss/friend shows goats and I went along to help her. I brought my two kids. The Saanen did real well and I got hooked on the goat scene. I bought several more goats that year and bred them that winter. I got more does the next year. For a while, I raised both Boers and dairy goats. The Boers were getting too fat being raised like dairy goats and I don't have the time and space to run two herds, so I sold the Boers. I now raise mostly Nubians along with a few recorded grades. It's a challenge to breed show quality Nubians and I enjoy seeing improvements in my herd. I have customers who buy milk and I enjoy making yogurt and feta cheese. ADGA requires members to have a herd name. Hubby said he'd pay half the fee if we used our last name, so we are Zirngibl Dairy Goats.
 
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