Homesteading Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay this is my first breeding season in which I figure out how to get a doe bred. I had bought 2 pregnant does that kidded on my farm but never had to get anyone bred. So question is when they get a visit from the buck how do you know they are truly bred? He does his thing and after about 30 minutes to an hour he leaves them alone as if he has decided they are bred. He goes crazy at first. Does he really know that he has done his job or something? How long do you leave them in the pen together? He will check the back ends of the does and I have seen him smell then go after the doe and then I have seen him smell and just leave them alone. I know which does he I guess thinks he has successfully bred. They would be Cleo Lily and Snow. He is very frustrated with Abigail he sniffs the back end and mounts her. The only difference is Abigail is a first timer. All the others are second fresheners. Could there be something wrong with her and the buck knows she won't take? Sorry I have so many questions. I have talked to people about it and they make it sounds so ABC's like you just put the buck in and in 5 months you got babies. I just don't want to end up like CBJ in 5 months with no kids or milk hehehe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Well, after an hour in a pen with a receptive doe, a buck has probably bred her multiple times and is too exhausted to continue. The release of the egg, and subsequent fertilization & implantation, will not have happened at this stage. So there would be no way for the buck to know the doe is bred. He just knows he has done all he can :)

Young bucklings will mount anything that stands still for .0001 seconds. A doe who is not in heat will promptly beat up these bratty bucklings, so bucks learn to sniff butts to check the doe's hormone levels to prevent another whupping.

Since Abigail is a doeling, she may have an immature reproductive system, which can make doelings come into false heats where they are receptive but don't ovulate, or have silent heats. She may also be intimidated by the buck and will stand for him even when she doesn't want to be bred.

The best way to know for sure that a doe is bred is to do a Bio-Pryn blood test.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response! He has all the does in place I have watched the one pick a fight and he wouldn't stop till he had won. He has them well in submission. Now that doe has never picked on him again. However what you are saying makes a lot of sense. Abigail has been a pet. She is really 5 years old now. We just decided to breed her this year. However she had never been bred till this point. We decided to let her kid so we could have meat or sell the babies and then eat her. We are so extremely tight on money right now that we can't get tests done. I know that is bad however that's just the truth. That's why I was hoping for another way to tell. Do you know about how much they are? Just in case I find some way to get enough money.
 

·
Pook's Hollow
Joined
·
4,568 Posts
When the buck mounts the doe, he will fling his head back when he ejaculates. Since you are pen-breeding, you can be pretty confident that your does are bred, as the buck will continue to breed them for the couple of days that they are in standing heat. Keep an eye on them for the next two or three weeks - if they come back into heat, put the buck in with them for another few days (that's if you're not just leaving him in)

I have to guess at my does, load them up and drive for half an hour. I've had several repeat visits so far this season. Oh well, the buck owner is a friend of mine, so we have a good chat!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
A five year old first freshener put s whole new spin on things. I assumed she was 6-10 months old, when does are usually bred for the first time.

Does that aren't bred get fat, and the fat accumulates around the ovaries and prevents ovulation. A five year old is also getting some age to her and could have systic ovaries, where the egg matures but doesn't detact from the ovary, casuing the doe to constantly be "in heat" and receptive, but never get pregnant. Cystic ovaries can be treated with an injection if caught in time.
Abigail could be difficult to get bred.

The Bio-Pryn test is around $15 for the test itself. There's also the expense of the vet visit unless you can do a blood draw yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Okay I knew that happened with rabbits longer you wait harder it is to get them bred. She is big but not as big as her mother Cleo. If she doesn't throw kids the year we will just have to eat her instead because that was what was going to happen anyways..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,357 Posts
If you draw the blood yourself, it's only 7.50 for the test - you'll spend more than that on feeding her for 5 months and then finding out she's not bred, and it's better than butchering her only to find out she was pregnant! Think big picture. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,252 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well I was gonna butcher after I would full well know she was not bred. But you do have something there it will cost me 7.50 in feed to feed her for 5 months so might as well see. I have someone wanting a butchered duck and 2 chickens so I have a little extra money now. Though I am a bit afraid to draw blood as i've never done it before. I have seen my little brothers blood drawn at least 100 times but that ain't gonna help me.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top